Amy Lowell
US writer
Amy Lowell
Amy Lawrence Lowell was an American poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
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Amy Lowell's personal information overview.
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Finding reasons to believe in reincarnation - Biddeford Journal Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
Renowned American poet Amy Lowell passed away on May 12, 1925, the very same day Yogi Berra was born in St. Louis, Missouri. Could the chunky, cigar-smoking, Pulitzer Prize-winning imagist who wrote several memorable poems about drinking (“Vintage” and
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Long-awaited Leverett Circle pedestrian overpass is on the way - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
And when Frank DePaola, MassDOT's acting highway administrator finally made the announcement earlier this week about plans to build a pedestrian bridge over Leverett Circle, most of the 30 or so audience members at the Amy Lowell House stood up in a
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Your weekly guide to Houston: Naughty opera, modern homes and happy vegetables - CultureMap Houston
Google News - over 5 years
Inspired by the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Amy Lowell and William Blake, baritone Michael Walsh and sopranos Alison Greene and Natasha Manley will premiere new works, including a composition by Dominick DiOrio. Friday at 7 pm Have ideas worth spreading
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Overhearing Joe Feuerherd - National Catholic Reporter (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
This was not the oppressive "silence" that poet Amy Lowell described as filling "a house on the morning after death," but an interlude crackling with electricity, seeking to ground itself to illuminate the depths of their freshly uncovered emotions
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365 Days of Art:The LaBa! Street Art Festival Returns - AfricanColours.com
Google News - almost 6 years
As Amy Lowell (1874 - 1925) once said : “Art is the desire of a man to express himself, to record the reactions of his personality to the world he lives in” , The LaBa! Street Art Festival 2011 will make it happen! Entrance is free, with secure and
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A Lost EE Cummings Poem Discovered - The Awl
Google News - almost 6 years
The poet Amy Lowell, a skeptic of both The Dial and Cummings' work, bet Thayer $100 that Cummings would not ascend to the pantheon of American poets. The Dial's success came at a great cost to Thayer. The magazine never made a profit, and at one point
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Simsbury family makes music together - Foothills Media Group
Google News - almost 6 years
She will perform with saxophonist Carrie Koffman on “Orpheus Singing” and with mezz- soprano Amy Champagne on “Dreams in War Time,” based on the words of Amy Lowell. Both Koffman and Champagne are faculty members at Hartt School of Music,
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San Francisco Choral Artists form new music for voices, strings - San Francisco Examiner
Google News - almost 6 years
The program begins with Gandolfi's “Winter Light,” a work that transforms two poems by Amy Lowell, “Falling Snow” and “Opal,” into lovely snapshots of nature. The nature theme continues with Chihara's “Clair de lune.” “I think he's a brilliant composer
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Miller Williams proclaimed Fayetteville 2011 Poet Laureate | Announcement - Ozarks Unbound
Google News - almost 6 years
Williams has authored over twenty-five books and won several awards for his poetry, including the National Arts Award, Amy Lowell Traveling Fellowship in Poetry, and the Poets' Prize. He helped found the University of Arkansas Press, and he served as
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Miller Williams named Poet Laureate of Fayetteville - Fayetteville Flyer
Google News - almost 6 years
He has authored over 25 books and won several awards for his poetry, including the Amy Lowell traveling scholarship (1963), Arts Fund Award (1973), Prix de Rome (1976), and the Poets' Prize (1990). In 1997, Williams was selected by President Bill
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Tripping To and Fro, Happily Skewering Poetry
NYTimes - over 8 years
BALLISTICS By Billy Collins 112 pages. Random House. $24. The poem is called ''Old Man Eating Alone in a Chinese Restaurant.'' It is about an old man preparing to eat rice and shredded beef alone in a restaurant called Chang's. Accuse Billy Collins of fanciful charm if you must, but never say that he fails to give reality its due. And acknowledge
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Il Miglior Fabbro
NYTimes - about 9 years
EZRA POUND: POET A Portrait of the Man and His Work. Volume I: The Young Genius, 1885-1920. By A. David Moody. Illustrated. 507 pp. Oxford University Press. $47.95. T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound were the ''Odd Couple'' of 20th-century poetry, a most unlikely pair who between them rewrote the rules for everyone else. Eliot was Felix, of course: fussy,
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MUSIC REVIEW | YOUNG PEOPLE$(RSQUO$)S CHORUS OF NEW YORK CITY; Hitting All the Stops and High Notes of a Subway Ride
NYTimes - over 9 years
There is a lot to be said for children's choirs, both in musical terms -- when they are at their best, they produce a pure tone that adult choirs cannot match -- and in terms of the social relationships they foster, to say nothing of the affinity for performance they create among their young charges. Francisco J. Núñez, who directs the Young
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The Spirit of Ol' Ez
NYTimes - almost 10 years
To the Editor: Both David Orr's apt critique of The New Yorker (''Annals of Poetry,'' March 11) and Dana Goodyear's excellent New Yorker article about Poetry magazine would have us believe that the battle for poetry's survival is being waged in the pages of magazines with, respectively, millions of subscribers or millions of dollars in Eli Lilly
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ESSAY; Annals of Poetry
NYTimes - almost 10 years
The history of American poetry, like the history of America itself, is a story of ingenuity, sacrifice, hard work and sticking it to people when they least expect it. Whether it's Ezra Pound dismissing his benefactor Amy Lowell as a ''hippopoetess'' or Yvor Winters accusing his friend Hart Crane of possessing flaws akin to a ''public catastrophe,''
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Paid Notice: Deaths SCHNEIDERMAN, MIRIAM
NYTimes - over 12 years
SCHNEIDERMAN -- Miriam. Beloved wife of the late Morris. Devoted sister of the late Benjamin and Elihu Brillson. Adored mother of Arthur, Steven, Paul, Judy, Helaine, and Bette. Cherished grandmother and great-grandmother of Susan, Adam, David, Sheri, Debra, Jonathan, Stuart, Sheila, Andrew, Scott, Amy, Lowell, Austin, Matthew, Jordyn, Sydnie, and
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; The Actress Who Became the Original 'Doozy'
NYTimes - over 13 years
ELEONORA DUSE A Biography By Helen Sheehy Illustrated. 380 pages. Alfred A. Knopf. $32.50. Fourteen years younger than her great rival, the flamboyantly romantic Sarah Bernhardt, Eleonora Duse was ''the first modern actor,'' says Helen Sheehy in her new biography. As such, Duse stressed a subtle but profound emotional identification with her
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Waking Each Other Up
NYTimes - over 13 years
THE GREAT WAVE Gilded Age Misfits, Japanese Eccentrics, and the Opening of Old Japan. By Christopher Benfey. Illustrated. 332 pp. New York: Random House. $25.95. SO insular was Japan during the two and a half centuries of the Tokugawa shogunate that leaving the country was a crime punishable by death. Merchants from China and the Netherlands, the
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Paid Notice: Deaths ROSENBERG, RUTH
NYTimes - almost 14 years
ROSENBERG - Ruth, died April 21, 2003. Beloved wife of the late Emanuel. Devoted mother of Judy Schneiderman and Stephen & Harriet Rosenberg. Loving grandmother of Susan & Adam Eitelberg, David & Sheri Schneiderman, Marc & Ava Rosenberg, Bonnie & Evan Rayman and Evan Rosenberg. Adored Bubbe of Amy, Lowell, Julie, Kayla, Saige, Joshua and Carly.
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Amy Lowell
    FIFTIES
  • 1925
    Age 51
    Lowell died of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1925, at the age of 51.
    More Details Hide Details The following year, she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for What's O'Clock. That collection included the patriotic poem "Lilacs", which Louis Untermeyer said was the poem of hers he liked best.
  • FORTIES
  • 1917
    Age 43
    Though she sometimes wrote sonnets, Lowell was an early adherent to the "free verse" method of poetry and one of the major champions of this method. She defined it in her preface to "Sword Blades and Poppy Seed"; in the North American Review for January, 1917; in the closing chapter of "Tendencies in Modern American Poetry"; and also in the Dial (January 17, 1918), as: "The definition of Vers libre is: a verse-formal based upon cadence.
    More Details Hide Details To understand vers libre, one must abandon all desire to find in it the even rhythm of metrical feet. One must allow the lines to flow as they will when read aloud by an intelligent reader. Or, to put it another way, unrhymed cadence is "built upon 'organic rhythm,' or the rhythm of the speaking voice with its necessity for breathing, rather than upon a strict metrical system. Free verse within its own law of cadence has no absolute rules; it would not be 'free' if it had." Untermeyer writes that "she was not only a disturber but an awakener." In many poems, Lowell dispenses with line breaks, so that the work looks like prose on the page. This technique she labeled "polyphonic prose". Throughout her working life, Lowell was a promoter of both contemporary and historical poets. Her book Fir-Flower Poets was a poetical re-working of literal translations of the works of ancient Chinese poets, notably Li Tai-po (A.D. 701-762). Her writing also included critical works on French literature. At the time of her death, she was attempting to complete her two-volume biography of John Keats. Writing of Keats, Lowell said that "the stigma of oddness is the price a myopic world always exacts of genius."
  • THIRTIES
  • 1912
    Age 38
    The first published collection of her poetry, A Dome of Many-Coloured Glass, appeared two years later, in 1912.
    More Details Hide Details An additional group of uncollected poems was added to the volume The Complete Poetical Works of Amy Lowell, published in 1955 with an introduction by Louis Untermeyer, who considered himself her friend.
  • 1910
    Age 36
    Her first published work appeared in 1910 in Atlantic Monthly.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1902
    Age 28
    She never attended college because her family did not consider it proper for a woman to do so. She compensated for this lack with avid reading and near-obsessive book collecting. She lived as a socialite and travelled widely, turning to poetry in 1902 (age 28) after being inspired by a performance of Eleonora Duse in Europe.
    More Details Hide Details Lowell was said to be lesbian, and in 1912 she and actress Ada Dwyer Russell were reputed to be lovers. Russell is reputed to be the subject of Lowell's more erotic works, most notably the love poems contained in 'Two Speak Together', a subsection of Pictures of the Floating World. The two women traveled to England together, where Lowell met Ezra Pound, who at once became a major influence and a major critic of her work. Pound considered Lowell's embrace of Imagism to be a kind of hijacking of the movement. Lowell has been linked romantically to writer Mercedes de Acosta, but the only evidence of any contact between them is a brief correspondence about a planned memorial for Duse. Lowell was a short but imposing figure who kept her hair in a bun and wore a pince-nez. Lowell smoked cigars constantly, claiming that they lasted longer than cigarettes. She was associated with her cigar-smoking habit publicly, since newspapers frequently mentioned it. A glandular problem kept her perpetually overweight, so that poet Witter Bynner once said, in a cruel comment repeated by Ezra Pound and thereafter commonly misattributed to him, that she was a "hippopoetess." Her admirers defended her, however, even after her death. One rebuttal was written by Heywood Broun in his obituary tribute to Amy. He wrote, "She was upon the surface of things a Lowell, a New Englander and a spinster.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1874
    Age 0
    Born on February 9, 1874.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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