Akosua Busia
Ghanaian actor
Akosua Busia
Akosua Gyamama Busia is a Ghanaian actress who now lives in the U.S..
Biography
Akosua Busia's personal information overview.
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Relationships
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News
News abour Akosua Busia from around the web
THE COLOR PURPLE Blu-ray Review - Collider.com
Google News - over 5 years
Goldberg also shines as tears roll down her face and she struggles through the hardships of raising Miser's several kids in the midst of being separated from her younger sister Nettie (Akosua Busia). Time passes until we're eventually introduced to
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Google News article
FILM REVIEW; No Peace From A Brutal Legacy
NYTimes - over 18 years
The pivotal event in ''Beloved'' is the arrival of a breathtaking apparition. A beautiful young woman dressed in mourning is washed up on a riverbank, caught in a trancelike state on the verge of drowning. In the most exquisitely strange moments of Jonathan Demme's transfixing, deeply felt adaptation of Toni Morrison's novel, this creature seems
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NYTimes article
Corrections
NYTimes - over 18 years
An article on May 17 about disputes over credit for movie screenplays misstated the surname of a woman who wrote a screen adaptation of the Toni Morrison novel ''Beloved.'' She is Akosua Busia, not Ufia.
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NYTimes article
FILM; How Many Writers Does It Take . . . ?
NYTimes - almost 19 years
WHEN moviegoers see the screenwriting credit for ''The Horse Whisperer'' -- ''written by Eric Roth and Richard LaGravenese'' -- they may envision a team working cozily together, one partner banging the keys while the other paces the room. Two creative people united in both labor and spirit. But the truth is that these men were never in the same
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NYTimes article
TV WEEKEND;Gus and Woodrow: The Early Years
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Larry McMurtry has parlayed his best-selling 1985 novel into a small industry. In 1989, CBS's eight-hour television version of the book was an enormous success in ratings and reviews. Two sequels followed: the unauthorized "Return to Lonesome Dove," pushed by an eager CBS, and Mr. McMurtry's officially sanctioned "Streets of Laredo," based on his
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NYTimes article
Review/Theater; A Difficult Birth For 'Mule Bone'
NYTimes - about 26 years
IF ever there was a promising idea for a play, it is the enigmatic story of what went on when two giants of the Harlem Renaissance briefly collided in 1930 to collaborate on "a comedy of Negro life" they titled "Mule Bone." The writers were the poet Langston Hughes and the anthropologist, folklorist and novelist Zora Neale Hurston. Both were in
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NYTimes article
THEATER; Why the 'Mule Bone' Debate Goes On
NYTimes - about 26 years
Controversy over the play "Mule Bone" has existed ever since it was written by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston in 1930. Not only did an authors' quarrel prevent the play from being produced, but its exclusive use of black folk vernacular has also provoked debate. In 1984, when the play became part of the publishing project of Dr. Henry Louis
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NYTimes article
Reel After Reel Of Festival Films, Current and Classic
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: LIKE a reel of film that just popped its sprockets, movie festivals are springing up at such a furious pace that it's almost impossible to stay abreast of them. This weekend, the offerings include the opening of Perspectives on French Cinema and an adjunct retrospective of Louis Malle's French films at the Museum of Modern Art; the
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NYTimes article
Review/Film; The World in Very Big Trouble
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: ''The Omen'' isn't exactly one of the 10,000 best movies of all time, but it still towers above ''The Seventh Sign,'' which also claims as its inspiration Revelation, the New Testament's apocalyptic, final book, written, according to the Columbia Encyclopedia, by ''one John'' in A.D. 95. ''The Omen'' isn't exactly one of the 10,000 best
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NYTimes article
SCREEN: 'NATIVE SON,' BASED ON WRIGHT'S NOVEL
NYTimes - about 30 years
BIGGER THOMAS, the 19-year-old hero of Richard Wright's seminal 1940 novel, ''Native Son,'' is not easy to take either as a character or as a man, but he's a figure of mythic proportions. He's a mountain in the flat literary landscape that surrounds him. Raised in black poverty in the greatly depressed Chicago of the 1930's, Bigger is unrelenting
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NYTimes article
PROBLEMS OF FILMING ' NATIVE SON'
NYTimes - about 30 years
How do you make a movie out of ''Native Son''? Richard Wright's book, which was published in 1940, is still assigned in hundreds of high school and college classes. It has now been made into a movie, which opens Wednesday in New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. The first commercially successful novel in which a black writer confronted white America
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Akosua Busia
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