Antonio Villaraigosa
American politician
Antonio Villaraigosa
Antonio Ramón Villaraigosa is an American politician and the 41st and current Mayor of Los Angeles, California. A member of the Democratic Party; prior to being elected Mayor he was the A member of the California State Assembly, the Democratic leader of the Assembly, the Speaker of the California State Assembly, and a member of the Los Angeles City Council.
Biography
Antonio Villaraigosa's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Antonio Villaraigosa from around the web
John Oliver Exposes Herbalife And Its Dangerous Focus On Latinos
Huffington Post - 4 months
John Oliver wants to warn Latinos about how dangerous multilevel marketing schemes, like Herbalife, can be. On Sunday, the host of “Last Week Tonight” dedicated a 30-minute segment to exposing Herbalife and other multilevel marketing companies who’ve been accused of being pyramid schemes. But Oliver went the extra mile and taped two versions of the piece, one specifically addressing Spanish-speaking Latinos. Oliver first explained how multilevel marketing companies (MLMs) like nutritional supplement company Herbalife are scamming hard working people by promoting a business that promises entrepreneurial independence and wealth despite actual success being hard to achieve. In fact, as Oliver found, it’s only via recruiting other salespeople to create a pyramid network of sales for Herbalife that there is a chance at profit at all.    The host took on Herbalife specifically, which an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission concluded in its chairwoman Edith ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
La Kretz is L.A.'s HP Garage
Huffington Post - 5 months
Look out Mountain View and Cupertino, La Kretz Innovation Campus in the Arts District is closing hard. La Kretz is L.A.'s HP Garage. It is the place where L.A. entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and policymakers are collaborating, promoting and supporting the development of clean technologies and L.A.'s green economy. The Innovation Campus was where I was Friday morning, listening to L.A.'s Storyteller in Chief Mayor Eric Garcetti and others talking optimistically about this unusual collaboration between entrepreneurs, the City, LADWP and the private sector. The Mayor and the other speakers' enthusiasm is infectious and deservedly so. I hope that enthusiasm extends to Measure M for which the Mayor gave a full-throated plug. Measure M is the County transportation initiative on the November ballot. While with any luck the Republican nominee won't be on the ballot come November, Measure M will be, and Los Angeles voters need to support it so that we remain economically vi ...
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Huffington Post article
Former Los Angeles mayor starts anti-Trump campaign
Reuters.com - 9 months
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (Reuters) - Former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said on Wednesday he had formed a political action committee and started raising money to help fight Donald Trump's Republican presidential campaign in key states with large Latino immigrant populations.
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Reuters.com article
This Is Why I Send My Son to Private School
Huffington Post - over 1 year
A version of this post originally appeared at the Los Angeles Times and is reprinted here with permission. Did you see the test scores last month? This is why I send my son to private school. Sure, the scores were said to be lower than the year before -- and yes, this was a baseline year -- but it was something else that triggered that response in me: The achievement gap. It was no surprise, really, that the scores would be lower than last year's. Many officials warned us ahead of time. The head of the Council of Chief State School Officers, a nonprofit group that represents the country's state education leaders, explained to The Times' Howard Blume: "This is going to show the real achievement gap. We are asking more out of our kids, and I think that's a good thing." OK, asking more sounds like a good thing on the surface. But the real question is, will that be carried out across the board? Or could black and brown students be allowed to continue to slip because e ...
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Huffington Post article
This Is Why I Send My Son to Private School
Huffington Post - over 1 year
A version of this post originally appeared at the Los Angeles Times and is reprinted here with permission. Did you see the test scores last month? This is why I send my son to private school. Sure, the scores were said to be lower than the year before -- and yes, this was a baseline year -- but it was something else that triggered that response in me: The achievement gap. It was no surprise, really, that the scores would be lower than last year's. Many officials warned us ahead of time. The head of the Council of Chief State School Officers, a nonprofit group that represents the country's state education leaders, explained to The Times' Howard Blume: "This is going to show the real achievement gap. We are asking more out of our kids, and I think that's a good thing." OK, asking more sounds like a good thing on the surface. But the real question is, will that be carried out across the board? Or could black and brown students be allowed to continue to slip because e ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
This Is Why I Send My Son to Private School
Huffington Post - over 1 year
A version of this post originally appeared at the Los Angeles Times and is reprinted here with permission. Did you see the test scores last month? This is why I send my son to private school. Sure, the scores were said to be lower than the year before -- and yes, this was a baseline year -- but it was something else that triggered that response in me: The achievement gap. It was no surprise, really, that the scores would be lower than last year's. Many officials warned us ahead of time. The head of the Council of Chief State School Officers, a nonprofit group that represents the country's state education leaders, explained to The Times' Howard Blume: "This is going to show the real achievement gap. We are asking more out of our kids, and I think that's a good thing." OK, asking more sounds like a good thing on the surface. But the real question is, will that be carried out across the board? Or could black and brown students be allowed to continue to slip because e ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Homelessness in Los Angeles: Down for the Count?
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
The recent homeless count in Los Angeles revealed that homelessness increased by 16 percent from 2013 to the present; the unsheltered homeless population has nearly tripled. For those of us who have noticed an increasing number of tents propped up along our sidewalks, and too many recreational vehicles parked along our streets, we are not surprised. With so many homelessness initiatives in the past dozen years, should we not be surprised? For the last 20 years, I have led a homeless and housing organization based in Los Angeles called PATH. During this period, I have worked with four Los Angeles city mayors, participated in seven Point-in-Time (PIT) homeless counts, and seen numerous homeless initiatives come and go in the city and the county. In 2003, Los Angeles put together a Blue Ribbon Panel, which I was part of, to create a "ten-year plan to end chronic homelessness." The plan proposed creating 50,000 housing units at a cost of $12 billion. Clearly, our political ...
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Huffington Post article
Villaraigosa: Democrats stuck in past, Clinton in tight race
LATimes - almost 2 years
Former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, a close ally of Hillary Clinton, voiced concern Friday that the Democratic Party was “kind of stuck in last year,” saying he expected the former secretary of state to face “a very close election” for president.
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LATimes article
Antonio Villaraigosa landed a $1.96-million mortgage
LATimes - almost 2 years
Since former L.A. mayor Antonio Villaraigosa bought a house in Hollywood Hills for about $2.5 million, readers have been asking: How can he afford this home?
Article Link:
LATimes article
LA mayoralty has been shaky launching pad for higher office
Yahoo News - about 2 years
LOS ANGELES (AP) — If former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa wants to be California's next U.S. senator, he's going to have to beat the jinx.
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
Antonio Villaraigosa in Washington, mum on possible Senate run
LATimes - about 2 years
Former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is in the nation's capital -- for the second time in less than a month -- glad-handing admirers and talking up education policy. But don't expect him to reveal whether he plans to run for U.S. Senate to replace Barbara Boxer, who is retiring when...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Latino lawmakers say Latino U.S. Senate candidate would energize voters
LATimes - about 2 years
As former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa weighs a U.S. Senate bid, the California Latino Legislative Caucus on Tuesday said a Latino candidate in the mix would attract more Democratic voters to the polls for the election next year.
Article Link:
LATimes article
California Elections: The Fights to Lose to Jerry Brown and Succeed Henry Waxman Come Into More Focus
Huffington Post - about 3 years
In a rather quiet year, some of the more significant races in California are coming into greater focus. Jerry Brown, who still hasn't gotten around to announcing -- that deadline is March 7, Governor -- is a prohibitive favorite to win an unprecedented fourth term as governor of California. But what sort of Republican will be his opponent in the fall? A moderate corporate financier who worships in the Hindu religion and voted for Barack Obama? (Oh, and oversaw the Wall Street bailout, too.) Or a gun-toting Tea Party state legislator who likes to imagine that the budget-cutting Brown is a socialist? And will it matter? My recent trip down memory lane recalling and assessing the times and doings of Congressman Henry Waxman & Co. remind what a rich brew of material exists in California politics, especially when it is relevant to the national scene, as of course all of the Waxman story is. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-bradley/considering-henry-waxman-_b_4732930.htmlIt ...
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Huffington Post article
Villaraigosa endorses lawsuit to reduce teacher job protections
LATimes - about 3 years
Former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Thursday formally endorsed a lawsuit that seeks to overturn job protections for California teachers that are among the most extensive in the nation. 
Article Link:
LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Antonio Villaraigosa
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2016
    Age 63
    In England, he visited London and Manchester, at the invitation of then-Prime Minister Tony Blair, and spoke about Los Angeles' efforts regarding global warming, homeland security and emergency preparedness, and its bid for the 2016 Olympic Games.
    More Details Hide Details Prime Minister Blair had visited Mayor Villaraigosa a couple months prior to that in Los Angeles. In 2006, Villaraigosa led a delegation of over 50 business leaders to China, South Korea, and Japan that secured $300 million in direct foreign investment. In Beijing, Villaraigosa opened a LA Inc. tourism office, in order to ensure a permanent welcome for the millions of Chinese tourists who will visit Los Angeles over the next decade. In Japan, Villaraigosa launched a See My LA advertising campaign in Tokyo-based Family Mart convenience stores throughout Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand.
  • FIFTIES
  • 2013
    Age 60
    He was term limited and could not run for re-election in 2013.
    More Details Hide Details He continues to be actively engaged in education, civic engagement, water, immigration, transportation, and economic development issues. He speaks nationally and throughout California on these issues. Born Antonio Ramón Villar, Jr., in the City Terrace neighborhood of Los Angeles County's Eastside, he attended both Catholic and public schools. His father immigrated to the USA and became a successful businessman, but lost his wealth during the Great Depression. His young wife left him at this time. His father abandoned their family when he was 5 years old, and at age of 16, a benign tumor in his spinal column briefly paralyzed him from the waist down, curtailing his ability to play sports. His grades plummeted at Cathedral High School, and the next year, he was expelled from the Roman Catholic institution after getting into a fight after a football game. He later graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights after taking adult education classes there at night, and with the help of his English teacher, Herman Katz.
  • 2012
    Age 59
    In July 2012, Parker's publicist told the Los Angeles Times that the couple's relationship had ended on May 25, 2012.
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    At the 2012 Democratic National Convention, where Villaraigosa was Chairman, the original 2012 party platform caused controversy after it was written, because the lack of typical invocations and references to God and God-given rights as well as lack of language affirming the role of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
    More Details Hide Details Both of these matters had been included in some previous platforms. On the second day, September 5, former Ohio Governor Ted Strickland introduced an amendment on the floor of the convention to reinsert language invoking God and recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Convention Chairman Villaraigosa put the amendment to a voice vote requiring a two-thirds majority for passage. After the first vote was indecisive, Villaraigosa called for a second vote, which was again met with an equal volume of "ayes" and "nos". A woman standing to his left said, "You've got to rule, and then you've got to let them do what they're gonna do." Villaraigosa called a third vote with the same result. Villaraigosa then declared the amendment passed, causing an eruption of boos on the floor. After his election as Mayor, Villaraigosa was featured on the cover of Newsweek, and in Time 's story on the country's 25 most influential Latinos, but repeated questions concerning his marital infidelity issues appear to have damaged his reputation locally and nationally. His approval rating when he left office was 47%.
  • 2009
    Age 56
    Villaraigosa was featured in the editorial cover story of the June, 2009 Los Angeles Magazine, which took him to task for a lack of effectiveness regarding many of his stated policy priorities, and a focus on election to higher office, to the detriment of the needs of the City.
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    In 2009, a poll by the Los Angeles times showed his approval rating had slipped to 55%, "relatively low for a sitting Mayor who faced little name opposition in his recent re-election victory."
    More Details Hide Details At the same time, his showing and that of the candidates he supported in the election were lackluster.
    On March 6, 2009, Mayor Villaraigosa and Police Chief Bratton announced that the L.A.P.D. had expanded to its largest force in city history.
    More Details Hide Details On May 14, 2009, City Council approved an LAPD/LAFD hiring freeze. In a television advertisement paid for by the Villaraigosa campaign, Chief Bratton stated that "Crime is down to levels of the 1950s." Twenty-four hours before the March 3 Election Day, Villaraigosa and Bratton reannounced a statement from the Mayor’s Office that the “citywide crime-rate drop to the lowest level since 1956, the total number of homicides falling to a 38-year low. Gang homicides were down more than 24 percent in 2008.” However, former Chief of Police Daryl Gates argued against this statistic, citing a trend toward lengthier prison sentences for career criminals as the reason for the change. In fact, crime fell by 43 percent across California between 1994 and 1999. The figures are also disputed by Patrick Range McDonald and Professor Andrew Karmen, John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Karmen stated that, adjusting for population, the Los Angeles murder rate would need to be 180 or less to be equivalent to the crime rate of 1956, with its rate of 104 homicides per 2.2 million people, or one killing for every 22,115 people (the 2007 rate was 396 per 4 million people, or one killing per 10,101 people). McDonald further noted that, "In 1956, 89 percent of homicides were cleared. Today, if you kill another human being in Los Angeles, chances are very good you will get away with it: 43 out of every 100 killers are not caught."
    Villaraigosa was re-elected in 2009, receiving 55.65% of the vote against his most prominent challenger, attorney Walter Moore who won 26.23% of the vote.
    More Details Hide Details Villaraigosa drew controversy by refusing to debate any of his opponents before the election, namely Walter Moore. One of Villaraigosa's main transportation-related goals is to extend the Purple Line subway down Wilshire Boulevard to Santa Monica. Proponents have dubbed the project the "Subway to the Sea." Villaraigosa worked to persuade Congressman Henry Waxman to repeal the ban on subway tunneling in Los Angeles, which occurred in 2006. On November 4, 2008, Los Angeles County voters passed Measure R, an additional half-cent per dollar sales tax that increased the sales tax rate in Los Angeles County from 8.25% to 8.75% and is projected to generate up to $40 billion over thirty years for transportation. Measure R included funding for the portion of the "Subway to the Sea" between Wilshire/Western and Westwood/VA Hospital; a project known as the Westside Subway Extension. Its passage was credited in large part to Villaraigosa, who lobbied the Metropolitan Transportation Agency and County Board of Supervisors to place it on the November ballot, and helped organize the fundraising efforts.
  • 2008
    Age 55
    A November 4, 2008 election day poll, conducted by the Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University found that Villaraigosa had a job approval rating of 61%.
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    Villaraigosa is a member of the Democratic Party, and was a national co-chairman of Hillary Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign, a member of President Barack Obama's Transition Economic Advisory Board, and Chairman of the 2012 Democratic National Convention in September 2012.
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    In February 2008, Villaraigosa welcomed Mexican President Felipe Calderón Hinojosa and members of the Mexican delegation to discuss trade opportunities and witness the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Mexico Business Council for Foreign Trade, Investment and Technology (COMCE) and the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. Villaraigosa traveled to Israel in June 2008 to meet with experts in homeland security, counter-terrorism, and green technology.
    More Details Hide Details He also signed an agreement with the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT - part the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya) on behalf of the LA police department. Under the agreement, the ICT will train US homeland security officials. In recent years, he developed a relationship with the Mayor of the Israeli city of Sderot, Eli Moyal, and met with him during the visit. Villaraigosa has long retained strong ties to the Los Angeles Jewish Community, having spent part of his childhood in the once-Jewish dominated neighborhood of Boyle Heights. In June 2009, Villaraigosa made the cover of Los Angeles Magazine, titled "Failure," with an accompanying article written by Ed Leibowitz, which claimed that Villaraigosa often confused campaigning with governance, wasted 22 weeks in his first term trying to take over the school board, and did little to help education in the City of Los Angeles.
  • 2007
    Age 54
    Villaraigosa acknowledged on July 3, 2007, that he was in a relationship with Salinas.
    More Details Hide Details As a result of the affair, Salinas was suspended by her employer, Telemundo, and against her will was relocated to Riverside, after which she resigned. In a New Yorker profile published shortly before the divorce, Villaraigosa acknowledged that he and Corina had had difficulties over the course of their marriage. "In a twenty-year marriage, there are many ups and downs", Villaraigosa said.
    In the wake of his affair with Spanish-language television reporter, Mirthala Salinas, Villaraigosa announced that he was separating from his wife, and on June 12, 2007, Corina Villaraigosa filed for dissolution of marriage in Los Angeles Superior Court, citing irreconcilable differences.
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    On May 2, 2007, the Los Angeles Times reported that Villaraigosa was under investigation for ethics violations. "The executive director of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission accused Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa of 31 violations of campaign finance and disclosure laws stemming from his 2003 campaign for the City Council."
    More Details Hide Details In June 2010, a formal ethics investigation of Villaraigosa was launched, due to his unreported acceptance of 81 tickets to concerts, awards ceremonies and sporting events. Estimates - including the 13 Lakers courtside tickets valued at $3,100 each and Academy Awards and Governor’s Ball tickets at $21,000 each—suggest that the value of the tickets could amount to tens of thousands of dollars.
  • 2006
    Age 53
    On May 12, 2006, he was awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters by the University of Southern California and was the Class of 2006 commencement speaker. Villaraigosa was one of ten mayors from North America to be short-listed as a finalist for the 2008 World Mayor Award.
    More Details Hide Details In October 2006, Villaraigosa traveled to England and Asia for a sixteen-day trade mission.
    In February 2006, Villaraigosa was presented with the Tom Bradley Legacy Foundation Achievement Award for "following in the footsteps of the first African American Mayor of Los Angeles who served the city for 51 years."
    More Details Hide Details Citing the similarity of the two mayors in building coalitions among diverse communities, the speakers praised Villaraigosa for his vision for the City of Los Angeles. Also in attendance were Mrs. Ethel Bradley, daughter Lorraine and many of Mayor Bradley's former staff members. On May 6, 2006, Villaraigosa was awarded an honorary degree by Loyola Marymount University, and was the Class of 2006 Commencement Speaker.
    Stuckey appealed the firing to the City Council and threatened a lawsuit, and in February 2006, the Los Angeles City Council awarded Stuckey a $50,000 consulting fee with the agreement that there would be no lawsuit. In January 2006, Villaraigosa appointed Ed Boks to the General Manager position. In April 2009, General Manager Ed Boks resigned after complaints from some staff, city councillors, and animal advocates. In June 2010, fifteen months after Boks’ resignation, Brenda Barnette, former CEO of the Seattle Humane Society was appointed.
    More Details Hide Details Villaraigosa has tripled the city's trash collection fee from $11 per month to $36.32 per month for single-family homes, stating: "Every new dollar residents pay for trash pickup will be used to put more officers on the streets," in a press release dated April 12, 2006. A 2008 L.A. City Controller audit by Laura Chick determined that 2008 "only $47 million, or about one-third of the new trash-fee revenue then pouring into city coffers, went to hiring police, and only 366 officers were hired instead of the promised 1,000." Villaraigosa then lobbied to place Proposition S on the ballot to fund new police officers, concerned that a pending court ruling could eliminate the 40-year-old 10% telephone tax. This generated some controversy among tax activists, as Villaraigosa and his negotiating team had recently reached a salary agreement resulting in a 23% pay hike. Controller Laura Chick noted that Proposition S language does not restrict expenditure to police and firefighters, and instead deposits the money into the general fund. It is not certain that any of the Prop S monies were used to hire new police officers. Villaraigosa supports Proposition O, which currently adds $10.22 to the property tax bill of a $350,000 home and will eventually climb to $35.00. Villaraigosa also campaigned last fall for two education bond measures that will increase the size of property tax bills over the next decade.
  • 2005
    Age 52
    On July 1, 2005, Villaraigosa was sworn in as the 41st Mayor of Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details He became the first Latino Mayor of Los Angeles since 1872, when Cristóbal Aguilar (who served from 1866-68 and again from 1870-72) held the office. Attendees to his first inauguration included then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger; former Governors Gray Davis, Pete Wilson, and Jerry Brown; former Vice President Al Gore, U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher, and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
    Villaraigosa placed first in the primary for the Los Angeles mayoral election of March 8, 2005, and won the run-off election on May 17, receiving 58.7% of the vote.
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    In January 2005, Villaraigosa appeared before a coalition of animal rights activists and pledged that, if elected, he would implement a no-kill policy for Animal Services and fire General Manager Guerdon Stuckey, an appointee of former Mayor Hahn.
    More Details Hide Details Animal activists had expressed doubts regarding Stuckey's ability to lead the Department of Animal Service since his appointment, primarily citing his lack of experience. During Stuckey's tenure, activist concern intensified due to a refusal to accept charity-sponsored spay and neuter services, firings of several key animal rights-oriented workers, and excessive euthanasia of animals held by Animal Services. Approximately one year after Villaraigosa's initial promise to fire Stuckey and substantial negative press, Villaraigosa fired Stuckey.
    The biggest issue during the Mayoral election of 2005 was public education.
    More Details Hide Details Because he campaigned and won on the issue of education, Villaraigosa sought the legal authority to do so through AB 1381. AB 1381 was passed by the state legislature and signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. However, the plan received significant opposition among the Los Angeles Board of Education, Board President Marlene Canter and then-superintendent of LAUSD, Roy Romer, among others. On December 21, 2006, AB 1381 was ruled unconstitutional. Villaraigosa challenged LAUSD and sought to take control of the lowest-performing schools managed by the district to transform them into high-performing schools through a non-profit entity called the Mayor's Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, which eventually managed 21 LAUSD campuses and operate under the same labor contract as LAUSD. Though schools in the Partnership are among the lowest performing in the district, they eventually make the largest gains in the state based on California’s Annual Performance Index measure. Were California to continue employing API as a measure of performance, the Partnership would be among the best performing urban districts in the state. In June 2009, teachers at 8 of the ten campuses gave the partnership landslide "no confidence" votes. Steve Lopez, a columnist at the Los Angeles Times, stated that at the two other schools, a significant number of the teachers disapproved of the partnership's operations. Despite no longer serving as mayor of Los Angeles, Villaraigosa continues to serve the Partnership as a 501(c)(3), and continues to raise money in support of its success.
  • FORTIES
  • 2003
    Age 50
    In 2003, Villaraigosa defeated incumbent Councilman Nick Pacheco to win a seat on the Los Angeles City Council representing the 14th District.
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  • 2001
    Age 48
    Villaraigosa ran for election as Mayor of Los Angeles in the 2001 citywide contest but was defeated by Democrat James Hahn in a run-off election.
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    He ran for Mayor in 2001 against Los Angeles City Attorney James Hahn, but lost in the second round of voting.
    More Details Hide Details He ran again in 2005 in a rematch against Hahn and won. During his tenure as Mayor, he gained national attention for his work and was featured in Time's story on the country's 25 most influential Latinos. He was the third Mexican American to have served as Mayor of Los Angeles, and the first in over 130 years.
  • 2000
    Age 47
    He left the Assembly in 2000 because of term limits.
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  • 1998
    Age 45
    In 1998, Villaraigosa was chosen by his colleagues to be the Speaker of the Assembly, the first from Los Angeles in 25 years.
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  • 1994
    Age 41
    Villaraigosa had a relationship with Lu Parker, a local television news anchor and 1994 Miss USA, from March 2009.
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    In 1994, he was elected to the California State Assembly.
    More Details Hide Details Within his first term, he was selected to serve as Democratic Assembly Whip and Assembly Majority Leader.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1990
    Age 37
    In 1990, Villaraigosa was appointed to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Board and served there until 1994.
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  • 1987
    Age 34
    At age 34, as Antonio Villar, he married Corina Raigosa November 28, 1987, and adopted a combination of their last names as his family name.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had two children, Natalia and Antonio Jr.
    He changed his surname to Villaraigosa upon his marriage with Corina Raigosa in 1987.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1977
    Age 24
    Villar went on to attend East Los Angeles College, a community college, and eventually transferred to University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in History in 1977.
    More Details Hide Details At UCLA, he was a leader of MEChA, an organization that seeks to promote Chicano unity and empowerment through political action. At this time, he went by the short form Tony of his given name Antonio. After UCLA, Villar attended the Peoples College of Law (PCL), a school that prioritizes a commitment to progressive social change, but did not pass the bar exam. After law school, he became a field representative/organizer with the United Teachers Los Angeles where he organized teachers and was regarded as a gifted advocate. There, he saw first-hand the issues that teachers experience in the classroom and the importance of ensuring all teachers have the resources they need to be successful in their profession. He later served as president of the Los Angeles chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and the American Federation of Government Employees.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1953
    Age 0
    Born on January 23, 1953.
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