April Glaspie
American diplomat
April Glaspie
April Catherine Glaspie is a former American diplomat, best known for her role in the events leading up to the Persian Gulf War of 1991.
Biography
April Glaspie's personal information overview.
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Barry Lando: Syria-Iraq: On Drawing Lines in the Sand
Huffington Post - over 3 years
There's a certain irony to British Prime Minister David Cameron's decision -- dictated by the British Parliament and public -- not to join President Obama's coalition of the willing. Though the American president may still order an attack on Syria in retaliation for the horrific chemical attack last week, Cameron's surprise move has at least slowed Obama's militant momentum. What's ironic about this situation is that, 23 years ago, it was another British Prime Minister -- Margaret Thatcher -- who played a major role in the disastrous decision of another American President -- George H.W. Bush -- to deploy hundreds of thousands of American troops to the Gulf after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. Common to both those fateful events was the failure of American presidents to establish and maintain a clear policy line. And their ultimate resolve to maintain the image of U.S. power. In August 2012, Barack Obama seemed intent on clearly warning Bashar al-Assad that the ...
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Huffington Post article
Chase Madar: Bradley Manning Has Done More for U.S. Security Than SEAL Team 6
Huffington Post - over 3 years
How Dystopian Secrecy Contributes to Clueless Wars Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com The prosecution of Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks’ source inside the U.S. Army, will be pulling out all the stops when it calls to the stand a member of Navy SEAL Team 6, the unit that assassinated Osama bin Laden.  The SEAL (in partial disguise, as his identity is secret) is expected to tell the military judge that classified documents leaked by Manning to WikiLeaks were found on bin Laden’s laptop.  That will, in turn, be offered as proof not that bin Laden had internet access like two billion other earthlings, but that Manning has “aided the enemy,” a capital offense. Think of it as courtroom cartoon theater: the heroic slayer of the jihadi super-villain testifying against the ultimate bad soldier, a five-foot-two-inch gay man facing 22 charges in military court and accused of the biggest security breach in U.S. history. But let’s be clear on one thing: Manning, the young Army intelli ...
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Huffington Post article
Is Obama Repeating April Glaspie’s Gaffe?
Commentary - almost 5 years
On July 25, 1990, April Glaspie, a career foreign service officer and ambassador to Iraq, made what in hindsight was one of the biggest gaffes in State Department history. During a rare meeting with Saddam Hussein, she assured the Iraqi dictator that the United States would not take sides in the dispute between Iraq and Kuwait. “We have no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait,” she reportedly told the Iraqi dictator. Just over a week later, he invaded his tiny neighbor, setting off a cascade of events which would lead to two wars and devastating sanctions. Fast forward more than two decades. Thirty years after an Argentine military junta for largely populist reasons invaded the Falkland Islands, a British territory populated by British citizens, Argentine President Cristina Kirchner is at it again. Perhaps she wants to deflect attention from her own mismanagement, or perhaps the fact that the British have discovered significant oil reserves of ...
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Commentary article
Bachmann handbill by unknown - OpEdNews
Google News - over 5 years
While Vice President Dan Quayle was being lampooned for his misspelling potato the American public missed the story of our Ambassador April Glaspie, either missing or ignoring Saddam Hussein's warning and inadvertently causing the first Gulf War
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Google News article
Omran: The story is not accurate - Al-Arabiya
Google News - over 5 years
Saddam Hussein says he called the US Ambassador to Iraq, April Glaspie, and told her his anger about what Kuwait is doing in the joint Rumaila oil field. And when she said to him: “This is a matter that has to be dealt between you”, he took it as a
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Google News article
Dennis Kucinich Responds: “I was misquoted” - Commentary
Google News - over 5 years
Former US Ambassador to Iraq April Glaspie, for example, was much too deferential to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in the run-up to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait. While ambassador to Egypt, Frank Ricciardone gave new meaning to sycophancy
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Google News article
PUBLIC VIEWPOINT: Murderers Must Pay Price - NWAOnline (subscription)
Google News - over 5 years
Saddam would probably not have attacked Kuwait in 1990 except for US diplomat April Glaspie's words suggesting that the US would not do anything about his attempt to take over the disputed border region that contained a lot of oil
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Google News article
Cry Havoc - OpEdNews
Google News - almost 6 years
So when the US ambassador to Iraq, April Glaspie, tells Saddam Hussein that in the opinion of the United States how he settles his problems with his neighbors was none of our concern, the US was giving Saddam an open invitation to invade Kuwait
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Google News article
Buying Love - Canada Free Press
Google News - almost 6 years
In 1990, Saddam Hussein assumed a green light to invade Kuwait because President George HW Bush's Ambassador to Iraq, April Glaspie, for quite murky reasons, had the following conversation with Saddam Hussein: “Saddam Hussein - As you know,
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Google News article
من بغداد إلى طرابلس الغرب الثورة والاستعمار-الثورة والاحتلال-الحلقة الاولى - دنيا الوطن
Google News - almost 6 years
لابد من أتطرق في هذا السياق الى ماقالته ابريل غلاسبي"April Glaspie" أخر سفيرة لأمريكا في العراق قبل الحرب (1990-1991م)في بغداد الى المراسلة رندة تقي الدين والذي نشر في جريدة الحياة بتاريخ 15/3/2008 م "الماضي هو الماضي ،فأما ان نتعلم منه واما لا
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Google News article
Letter: Perhaps U.S. should tread 'more softly' abroad - St. Augustine Record
Google News - almost 6 years
Ditto Kuwait after our Ambassador April Glaspie, on the instructions of the George W. Bush administration, told Saddam Hussein that we would not interfere with his territorial dispute. Hussein then attacked Kuwait and once again, we reneged
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Google News article
Les Mensonges des « Apôtres de la Paix » font toujours bonne recette - MediaPart (Blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
Le 25 juillet 1990, l'ambassadrice américaine à Bagdad, April Glaspie, est convoquée par Saddam Hussein qui lui fait part de son intention de conquérir le Koweït. L'ambassadrice ne bronche pas et le dictateur croit comprendre que les États-Unis
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Google News article
BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Surfer Turned Diplomat Takes On Hard-Liners, Leakers and the Push Toward War
NYTimes - almost 13 years
THE POLITICS OF TRUTH Inside the Lies that Led to War and Betrayed My Wife's C.I.A. Identity: A Diplomat's Memoir By Joseph Wilson Illustrated. 513 pages. Carroll & Graf Publishers. $26. The story of former Ambassador Joseph Wilson would seem to have all the plot elements of a Hollywood thriller. ''Ex-hippie-surfer'' dude from California joins the
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NYTimes article
A Last Chance to Stop Iraq
NYTimes - about 14 years
With the Bush administration set to put a resolution on Iraq before the United Nations Security Council next week, those opposed to war will rally around the notion that Saddam Hussein can be deterred from aggression. They will continue to say that the mere presence of United Nations inspectors will prevent him from building nuclear weapons, and
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NYTimes article
Baghdad Frozen in Time By Years of Sanctions
NYTimes - about 18 years
At one newsstand in downtown Baghdad, a magazine on display reports that the Prince of Wales has been seen with Lady Diana Spencer and speculates that a romance might be blossoming. At another the prize offering is a maintenance manual for the 1988 Oldsmobile. Iraq is a nation frozen in time, and the recent wave of American and British bombing
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NYTimes article
Iraq Recognized Kuwait's Borders in '63
NYTimes - over 22 years
To the Editor: A Nov. 11 front-page article says if Iraq carries out its pledge to accept Kuwait's sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence, this will be its first formal recognition of an independent Kuwait. But on Oct. 4, 1963, the prime ministers of Iraq and Kuwait met and signed an agreement wherein "the Republic of Iraq
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NYTimes article
THREATS IN THE GULF: THE BUSH LEGACY Clinton's Line in the Sand; The President Seeks to Avoid Bush's Error Of Not Clearly Warning the Iraqis in 1990
NYTimes - over 22 years
With bellicose threats and a rapid mustering of military might, President Clinton and his advisers are intent on sending Saddam Hussein the clear warning that President Bush did not: that an Iraqi invasion of Kuwait would prompt an overwhelming American response. When Iraqi troops last massed on the Kuwaiti border four years ago, the signals sent
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NYTimes article
THE WORLD; Allow Miscalculation, Open the Way to War
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Again and again in this century, and in others as well, it has been miscalculation that turned crisis into conflict. The German generals were sure in 1914 that they could win a swift and painless victory; had they not been, they might have acted differently. Likewise Hitler a quarter-century later, who was certain that Britain would fail to answer
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NYTimes article
Athenian Games
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Rarely has a state visit threatened to do more damage to American interests than that of the Greek Prime Minister, Andreas Papandreou, which begins today. President Clinton should publicly reproach Greece for its economic embargo against the Republic of Macedonia and get a firm commitment that the Greek leader will stop coddling Serbia. The Greeks
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NYTimes article
Books of The Times; The Limits of Expertise In U.S. Foreign Policy
NYTimes - about 23 years
The Arabists The Romance of an American Elite By Robert D. Kaplan Illustrated. 333 pages. The Free Press/Macmillan. $24.95. "In the late 19th and 20th centuries an Arabist was merely a student of Arabic, like a Hellenist or a Latinist," writes Robert D. Kaplan at the outset of his intriguing new history, "The Arabists: The Romance of an American
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of April Glaspie
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2008
    Age 65
    Glaspie herself for years remained silent on the subject of her actions in Iraq. But in March 2008 she gave an interview to the Lebanese newspaper Dar Al-Hayat.
    More Details Hide Details In the interview, she said she has no regrets. "It is over," Glaspie said. "Nobody wants to take the blame. I am quite happy to take the blame. Perhaps I was not able to make Saddam Hussein believe that we would do what we said we would do, but in all honesty, I don't think anybody in the world could have persuaded him." In the interview, Glaspie recalled that her meeting with Saddam was interrupted when the Iraqi president received a phone call from Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Saddam told her he had assured Mubarak that he would try to settle the dispute, she said. Her cable backs up this version of events; the Iraqi transcript, prepared by Saddam's official English language translator, Sadoun al-Zubaydi, records Saddam saying that Mubarak called before he met with Glaspie.
  • 2004
    Age 61
    Joseph C. Wilson, Glaspie's Deputy Chief of Mission in Baghdad, referred to her meeting with Saddam Hussein in a May 14, 2004 interview on Democracy Now!
    More Details Hide Details : an "Iraqi participant in the meeting said to me very clearly that Saddam did not misunderstand, did not think he was getting a green or yellow light." Wilson's and Akins' views on this question are in line with those of former Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, who stated in a 1996 interview with Frontline that, prior to the invasion of Kuwait, Iraq "had no illusions" about the likelihood of U.S. military intervention. Similarly, in a 2000 Frontline interview, Aziz declared, "There were no mixed signals", and further elaborated: it was a routine meeting.... She didn't say anything extraordinary beyond what any professional diplomat would say without previous instructions from his government. She did not ask for an audience with the president Saddam. She was summoned by the president.... She was not prepared. People in Washington were asleep, so she needed a half-hour to contact anybody in Washington and seek instructions. So, what she said were routine, classical comments on what the president was asking her to convey to President Bush.
  • 2003
    Age 60
    Professors John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt write in the January/February 2003 edition of Foreign Policy that Saddam approached the U.S. to find out how it would react to an invasion into Kuwait.
    More Details Hide Details Along with Glaspie's comment that "'We have no opinion on the Arab–Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait', the U.S. State Department had earlier told Saddam that Washington had 'no special defense or security commitments to Kuwait.' The United States may not have intended to give Iraq a green light, but that is effectively what it did."
  • FIFTIES
  • 2002
    Age 59
    In 2002, the Washington Report on Middle East Affairs published a new account of the Glaspie-Saddam meeting by Andrew Kilgore, a former U.S. ambassador to Qatar.
    More Details Hide Details Kilgore summarized the meeting as follows: At their meeting, the American ambassador explained to Saddam that the United States did not take a stand on Arab-Arab conflicts, such as Iraq’s border disagreement with Kuwait. She made clear, however, that differences should be settled by peaceful means. Glaspie’s concerns were greatly eased when Saddam told her that the forthcoming Iraq-Kuwait meeting in Jeddah was for protocol purposes, to be followed by substantive discussions to be held in Baghdad. In response to the ambassador’s question, Saddam named a date when Kuwaiti Crown Prince Shaikh Sa’ad Abdallah would be arriving in Baghdad for those substantive discussions. (This appears in retrospect to have been Saddam’s real deception.) The points referenced in the second and third paragraphs do not appear in the purported transcripts of the Glaspie-Saddam meeting that were released by Iraq, and on which most of the subsequent criticism of Glaspie is based. If there is a full transcript of the meeting in existence, or if the State Department declassifies Glaspie's cables about the meeting, a different assessment might be reached on her performance.
  • FORTIES
  • 1990
    Age 47
    In September 1990, a pair of British journalists confronted Glaspie with the transcript of her meeting with Saddam Hussein, to which she replied that "Obviously, I didn't think, and nobody else did, that the Iraqis were going to take all of Kuwait."
    More Details Hide Details In April 1991 Glaspie testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. She said that at the July 25 meeting she had "repeatedly warned Iraqi President Saddam Hussein against using force to settle his dispute with Kuwait." She also said that Saddam had lied to her by denying he would invade Kuwait. Asked to explain how Saddam could have interpreted her comments as implying U.S. approval for the invasion of Kuwait, she replied: "We foolishly did not realize he Saddam was stupid." In July 1991 State Department spokesperson Richard Boucher said at a press briefing: We have faith in Ambassador Glaspie's reporting. She sent us cables on her meetings based on notes that were made after the meeting. She also provided five hours or more of testimony in front of the Committee about the series of meetings that she had, including this meeting with Saddam Hussein.
    Journalist Edward Mortimer wrote in the New York Review of Books in November 1990: It seems far more likely that Saddam Hussein went ahead with the invasion because he believed the US would not react with anything more than verbal condemnation.
    More Details Hide Details That was an inference he could well have drawn from his meeting with US Ambassador April Glaspie on July 25, and from statements by State Department officials in Washington at the same time publicly disavowing any US security commitments to Kuwait, but also from the success of both the Reagan and the Bush administrations in heading off attempts by the US Senate to impose sanctions on Iraq for previous breaches of international law.
    In her telegram from July 25, 1990, to the Department of State, Glaspie summarized the meeting as follows:
    More Details Hide Details At least two transcripts of the meeting have been published. The State Department has not confirmed the accuracy of these transcripts, but Glaspie's cable has been released at the Bush Library and placed online by the Margaret Thatcher Foundation. One version of the transcript has Glaspie saying: We can see that you have deployed massive numbers of troops in the south. Normally that would be none of our business, but when this happens in the context of your threats against Kuwait, then it would be reasonable for us to be concerned. For this reason, I have received an instruction to ask you, in the spirit of friendship - not confrontation - regarding your intentions: Why are your troops massed so very close to Kuwait's borders? Later the transcript has Glaspie saying: We have no opinion on your Arab-Arab conflicts, such as your dispute with Kuwait. Secretary Baker has directed me to emphasize the instruction, first given to Iraq in the 1960s, that the Kuwait issue is not associated with America.
    Glaspie had her first meeting with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and his Deputy Prime Minister, Tariq Aziz, on July 25, 1990.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1966
    Age 23
    In 1966 Glaspie entered the United States foreign service, where she became an expert on the Middle East.
    More Details Hide Details After postings in Kuwait, Syria, and Egypt, Glaspie was appointed ambassador to Iraq in 1989. She was the first woman to be appointed an American ambassador to an Arab country. She had a reputation as a respected Arabist, and her instructions were to broaden cultural and commercial contacts with the Iraqi regime. Subsequently, Glaspie was posted to the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in New York City. She was later posted to South Africa as Consul general in Cape Town. She held this post until her retirement in 2002. April Glaspie's first meeting with Saddam Hussein, accompanied by Hussein's translator, Sadoun al-Zubaydi Glaspie's appointment as U.S. ambassador to Iraq followed a period from 1980 to 1988 during which the United States had given covert support to Iraq during its war with Iran.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1942
    Born
    Born on April 26, 1942.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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