Anthony Salerno
American mobster
Anthony Salerno
Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno was a New York mobster who served as front boss of the Genovese crime family to family boss Vincent "The Chin" Gigante from the 1970s until his conviction in 1986. Usually seen wearing a fedora hat and chomping on a cigar, he was nicknamed "Fat Tony" due to his size.
Biography
Anthony Salerno's personal information overview.
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News
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Wild stock market could make you eat more - msnbc.com
Google News - over 5 years
News of the stock market crash or high unemployment levels might activate a "survival mindset," said study researcher Anthony Salerno, a doctoral student in the department of marketing at the University of Miami. Having this mindset means that people
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Undersheriff is the apple of committee's eye - Albany Times Union
Google News - over 5 years
Apple was among three candidates vetted by the candidate committee -- the other two being Jim Horton, an assistant director at the state Office of Counter Terrorism and retired State Police major crimes investigator, and Anthony Salerno,
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Recovered alcoholic DPW worker charges Leonia with discrimination - Cliffviewpilot.com
Google News - over 5 years
McKee said he injured his left thigh in the incident, which he said was witnessed by a co-worker, Anthony Salerno. Leonia Police Officer Eduardo Millan, who took the report, said he accompanied McKee to Terhune's office to report the incident
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Google News article
Gunshots and fear taking a toll in Asbury - Asbury Park Press
Google News - over 5 years
Anthony Salerno said. “We know the names, but we need help from the public.'' And after a good stretch of relative calm on the affected streets, residents are scared — and disappointed. “Who's giving these kids guns?” said Joanne Johnson, 49,
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Google News article
Guns seized from Asbury Park man, 71, who police say may have supplied gang ... - Asbury Park Press
Google News - over 5 years
Anthony Salerno. Authorities said they also seized two body armor protective vests and a significant amount of ammunition and magazines. Just after 5:15 pm Wednesday, police raided Fentress' apartment at 1317 Washington Ave. Fentress, whose bail was
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Cops: Gun pointed at Asbury officer, 4 men arrested - Asbury Park Press
Google News - over 5 years
Anthony Salerno. Jones chased after the suspects but lost sight of them and put out a description of the men, who were then seen inside a white vehicle and stopped by Police Officer Craig Breiner, Salerno said. Inside the vehicle were Elza Inna, 20,
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Albany County sheriff candidate calls tape about police deception 'mudslinging' - Albany Times Union
Google News - over 5 years
Others are Albany detective Commander Tony Ryan; former State Police Senior Investigator James Horton and Anthony Salerno, a retired Albany police officer and former Altamont village police commissioner. In the 2005 story, Horton, a veteran homicide
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Many make bid for sheriff - Albany Times Union
Google News - over 5 years
Also mentioned as a potential candidate was Anthony Salerno, former Altamont public safety commissioner for five years and a former Albany police officer. The hierarchy of the county Democratic Party remained tightlipped Monday regarding those who
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Asbury Park man arrested, accused of breaking into unmarked cop car - Asbury Park Press
Google News - over 5 years
Anthony Salerno. Forensic evidence linked Robinson to the crime leading to the recovery of the hand-held radio, Salerno said. The three practice grenades have not been recovered, Salerno added. Robinson is charged with burglary and theft
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Google News article
Bobcats win pitching duel - Evening Sun (subscription)
Google News - almost 6 years
In the seventh, Delhi's Anthony Salerno hit a one-out double to put runners on second and third. Parsons then induced a groundout to third and a short bouncer in front of the plate that catcher Gordie Shields fielded and threw to Oefelein for the final
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Best Practices: Wellness Self-Management: An Adaptation of the Illness ... - Psychiatric Services (subscription)
Google News - almost 6 years
Anthony Salerno, Ph.D. , Paul Margolies, Ph.D. , Andrew Cleek, Psy.D. , Michele Pollock, MSW , Geetha Gopalan, Ph.D., LCSW and Carlos Jackson, Ph.D. Dr. Salerno is an assistant clinical professor of medical psychology, Department of Psychiatry,
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Asbury Park police chief on mission to build trust in department - Asbury Park Press
Google News - almost 6 years
Anthony Salerno said. There are two white and two black captains. There are two white lieutenants and four black lieutenants. Ten percent of the officers are female. "This is a dangerous profession, but it is a serious profession," Kinmon said
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Holmdel Environmental Commission Reviews Solar Farm Proposal - Patch.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Members Derek Dailey, Anthony Salerno, and alternate Kevin Soldo were absent. Two members of the public were in attendance. The Holmdel Zoning Board of Adjustment will hold an open, public meeting on the proposed solar farm on April 27 at 8 pm at Town
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Grand Opening and New Era for East Harlem Street
NYTimes - over 6 years
One August morning in 1882, a police officer discovered the body of a man in an empty lot on Pleasant Avenue in East Harlem. His clothes were covered in mud. His skull had been fractured, his throat cut. The stab wound was of such force that it penetrated to the spinal column. The police believed the man was a peddler who was the victim of a
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NYTimes article
Mob Informer Tells Court He's Gay, Crossing a Line
NYTimes - over 7 years
explicit rules -- that all made members of the mob are meant to follow: No beards. No sleeping with another gangster's wife. No cooperation with the government in accordance with ''omertà,'' the Mafia code of silence. But then there are those customs that are so engrained as part of the mob way that they never need to actually be spoken. High
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Paid Notice: Deaths SALERNO, ANTHONY
NYTimes - over 8 years
SALERNO--Anthony . November 9, 1947-November 16, 2008 Born in NYC in Misericordia Hospital to Ismaele (Sal) Salerno and Maria Luigia Tenaglia Salerno. He grew up in Astoria, Queens. A man of many talents. Mr. Salerno graduated from Fairfield University in 1973. He founded Healthcare Associates and is responsible for the creation of the Northeast
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Corrections: For the Record
NYTimes - about 9 years
An article on Saturday about the future of the Gambino crime family, whose entire leadership was arrested in federal raids last week, misidentified the boss of the Luchese family who was indicted in 1985 after a secret recording device placed in his Jaguar picked up incriminating conversations. It was Anthony Corallo, not Anthony Salerno. (Mr.
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After Raid, New Leaders May Emerge In Mob Family
NYTimes - about 9 years
With its structured chain of command, its varied revenue streams and its emphasis on maximizing earnings, the Mafia has always styled itself as a criminal version of Big Business. There is even an argument to be made that Cosa Nostra, as purists often call it, is one of America's most enduring industries, having been around for at least as long, if
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Lowest Bid Is a Problem For a College
NYTimes - over 9 years
The dilemma facing Westchester Community College is familiar to government agencies and private companies alike in an era of scarce resources and rapidly escalating construction costs. Eager to begin work on a $40.5 million center dedicated to preparing the county's growing immigrant population for professional careers, the college opened
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Anthony Salerno
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1992
    Age 80
    After his conviction and imprisonment, Salerno's health deteriorated because of his diabetes and suspected prostate cancer. In July 1992, Anthony Salerno died of a stroke at the Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Springfield, Missouri.
    More Details Hide Details He was buried at Saint Raymond's Cemetery in the Throggs Neck section of the Bronx in New York City. In the 2011 gangster movie Kill the Irishman, Salerno was portrayed by Paul Sorvino. The film depicts Salerno's role in the gangland war between the Cleveland crime family and Irish mob boss Danny Greene. Salerno helped inspire the The Simpsons character, Fat Tony.
  • 1986
    Age 74
    On November 19, 1986, Salerno was convicted on RICO charges.
    More Details Hide Details The following January, he was sentenced, along with six other defendants, to 100 years in prison.
    In October 1986, Fortune Magazine named the 75-year-old Salerno as America's top gangster in power, wealth and influence.
    More Details Hide Details For that reason, he was nominally the lead defendant in the trial. Many observers disputed Salerno's top ranking, claiming that law enforcement greatly exaggerated Salerno's importance to bring attention to their legal case against him. Salerno's bail request was denied and his attorneys appealed the decision all the way to the Supreme Court. However, in United States v. Salerno the Supreme Court ruled that he could be held without bail because of his potential danger to the community.
    In 1986, shortly after Salerno's conviction in the Commission Trial, Salerno's longtime right-hand man, Vincent "The Fish" Cafaro, told the FBI that Salerno was only a front for Gigante.
    More Details Hide Details Cafaro, who had by this time turned informer, also revealed that the Genovese family had been keeping up this ruse since 1969. However, investigators had missed several clues that Salerno wasn't the real boss before then. Most tellingly, an FBI bug captured a conversation in which Salerno and capo Matthew "Matty the Horse" Ianniello were reviewing a list of prospective candidates to be made in another family. Frustrated that the nicknames of the wannabes hadn't been included, Salerno shrugged and said, "I'll leave this up to the boss"—a clear sign that he was not the real leader of the family. Nonetheless, this revelation would not have been enough to endanger Salerno's conviction and sentence in the Commission Trial; he had been convicted of specific crimes and not merely of being a boss. In any event, his 70-year sentence in the separate racketeering trial would have assured that he would die in prison.
    While awaiting the Mafia Commission trial, Salerno was indicted on March 21, 1986 in a second federal racketeering indictment.
    More Details Hide Details The indictment accused Salerno of infiltrating concrete companies to control the construction of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and other Manhattan high-rise projects. Salerno was also accused of illegally aiding the election of Roy Lee Williams to the national presidency of the Teamsters Union. Salerno pleaded not guilty on all charges. He was convicted in 1988 and sentenced to 70 years in prison.
  • 1985
    Age 73
    On February 25, 1985, Salerno and eight other New York bosses on the "Mafia Commission" were indicted in the Mafia Commission Trial.
    More Details Hide Details The trial started in September 1986 and lasted three months.
  • 1981
    Age 69
    Over the years, Lombardo used several front bosses to hide his real status from law enforcement, a practice continued when Gigante took over the family upon Lombardo's retirement in 1981.
    More Details Hide Details When Gigante took over the family, he reduced Salerno to a mere soldier. However, Salerno soon became bored and wanted to return to his rackets, and Gigante agreed.
    After Salerno's recovery from his stroke and the March 31, 1981 death of Genovese front boss Frank Tieri, Salerno succeeded him.
    More Details Hide Details Although law enforcement at the time thought that Salerno was the boss of the Genovese family, it was an open secret in New York Mafia circles that Salerno was merely a front man for the real boss, Vincent "the Chin" Gigante. For instance, Alphonse "Little Al" D'Arco, who later became acting boss of the Lucchese crime family before turning informer, told investigators that when he became a Lucchese made man in 1982, he was told that Gigante was the boss of the Genovese family. Ever since the death of boss Vito Genovese in 1969, the real family leader had been Philip "Benny Squint" Lombardo.
    In early 1981, after his release from prison, Salerno suffered a mild stroke and retreated to his Rhinebeck estate to recuperate.
    More Details Hide Details At the time of his stroke, Salerno was Genovese underboss.
  • 1978
    Age 66
    On April 20, 1978, Salerno was sentenced to six months in federal prison for illegal gambling and tax evasion charges.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1959
    Age 47
    In 1959, Salerno was a secret financial backer of a heavyweight professional boxing title fight at New York's Yankee Stadium between Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson and American boxer Floyd Patterson.
    More Details Hide Details No charges were filed against Salerno. Salerno divided his time between a home in Miami Beach, Florida, a estate and horse farm in upstate Rhinebeck, New York, the Palma Boys Club in East Harlem, and his apartment in the upscale Gramercy Park section of Manhattan. He controlled S&A, a concrete contracting company--one of the two major concrete suppliers in Manhattan. Salerno served as consigliere, underboss, and acting boss of the Genovese family. By the 1960s, Salerno controlled the largest numbers racket operation in New York, grossing up to $50 million per year. Many mobsters moved out of Harlem and East Harlem when they became predominantly Latino and African-American neighborhoods. However, Salerno kept his headquarters at the Palma Boys Social Club in East Harlem and continued to work in these areas. The FBI accused him of heading a bookie and loan shark network that grossed $1 million annually. Salerno hired Roy Cohn as his attorney.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1948
    Age 36
    In 1948, Coppola fled to Florida to escape murder charges, and Salerno took over the crew.
    More Details Hide Details For the next four decades, he was one of the most powerful mobsters in New York. Unlike other mob bosses who were remote and reluctant to talk to outsiders, Salerno was very accessible. Mafiosi from Cleveland, Philadelphia, New England, Buffalo and other cities would visit Salerno to talk about various internal problems they wanted resolved. Salerno preferred a low-key existence and led an unpretentious life. He was never spotted at glitzy mob parties, nightclubs or other popular Mafia bistros. He even sent out Christmas cards with a picture of himself in pajamas on the front cover.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1911
    Born
    Born on August 15, 1911.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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