Albert Finney
Actor
Albert Finney
Albert Finney is an English actor. Beginning in the theatre, Finney was especially successful in plays by William Shakespeare before he switched to films. He achieved prominence in films in the early 1960s, his debut being The Entertainer, directed by Tony Richardson, who had directed him in theatre plays various times before. He became a leading Free Cinema figure, and and has maintained a successful career in theatre, film and television.
Biography
Albert Finney's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Albert Finney from around the web
CultureZohn: I Spent New Year's Eve In Bed With Warren Beatty
Huffington Post - about 2 months
Ok, so you know the drill by now. I'm home, it's almost 2017, and I need to crawl into bed with someone exciting, sexy, dynamic, legendary, to lift myself up over the hulking mess of New Year's Eve. This year, I knew had to think big, really really big, especially big, to face down the looming disaster of 45. I combed the bestseller list for a Keith Richards or Richard Burton-equivalent (my previous NY eve boon companions), and all I could come up with was Bruce Springsteen and Robbie Robertson and no offense, I've never been a Bruce babe and as much as I like Music from Big Pink, after seeing the Scorcese docu I found Robbie a wee bit self-important and limelight-stealing from his fellow Band members. As I was pondering this biggest of date nights, Carrie Fisher died, and I, like many others, rewound her career and came upon her first acting gig in Shampoo, and there he was staring me in the face. Warren! Warren could help me enter 2017 and get me some moxie back: if anyone ...
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Huffington Post article
Buck Up. The Denver Holiday Season is Upon Us
Huffington Post - about 1 year
The Denver holiday season is upon us, a time when the darkest days lean toward the light, and heaven knows we need it. The past month tempts me to turn off the news, flop on the couch and Kurl up with the Kardashians. Hard times call for desperate measures but I'm craving a more fulfilling escape. Something sweet. Something magical. Something with the power to remind me of more innocent times and feel better about the state of mankind. I need a miracle. I'll start with a stroll through the lights, lots of 'em. Denver Zoo has doubled the size of the Zoo Lights and if the weather allows me to feel my fingers, perhaps my heart will melt a bit, warmed by the artistry and cocoa.Charles Dickens favorite ghost story, A Christmas Carol, haunts the Denver Center once more. This year's wassail will be just a bit sweeter as Philip Pleasants takes his bow as Ebenezer Scrooge. Delighting Denver audiences for the past eleven years, Pleasants feels it's time to put the Ghost of Christmas Past ...
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Huffington Post article
Gerald McEwan, Miss Marple Actress, Dies at 82
NYTimes - about 2 years
Ms. McEwan was a British stage regular, appearing with Laurence Olivier, Albert Finney and other stars before taking the television role as Agatha Christie’s detective.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
REVIEW: Broadway's <i>Big Fish</i>
Huffington Post - over 3 years
A father tells his life story as a tailored fairy tale. Initially his young son believes the mythic larger-than-life stories -- but as time goes on the boy questions whether or not he's being led on. Only at the end does the now-grown son recognize that his father truly lived a big life and the added flair never mattered. That's a brief overview of Big Fish, the movie-inspired musical that opened up at the Neil Simon Theater on October 6. However, it's also a reflection of the music and lyrics written by Andrew Lippa (Adams Family, Wild Party). The musical opens with the catchiest tune of the show -- a big dance number that features a mermaid, giant, witch and every other character we've yet to formally meet. Subsequently, the score provides only enough to keep the audience engaged up to the show's beautiful, tearjerking finale. Adapted from the 1998 novel by Daniel Wallace and 2003 Tim Burton film, Big Fish follows the adventures of Edward Bloom (Norbert Leo Butz), a natural bo ...
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Huffington Post article
John Farr: Thank God For The Coen Brothers!
Huffington Post - over 3 years
At a time when most every big Hollywood release is a re-make, or has a number after it, or involves superheroes out of comic books, or comes from the inside of a computer, I'm grateful for the Coen Brothers. At a time when a movie like "Django Unchained" can earn a Best Screenplay Oscar, I'm grateful for the Coen Brothers. At a time when a director insists on putting hip-hop music into a Roaring Twenties period picture, I'm grateful for the Coen Brothers. Just why am I grateful? Well, let me count the ways. 1) They love and respect older films. (You knew I'd like that, right?) Supposedly, Joel went on record that "The Guns Of Navarone" is his favorite film. They even appreciate Doris Day movies-only the good ones, of course. (And guess where they got the title for "O Brother, Where Art Thou?") 2) At least partly influenced by their reverence for the classics, they place great value on stories and scripts. And it shows. Even with their misfires (which are few ...
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Huffington Post article
Rex Reed: Message To 'Orphans': Bring Back Albert Finney
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Overwrought and odd, the Broadway revival of Orphans, a 1985 off-Broadway play by Lyle Kessler that was overrated by a lot of otherwise intelligent people, including director Alan J. Pakula, who turned it into a 1987 movie with Albert Finney, has gained nothing from time passed. If anything, it is odder and more inconsequential than ever. But it still attracts actors, including the trio at center stage of the current production, led by the inexhaustible Alec Baldwin. This is the one about male bonding between two feral brothers, living alone since childhood in an abandoned house in North Philadelphia, and a derelict they tie up as a potential kidnap victim who turns the tables by taking over their lives, their home and their wacko values by assuming the role of a fairy godfather/surrogate patriarch. Treat (Ben Foster) is the aggressive older sibling, a petty thief who grifts, robs and knifes innocent strangers to provide for his younger brother Phillip (Tom Sturridge), an i ...
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Huffington Post article
One For The Table: Our Favorite Movie Food Scenes
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
We received a letter from a reader telling us how how much she loved the scene in Desk Set (a film that Amy Ephron's parents' wrote) where Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy make fried chicken and floating island! And since it's Oscar Season, it inspired us to ask some of our contributors what their favorite food scenes in movies are... Anjelica Huston Favorite food scene! I won't say it was the Dead, which involved sitting in front of fish-fed goose for three weeks! I would have to say Tom Jones, the scene where Joyce Redman and Albert Finney eat Lobster.... Amy Ephron The scene in Ron Howard's Splash where Daryl Hannah attacks the shellfish in the fancy restaurant mermaid-style and the scene in Big where Tom Hanks razor nibbles the baby ears of corn the way a kid would. In character, ingenious and hilarious in both instances. Lynda Resnick I guess the most memorable food scene in movies for me is from What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? when Jane serves her sister' ...
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Huffington Post article
Helene Cohen Bludman: My Celebrity Crush: Forever In Love With Audrey
The Huffington Post - about 4 years
In 'Two for the Road' and her other movies, Audrey Hepburn's style and grace fill the screen. In her life, she brought light and joy to millions. She and Albert Finney made me fall in love with them and with great movies. Read More... More on Movies
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The Huffington Post article
How Alan Parker progressed to Bafta's top table
Guardian (UK) - about 4 years
The varied and brilliant career of the director of Bugsy Malone and Fame is to be celebrated by a Bafta fellowship From the custard pie guns of Bugsy Malone to the legwarmers of Fame; from the prison brutality of Midnight Express to the unalloyed musical joy of The Commitments – the career of Alan Parker in all its variety and brilliance is to be celebrated by a Bafta fellowship next month. Parker, 68, follows in the footsteps of Martin Scorsese, Stanley Kubrick and Elizabeth Taylor in receiving the honour. It is the British Academy of Film and Television Arts' equivalent to a lifetime achievement award, but the director is not worried about the signals that accepting such an award might send. "I'm honoured by the award – flattered, really," he said on Tuesday. "A lot of people deserve it more than I do. I know film-makers who have refused these sort of things, thinking it means they're never going to work again. "But in the end, you get to a certain age, you've made a number of f ...
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Guardian (UK) article
'Big Fish' Musical Lands A Broadway Theater
Huffington Post - about 4 years
NEW YORK — The musical of "Big Fish" starring two-time Tony Award winner Norbert Leo Butz has reeled in a Broadway theater. Producers said Monday that the new show will open in early October at the Neil Simon Theatre. Previews begin September 5 following a tune-up in Chicago this April and May. Five-time Tony Award winner Susan Stroman will direct and choreograph the musical, based on the Daniel Wallace novel and the 2003 Tim Burton-directed film starring Ewan McGregor and Albert Finney. The musical's book will be by John August, who wrote the movie's screenplay. Butz, last seen opposite Katie Homes on Broadway, will be joined by Kate Baldwin, Bobby Steggert, Krystal Joy Brown and Zachary Unger.
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Huffington Post article
Martin Newman: Jack Reacher Is Kicking Ass at the Box Office but What Are the Best Ever Movie Punch-Ups?
Huffington Post - about 4 years
In new action blockbuster Jack Reacher, Tom Cruise is surrounded by thugs when he gives a calm, chilling appraisal of their situation: "Remember, you wanted this". What comes next is a predictable staple of just about every Hollywood action flick made today. And in a market crowded with such franchises, making these fight scenes bigger and badder than anything before is a continual challenge for writers and choreographers. But what really makes a memorable movie punch-up? The James Bond films set a standard for the tough-guy butt-kicker and since the advent of Hong Kong martial arts movies the model has been refined and reiterated over the decades. New film franchises like the Die Hard, Mission Impossible, Matrix, Batman and Bourne series have kept the box office ticking over. But they have also become dangerously generic. Whether it's Daniel Craig or Matt Damon you always know the brutal outcome. They are heroes who don't break a sweat enroute to battering ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Mark Simpson: Swishy Villainy And Psychodrama In 'Skyfall'
Huffington Post - about 4 years
When, at their first meeting in the latest Bond "outing," Skyfall, a rather forward Raoul Silva, played by a bleached-blond Javier Bardem, takes caddish advantage of James Bond's indisposition (tied as he is to a chair), running his hands over 007's craggy face, ripped chest and powerful thighs and flirtatiously suggesting, "Well, first time for everything, Bond," you could feel the audience in my local cinema freeze. And when Bond delivers his now-famous, laconic retort, "What makes you think it's my first time?" you could hear the audience's sharp intake of breath over the THX sound system. "Wot?! James Bond, a bender?!" "Oh, bloody hell!" I wanted to shout out, at Silva, at the audience and at the world in general. "Has anyone been paying attention? Of course it's not Bond's first time! In Casino Royale Bond tried a spot of CBT with Mr. Big and his knotted rope, while tied to a rim chair!" In 2006 Casino Royale rebooted and updated the tired, terminally naff Bond ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Review: 'Skyfall'
Calabasas Patch - over 4 years
  OMG! Can it really be 50 years since Sean Connery crouched, swiveled and pointed his gun at us in the opening credits of Dr. No? The world has changed drastically since then, the only constant being that Queen Elizabeth II was already ensconced on the throne.  To bring some closure to the iconic status that James Bond has maintained in the world of “pop” movie culture, her Royal Majesty even agreed to a cameo in the opening ceremonies of the London Olympics, allowing herself to be escorted to the stadium via helicopter by 007 himself. So there! The vast franchise that Ian Flemming’s novels have set loose on the big screen over the past half-century have always been border-line if not outright of the Marvel comic-book type: half-mad megalomaniacs, masochistic tortured souls in all shapes, colors and sizes, out to destroy freedom, democracy and, of course, Mr. Bond himself. What sets the Skyfall apart from what came before is the more sobered and sobering world that James B ...
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Calabasas Patch article
Jackie K. Cooper: Skyfall Is the Best Bond? Not So Fast!
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Skyfall has been deemed by many to be the "best Bond yet." But not so fast. Although this twenty-third film in the Bond series is a very good movie, let's not get carried away. This is Daniel Craig's third Bond film. He hit a high with Casino Royale but was a letdown in Quantum of Solace. It seems the makers of these movies are still trying to decide exactly who Craig's James Bond is. In Skyfall he starts off as a man with a mission, and it ends with his death. At least others think he is dead, including his boss "M" (Judi Dench). She sells his flat and writes his obituary, and then he reappears live and doing fine. M is happy to have him back but others are skeptical of whether or not he is fit for duty. This includes M's colleague Gareth Mallory (Ralph Fiennes). At this point Bond appears to be a little scruffy and haunted by his past. As the movie moves forward we get a chance to see if Bond is back and better than ever or if he still has a past to overcome. Luckily f ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Caryn James: Skyfall: Bond Is Older, Wiser, Better
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Daniel Craig looks craggier than ever in Skyfall, which is part of the film's sly, obvious-yet-effective theme. Without slowing down the intricate, explosive action that defines a Bond movie, director Sam Mendes and a sharper-than-usual screenplay create a story in which Bond is feeling his middle-age; gizmo-happy Q is a young computer-whiz played by Ben Whishaw; and in this new world where terrorist threats arrive on your hacked laptop, M -- played once more and quite touchingly by Judi Dench -- is considered an old fart. Ha! It's not shocking to find that Bond and M still have their edge, but there are other, better surprises. Mendes handles the action expertly, but he is a character-driven director (American Beauty, Revolutionary Road) and the relationships in Skyfall are so much richer than in previous Bonds that we actually get to see his childhood home -- an isolated old pile in Scotland. In a suitable tribute to the 50-year-old franchise's own middle age, all t ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Daniel Craig's Bond witty, not wordy
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
Daniel Craig's Bond witty, not wordy [...] after his turns in "Casino Royale" (2006) and "Quantum of Solace" (2008), nobody does it better. [...] Craig, 44, is back in "Skyfall," directed by Sam Mendes ("American Beauty") and featuring a cast of heavyweights, including Javier Bardem, Ralph Fiennes, Albert Finney and Judi Dench. In this outing, Bond is after the usual flamboyant villain (Bardem) who has an unusual ambition - not world domination but the destruction of Bond's boss, M (Dench). The action takes place all over the globe, of course, though the heaviest of it hits close to home. The film represents an upgrade, the Bond app given a shiny new interface and functionality it had lost in previous iterations (the old wit is back) plus some new features (like real characters, especially the women). The best Bond movie we could make. The trap is making it bigger without making it better. There was a writers strike, and we had half a script, and it had a g ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
Graham Milne: Counting Down to Skyfall: Dr. No
Huffington Post - over 4 years
It's been a bit of a dry spell for us fans of James Bond of late, a drought not seen since the dreaded 1989-1995 hiatus when a combination of lawsuits, hostile takeovers and general public ennui made it seem like 007 had had his day. The financial woes of the legendary MGM have kept Bond off the big screen since 2008, but as anyone who's seen the trailers for Skyfall can attest, he's ready to roar back in a big way, with Academy Award-winning director Sam Mendes at the helm and a powerhouse A-list cast including the likes of Javier Bardem, Ralph Fiennes and Albert Finney. It occurred to me this morning that there are 24 days until the movie is released here in North America, and that there have been 24 James Bond films preceding this one (if you include the "non-official" 1967 Casino Royale and Never Say Never Again). What better way to celebrate this new Bond than to review one 007 adventure a day culminating with a take on Skyfall (because you know I'll be there on openin ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Albert Finney
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 74
    In May 2011, Finney disclosed that he had been receiving treatment for kidney cancer.
    More Details Hide Details Finney turned down the offer of a CBE in 1980 and a knighthood in 2000. He has criticised the honours system for "perpetuating snobbery". He has five Oscar nominations but has never won. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor four times, for Tom Jones (1963), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Dresser (1983), and Under the Volcano (1984); and was nominated for Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Erin Brockovich (2000). Julia Roberts mentioned Albert Finney in her Oscar acceptance speech for Best Actress in Erin Brockovich, thanking him and sharing the Oscar with him. Finney has 13 BAFTA nominations (9 film, 4 TV), winning two: In addition Finney received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2001. He won an Emmy Award, for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Made for TV Movie, for his performance as Winston Churchill in HBO's The Gathering Storm. He had previously been nominated for the HBO telefilm The Image (1990).
  • 2002
    Age 65
    In 2002 his critically acclaimed portrayal of Winston Churchill in The Gathering Storm won him BAFTA and Emmy awards as Best Actor.
    More Details Hide Details He also played the title role in the television series My Uncle Silas, based on the short stories by H. E. Bates, about a roguish but lovable poacher-cum-farm labourer looking after his great-nephew. The show ran for two series from 2000 until 2003.
  • FORTIES
  • 1986
    Age 49
    He won an Olivier Award for Orphans in 1986 and has won three Evening Standard Theatre Awards for Best Actor.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1974
    Age 37
    During this period, one of his high-profile film roles was as Agatha Christie's Belgian master detective Hercule Poirot in the 1974 film Murder On The Orient Express.
    More Details Hide Details Finney became so well known for the role that he complained that it typecast him for a number of years. "People really do think I am 300 pounds with a French accent" he said. While being known for his dramatic roles, Finney appeared and sang in two musical films: Scrooge and the Hollywood film version of Annie, which was directed by John Huston, who would direct him once again in Under The Volcano two years later. He also sings in Tim Burton's Corpse Bride. Finney made several television productions for the BBC in the 1990s, including The Green Man (1990), based on a novel by Kingsley Amis, the acclaimed drama A Rather English Marriage (1998) (with Tom Courtenay), and the lead role in Dennis Potter's final two plays, Karaoke and Cold Lazarus in 1996 and 1997. In the latter he played a frozen, disembodied head.
  • 1970
    Age 33
    From 1970 to 1978, he was married to French actress Anouk Aimée.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1963
    Age 26
    The success of Tom Jones saw British exhibitors vote Finney the ninth most popular star at the box office in 1963.
    More Details Hide Details After Charlie Bubbles (1968), which he also directed, his film appearances became less frequent as he focused more on acting on stage.
    This led to a series of "Angry Young Man" roles in kitchen sink dramas, before he starred in the Academy Award-winning 1963 film Tom Jones.
    More Details Hide Details Prior to this, Finney had been chosen to play T. E. Lawrence in David Lean's production of Lawrence of Arabia after a successful, and elaborate, screen-test that took four days to shoot. However, Finney baulked at signing a multi-year contract for producer Sam Spiegel and chose not to accept the role.
  • 1959
    Age 22
    Then in 1959 he appeared at Stratford in Coriolanus, replacing a sick Laurence Olivier (as Coriolanus).
    More Details Hide Details His first film appearance was a role in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960), with Laurence Olivier, but he made his breakthrough with his portrayal of a disillusioned factory worker in Karel Reisz's film version of Alan Sillitoe's Saturday Night and Sunday Morning.
  • 1958
    Age 21
    A lifelong supporter of Manchester United, Finney narrated the documentary Munich, about the aircrash that killed most of the Busby Babes in 1958, which was shown on United's TV channel MUTV in February 2008.
    More Details Hide Details By his first wife, Jane Wenham, he has a son, Simon, who works in the film industry as a camera operator.
    Finney graduated from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and became a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company. His career began in the theatre; he made his first appearance on the London stage in 1958 in Jane Arden's The Party, directed by Charles Laughton, who starred in the production along with his wife, Elsa Lanchester.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1936
    Born
    Born in 1936.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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