Abigail Adams
first Second Lady of the United States, second First Lady of the United States
Abigail Adams
Abigail Adams was the wife of John Adams, who was the second President of the United States, and the mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth. She was the first Second Lady of the United States, and the second First Lady of the United States. Adams is remembered for the many letters she wrote to her husband while he stayed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the Continental Congresses.
Biography
Abigail Adams's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Abigail Adams
News
News abour Abigail Adams from around the web
The right to community - The Spokesman Review
Google News - over 5 years
He references a quote from Abigail Adams, urging her husband John in 1776 to treat women as equals in the Declaration of Independence: “We are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or
Article Link:
Google News article
Actors from New York and Scotland and young people explore Shakespeare's 'The ... - The Mercury
Google News - over 5 years
Artistic Director Abigail Adams said. "Our work with young people will increasingly inform our productions. For example, we expect this summer's lab to lead to a future production of 'A Winter's Tale.' We also expect that our summer research will lead
Article Link:
Google News article
Saith the Prescriptivist, There is nothing new transpired under the sun - First Things (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The current Merriam-Webster's, however, claims that the older Webster's “Sense 4” goes back to the late eighteenth century, and even quotes a 1775 letter by Abigail Adams as proof: “there is nothing new transpired since I wrote you last
Article Link:
Google News article
HOME PLATE: East Coast trip gleans fish and history - STLtoday.com
Google News - over 5 years
I developed an interest in the Adams family in my elementary school classroom, where a set of biographies included one of Abigail Adams, John's wife. At Adams National Park, a ranger told how she creatively dealt with wartime economies and colonial
Article Link:
Google News article
Whiz Kid: Scholarship Motivated Pearson to Look Twice at Higher Education - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Key to Awesomeness: At first I didn't think I wanted to go to college, but because of high MCAS scores I was awarded with the John and Abigail Adams scholarship. This gave me so much motivation to attend Cape Cod Community College in
Article Link:
Google News article
Emmy contenders: Will Laura Linney continue to go undefeated? - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
And in 2008, she won a third prize, once again in the movie/miniseries race, for her lead role as Abigail Adams in the HBO miniseries "John Adams." Last year marked her first regular television role, playing a woman battling cancer on Showtime's "The
Article Link:
Google News article
Book reviews: Four histories bring nation's founders to life - Press-Register - al.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
By Press-Register Correspondent Of America's founding generation, a magnificent seven stand out above the rest — George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Abigail Adams, Ben Franklin, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison
Article Link:
Google News article
Weymouth: Town approves funds for Abigail Adams Middle School roof repair - 95.9 WATD-FM (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Weymouth town council unanimously voted Monday night to appropriate $849000 to fix three roofs at the Abigail Adams Middle School. The town's Director of Maintenance Tom Slattery informed the town council about the repairs and said,
Article Link:
Google News article
Steele Hays: Looking back to see ahead - Log Cabin Democrat
Google News - over 5 years
In one of her frequent and fertile letters to John Quincy Adams, Abigail Adams writes: “Learning is not attained by chance. It must be sought with ardor and attended with diligence.” Sixth, cherish the respect of others, I believe the human spirit
Article Link:
Google News article
Brookfield seeks second round of bids for playground - Danbury News Times
Google News - over 5 years
Landscape architect Abigail Adams, who wrote the specifications, said new contract documents for the half-million-dollar playground project -- $250000 of which will come from a state grant -- were made available Tuesday, and the resulting bids will be
Article Link:
Google News article
A Day for Quick Tears - Dover Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But the alternative was worse than the disease: Nabby Adams, the daughter of John and Abigail Adams, suffered through a mastectomy in which she was tied to a chair while, without anesthesia, her breast was removed. She survived the surgery only to die
Article Link:
Google News article
Star-Spangled Abigail Adams Letter Found - WCVB-TV
Google News - over 5 years
Just in time for the Fourth of July, a letter written by Abigail Adams to her son Thomas in 1801 and signed “Mother A. Adams” was discovered at the Tufts Library, our news partner Wicked Local/Weymouth reported. The letter has been an electrifying find
Article Link:
Google News article
Star-spangled Abigail Adams letter rediscovered - Wicked Local
Google News - over 5 years
photo/Tom Gorman Tufts Library Director Rob MacLean looks at Abigail Adams' newly discovered letter she wrote to her son Thomas in 1801. By Jeanne Rideout Just in time for the Fourth of July, a letter written by Abigail Adams to her son Thomas in 1801
Article Link:
Google News article
If you're too hot to move, celebrate with TV remote - Arizona Daily Star
Google News - over 5 years
Paul Giamatti portrays John Adams and Laura Linney plays Abigail Adams in HBO's eight-hour miniseries "John Adams," which begins at 8 am Monday. One word comes to mind when thinking about television programming on the Fourth of July: marathons
Article Link:
Google News article
COMMENTARY: Adams scholar beloved by many - The Patriot Ledger
Google News - over 5 years
By Anonymous When the Massachusetts Historical Society announced this week that they'd been given a previously unknown Abigail Adams letter from 1788, the person I wished I could have called for a comment was historian Paul Nagel
Article Link:
Google News article
Abigail Adams letter found stashed in desk - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
Abigail Adams, wife of the second US president, penned one last letter before sailing home to Braintree in 1788 after several years in Europe. Historians never knew the letter was written, but earlier this year it was found in the family ... - -
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Abigail Adams
    OTHER
  • 1818
    She also asked Louisa Adams in a letter dated January 3, 1818, "When will Mankind be convinced that true Religion is from the Heart, between Man and his creator, and not the imposition of Man or creeds and tests?"
    More Details Hide Details Historian Joseph Ellis has found that the 1200 letters between John and Abigail "constituted a treasure trove of unexpected intimacy and candor, more revealing than any other correspondence between a prominent American husband and wife in American history." Ellis (2011) says that Abigail, although self-educated, was a better and more colorful letter-writer than John, even though John was one of the best letter-writers of the age. Ellis argues that Abigail was the more resilient and more emotionally balanced of the two, and calls her one of the most extraordinary women in American history. The Abigail Adams Cairn – a mound of rough stones – crowns the nearby Penn Hill from which she and her son, John Quincy Adams, watched the Battle of Bunker Hill and the burning of Charlestown. At that time she was minding the children of Dr. Joseph Warren, president of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, who was killed in the battle.
  • 1816
    In a letter to her son near the end of her life, dated May 5, 1816, she wrote of her religious beliefs:
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1800
    After John's defeat in his presidential re-election campaign, the family retired to Quincy in 1800.
    More Details Hide Details Abigail followed her son's political career earnestly, as her letters to her contemporaries show. In later years, she renewed correspondence with Thomas Jefferson, whose political opposition to her husband had hurt her deeply. Abigail and John's marriage is well documented through their correspondence and other writings. Letters exchanged throughout John's political obligations indicate his trust in Abigail's knowledge was sincere. "She could quote poetry more readily than could John Adams," states McCullogh. Their correspondence illuminated their mutual emotional and intellectual respect. John often excused himself to Abigail for his "vanity", exposing his need for her approval.
    When John was elected President of the United States, Abigail continued a formal pattern of entertaining. With the removal of the capital to Washington in 1800, she became the first First Lady to reside at the White House, or President's House as it was then known.
    More Details Hide Details The city was wilderness, the President's House far from completion. She found the unfinished mansion in Washington "habitable" and the location "beautiful"; but she complained that, despite the thick woods nearby, she could find no one willing to chop and haul firewood for the First Family. Abigail did use the East Room of the White House to hang up the laundry. Adams' health, never robust, suffered in Washington. She took an active role in politics and policy, unlike the quiet presence of Martha Washington. She was so politically active, her political opponents came to refer to her as "Mrs. President".
  • 1788
    They returned in 1788 to a house known as the "Old House" in Quincy, which she set about vigorously enlarging and remodeling.
    More Details Hide Details It is still standing and open to the public as part of Adams National Historical Park. Nabby later died of breast cancer, having endured three years of severe pain.
  • 1785
    After 1785, she filled the role of wife of the first U.S. minister to the Court of St James's (Britain).
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1784
    In 1784, she and her daughter Nabby joined her husband and her eldest son, John Quincy, at her husband's diplomatic post in Paris.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1773
    Adams was responsible for family and farm when her husband was on his long trips. "Alas!", she wrote in December 1773, "How many snow banks divide thee and me."
    More Details Hide Details She raised her two younger sons throughout John's prolonged absences. She also raised her elder grandchildren, including George Washington Adams and a younger John Adams, while John Quincy Adams was minister to Russia. Her childrearing style included relentless and continual reminders of what the children owed to virtue and the Adams tradition. As the mother of John Quincy Adams, she was the first First Lady to also be the mother of a President.
  • 1764
    Although Adams' father approved of the match, her mother was appalled that her daughter would marry a country lawyer whose manner still reeked of the farm, but eventually she gave in.The couple married on October 25, 1764, in the Smiths' home in Weymouth.
    More Details Hide Details Smith, Abigails' father performed the ceremony. After the reception, the couple mounted a single horse and rode off to their new home, the small cottage and farm John had inherited from his father in Braintree, Massachusetts. Later they moved to Boston, where his law practice expanded. In 10 years, she gave birth to six children:
    In 1764 Smith presided over the marriage of John Adams and his daughter.
    More Details Hide Details In July of 1775 his wife Elizabeth, with whom he had been married for 33 years, died of smallpox. In 1784, at age 77, Smith died.
  • 1762
    As third cousins, Abigail and John had known each other since they were children. In 1762, John accompanied his friend Richard Cranch to the Smith household.
    More Details Hide Details Cranch was engaged to Adams' older sister, Mary, and would be the parents of federal judge William Cranch. John was quickly attracted to the petite, shy, 17-year-old brunette who was forever bent over some book. He was surprised to learn she knew so much about poetry, philosophy and politics.
  • 1744
    Smith married Elizabeth Quincy in 1742, and together they had four children, including three daughters: one born in 1743, Abigail born in 1744 and another born in 1745.
    More Details Hide Details Their only son, born in 1746, died of alcoholism in 1787.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)