Armistead Maupin
American writer
Armistead Maupin
Armistead Jones Maupin, Jr. is an American writer, best known for his Tales of the City series of novels, set in San Francisco.
Biography
Armistead Maupin's personal information overview.
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When their shifts end, Uber drivers set up camp in parking lots
Chicago Times - about 1 month
In the 1970s, the Safeway grocery store in San Francisco's gleaming Marina neighborhood, known as the Social Safeway, was a cornerstone of the pre-Tinder dating scene. Armistead Maupin made it famous in his 1978 book, Tales of the City, calling it "the hottest spot in town" to meet people. For...
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Chicago Times article
Relive Your Favorite 'Looking' Moments With This Brand New Book
Huffington Post - 6 months
The beloved boys of “Looking” may have skipped off into the California sunset for good with a finale film in July, but fans of the HBO series will soon be able to console themselves with a new book. Published by First Third Books and HBO Global Licensing, the Looking book documents the two seasons of the series and the wrap-up film, which focused on the lives and loves of three gay men in San Francisco, in exquisite detail. Included are interviews with the cast and creative team, as well as costume and set design sketches and dozens of full-color, behind-the-scenes photographs.  The Huffington Post got a first look at the book, which will be published in October and is currently available for pre-order in both standard and special editions.  Interestingly, the tome doesn’t shy away from the fact that “Looking” divided audiences during its HBO run, with some viewers arguing that its slice-of-life tone was “too boring.” Despite critical acclaim, the show was canceled after two ...
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Huffington Post article
Andrew Haigh On '45 Years,' The 'Looking' Movie And Depicting Messy Relationships
Huffington Post - about 1 year
The rearview mirror of any relationship can be blinding, particularly one that looks back on more than four decades of shared history. In "45 Years," writer/director Andrew Haigh wonders what might happen if everything a couple has known suddenly crumbles. The movie begins with Jeff (Tom Courtenay) learning that the remains of the woman he once sought to marry have been discovered some 50 years after her death. His reflectiveness sends his wife, Kate (Charlotte Rampling), for a tailspin, and she begins to wonder whether the entire marriage has been tainted by the specter of her husband's lost love. All of this occurs as they are readying a party to celebrate their 45th anniversary.  A soft-spoken story that doesn't make grand statements about its characters, "45 Years" is a nice companion piece to Haigh's previous film, 2011's "Weekend," which followed a young gay couple as unexpected romance blossomed after a one-night stand. The Huffington Post sat down with Haigh a few weeks ag ...
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Huffington Post article
“Tales of the City” author Armistead Maupin: “The Google Bus is the emperor’s carriage”
Salon.com - about 3 years
Few writers have seen their work as wholeheartedly loved as Armistead Maupin. His "Tales of the City" series, the saga of an assortment of unconventional characters searching for love and self-understanding in San Francisco from the late 1970s on, began as a hugely popular local newspaper serial. When the first of nine novels derived from the serial, "Tales of the City," appeared in print, the rest of the world fell for Maupin's vision of the city as the joyous capital of self-expression, too. People (gay and straight) have moved to San Francisco under the influence of the "Tales," and one fan reputedly even asked to be buried with the books. Continue Reading...
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Salon.com article
Armistead Maupin: The Man Who Wrote the Quintessential San Francisco Novel -- On a Newspaper Deadline
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Armistead Maupin's assignment was to show up at the offices of the San Francisco Chronicle every weekday morning and produce seven hundred words, give or take. But unlike most newspaper journalists, Army did not sit down to his Selectric typewriter fortified with a reporter's notebook fat with stats and quotes. That's because Army's job was not to report the story. It was to make it up. A biggish challenge, but Army met it with grace, most days. It was 1976 and Army had been hired by the Chronicle to write fiction in the form of an ongoing serial, "Tales of the City." He had no facts to work from -- only his imagination and what had transpired the night before in his life as a gay man in the fun-loving, free-spirited, dope-smoking, pre-AIDs-epidemic San Francisco of the seventies. Armistead Maupin at Book Passage book store in San Francisco. Photo c 2014 by BF Newhall How do I know? Because I was a copy editor in the People department (what used to be known as the Women's ...
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Huffington Post article
Publishers Weekly Bestsellers: The Week's Hottest Reads
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Copyright 5/8 2013 Publishers Weekly. Week ending 1/26/14, powered by Nielsen Bookscan 5/8 2013 The Nielsen Company. HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "The Invention of Wings" by Sue Monk Kidd (Viking Adult) 2. "First Love" by James Patterson and Emily Raymond (Little, Brown) 3. "The Goldfinch" by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown) 4. "Sycamore Row" by John Grisham (Doubleday) 5. "The First Phone Call from Heaven" by Mitch Albom (Harper) 6. "Command Authority" by Tom Clancy (Putnam Adult) 7. "Cross My Heart" by James Patterson (Little, Brown) 8. "Fear Nothing" by Lisa Gardner (Dutton) 9. "Lost Lake " by Sarah Addison Allen (St. Martin's Press) 10. "Standup Guy" by Stuart Woods (Putnam Adult) 11. "The Days of Anna Madrigal" by Armistead Maupin (Harper) 12. "Under the Wide and Starry Sky" by Nancy Horan (Ballantine) 13. "The Longest Ride" by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing) 14. "The Gods of Guilt" by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown) 15. "Hazardous Duty" by W.E.B. Griff ...
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Huffington Post article
Books of The Times: ‘The Days of Anna Madrigal,’ Concluding ‘Tales of the City’
NYTimes - about 3 years
In “The Days of Anna Madrigal,” Armistead Maupin wraps up the stories of the San Francisco friends he began in 1976.     
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NYTimes article
In Transit Blog: Horizon: Artifacts of the Mayans; ‘Tales of the City’ Finale
NYTimes - about 3 years
In Denver, an exhibition on the Maya civilization; Armistead Maupin touring to promote his latest and last book in the “Tales of the City” series.     
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NYTimes article
In Transit Blog: Horizon: Artifacts of the Mayans; “Tales of the City” Finale
NYTimes - about 3 years
In Denver, an exhibition on the Maya civilization; Armistead Maupin touring to promote his latest and last book in the “Tales of the City” series.     
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NYTimes article
The end of 'Tales,' but a new beginning for Maupin
San Francisco Chronicle - about 3 years
Armistead Maupin parlayed his 1976 "Tales of the City" Chronicle series into books, television miniseries and a musical. Maupin, who is 69 and recently left San Francisco with his husband, Christopher Turner, for Santa Fe, N.M., has brought his landmark "Tales" series to an end with his ninth and final book, "The Days of Anna Madrigal" (HarperCollins), to be published Tuesday. There are coyotes and rabbits in our yard and ravens circling in the valley. Most of the folks are funky Santa Fe types who don't hesitate to wear sweatpants and cowboy boots to the corner market. How does it feel to have finished the "Tales" series? Q: "The Days of Anna Madrigal" tells the story of the 92-year-old Anna planning a trip to Burning Man and a voyage of discovery into her past. [...] I knew that Burning Man was rife with coincidence. Why do you think this series took off and took hold the way it did? The whole thing expanded in the collective imagination and it was everyone's story. [...] I ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
'The Days of Anna Madrigal,' by Armistead Maupin
San Francisco Chronicle - about 3 years
[...] we also know that their creator wouldn't speak so openly of their "days" or their lives "in autumn" if the plan was to keep them around forever. Several characters from early in the series are dead, and we want all our remaining friends to get a long farewell. We'll see the life Anna Madrigal had in the desert brothel her mother owned, the young boy she loved and lost and the second mother who cared for her before she spent a lifetime caring for others. [...] Michael, his husband, Ben, and Brian's grown daughter, Shawna (a writer) are headed out to Burning Man. Jake Greenleaf, Anna Madrigal's faithful caretaker, is planning a Black Rock City salute, in the form of an enormous butterfly art car, to the 92-year-old and her remarkable life. [...] even though there's some doubt among the friends whether Anna Madrigal can withstand Burning Man's harsh conditions, Winnemucca and Black Rock City are about 150 miles apart. Because now it was time to stop reading about a mythic city ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
Conference will examine state's literary identity
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
Historian William Deverell and book critic David Ulin have teamed up with the San Francisco and Los Angeles public library systems and select members of each city's respective literati to organize a two-part conference with the aim of examining California identity and how it relates to an overarching California literary tradition. What we wanted to do was really work with contemporary literary figures and get them in dialogue with one another. The first part of the conference, which will take place Friday and Saturday in San Francisco, features panels and discussions with figures including Will Hearst, chairman of the board of the Hearst Corporation; Phil Bronstein, executive chair of the board of the Center for Investigative Reporting; and a list of luminaries that includes Armistead Maupin, Dana Gioia, Robert Hass, Brenda Hillman, Tobias Wolff, Ellen Ullman and Karen Tei Yamashita. Topics will include the changing state of publishing in California and beyond; discussions on Northe ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
The passing reflections in the side of the piano
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
The show, which started so late because Luna was performing earlier at Davies with the Buena Vista Social Club, was the brainchild of Rick Swig, who'd met Luna long ago in Cuba. The Joe Henderson Lab - a smallish performance space in a corner of the ground floor - was packed, the audience rapt, from Luna's first notes of "My One and Only Love." Jazz fans on hand included baseball great Orlando Cepeda and Pier 23/Sweetie's Art Bar owner/artist Flicka McGurrin (whose "Cold Water Swimmers" paintings, shimmering at night, I hear, are right now in the windows at Bank of America headquarters). Inside, the headlights of passing cars were reflected as moving bars of light in the high-gloss ebony finish on the piano. Each event, says organizer Will Hearst (yes, his family's company makes a weekly deposit in my bank account) includes a series of panels, conversations and talk (see www.writingfromcalifornia.com). The featured session in San Francisco is an Oct. 4, 4:30 p.m. conversation betw ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
Michael Giltz: DVDs: Get Ready For The Doctor! Doctor Who? Exactly.
Huffington Post - over 3 years
A big roundup of some of the best TV sets released in the last few weeks, ranging from classic miniseries and ground-breaking sitcoms to the hottest show on TV. But let's start with the Doctor. DOCTOR WHO: THE DOCTORS REVISITED ($39.99 DVD; BBC) DOCTOR WHO: THE GREEN DEATH ($34.99 DVD; BBC) DOCTOR WHO: SPEARHEAD FROM SPACE ($29.99 BluRay; BBC) THE THICK OF IT ($79.99 DVD; BBC) -- We can stop explaining who the Doctor is, can't we? Now America has finally caught up with the decades-long career of the TARDIS-traveling Time Lord. The budgets are bigger, many of his adventures suspiciously occur on Earth but the Doctor is rightfully celebrated here as the iconic TV figure he's been in the UK for so long. And none too soon: a lot is happening in the world of the Doctor. There's a 50th anniversary special taking place in November with John Hurt portraying some incarnation of the Doctor alongside current lead Matt Smith. Then Smith says goodbye during the Christmas spe ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Armistead Maupin
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 66
    In May 2011, a theatrical musical version of Tales of the City had its premiere at American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco.
    More Details Hide Details The musical has a score and lyrics by Jake Shears and John Garden of the rock band Scissor Sisters, and a book by Jeff Whitty. It was directed by Jason Moore. Maupin has written two novels, Maybe The Moon and The Night Listener, which are not part of the Tales canon, though both books occasionally glance in that direction.
  • 2007
    Age 62
    Maupin is married to Christopher Turner, a website producer and photographer. He saw him on a dating website and then "chased him down Castro Street, saying, 'Didn’t I see you on Daddyhunt.com?'" Maupin and Turner were married in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on February 18, 2007, though Maupin says that they had called each other "husband" for two years prior.
    More Details Hide Details Maupin's former life partner of 12 years, Terry Anderson, was once a gay rights activist (Maupin himself has done much of that sort of work), and co-authored the screenplay for The Night Listener. He lived with Maupin in San Francisco and New Zealand. Ian McKellen is a friend and Christopher Isherwood was a mentor, friend, and influence as a writer. Maupin shares a grandfather with English singer Sarah Jane Morris. He is an atheist. He enjoys doing public readings of his own works and has recorded them all as audiobooks. In 2012 Maupin purchased the home of shoe designers Lynne and Dennis Comeau in Tesuque, New Mexico.
    The book was released on June 12, 2007, declared 'Michael Tolliver Day' by the mayor of San Francisco.
    More Details Hide Details His next project is another Tales volume: "Whatever I have to offer seems to come through those characters... And I see no reason to abandon them." Mary Ann in Autumn was published November 12, 2010 by Harper/HarperCollins, continuing the series. It was reviewed by Joseph Salvatore in the New York Times Sunday Book Reviews on November 14. It was followed in January 2014 by The Days of Anna Madrigal, which Maupin says will be the final novel in the series.
    Prior to the 2007 release of Michael Tolliver Lives, Maupin had been quoted on his website as saying that another Tales of the City novel was unlikely.
    More Details Hide Details Although Maupin originally stated that this novel was "NOT a sequel to Tales the City and it's certainly not Book 7 in the series," he later conceded that "I’ve stopped denying that this is book seven in Tales of the City, as it clearly is... I suppose I didn’t want people to be thrown by the change in the format, as this is a first person novel unlike the third person format of the Tales of the City books and it’s about one character who interrelates with other characters. Having said that, it is still very much a continuation of the saga and I think I realised it was very much time for me to come back to this territory." The novel is written from the first-person perspective of Tales character Michael 'Mouse' Tolliver, now in his fifties and living as an HIV-positive man. It also features appearances by familiar Tales characters, such as Anna Madrigal. Maupin said: "I was interested in pursuing the life of an aging gay man, and Michael was the perfect vehicle... However, as soon as I started writing, I found that, one by one, all the other characters stepped forward and asked to be present. It felt natural, so I went with it." He calls it "a smaller, more personal novel than I've written in the past."
  • THIRTIES
  • 1982
    Age 37
    Maybe The Moon is a story Maupin describes as 'partly autobiographical', despite the main character being a female heterosexual Jewish dwarf. The character was also based on his friend Tamara De Treaux, who played the title character in the 1982 film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.
    More Details Hide Details The Night Listener is a roman à clef, inspired by Maupin's experiences concerning the Anthony Godby Johnson hoax. He says that he wanted to create a psychological thriller, while being able to put autobiographical elements in it. The issues he addresses include the ending of his relationship with his long-term partner and his relationship with his father. The book very lightly references the Tales world via Gabriel Noone's assistant, who is one of DeDe Halcyon-Day's twins from Tales. It was serialized on the internet, on Salon.com, prior to its print publication. The Night Listener was adapted into a movie that was screened at the Sundance Film Festival in late January 2006 and released by Miramax the following August.
  • 1978
    Age 33
    The first of Maupin's novels, entitled Tales of the City, was published in 1978.
    More Details Hide Details Five more followed in the 1980s, ending with the last book, Sure of You, in 1989. A seventh novel published in 2007, Michael Tolliver Lives, continues the story of some of the characters. It was followed by an eighth volume, Mary Ann in Autumn, published in 2010 and a ninth and final volume, The Days of Anna Madrigal, in 2014. In Babycakes, published in 1983, Maupin was one of the first writers to address the subject of AIDS. Of the autobiographical nature of the characters, he says "I’ve always been all of the characters in one way or another." The Tales of the City books have been translated into ten languages, and there are more than six million copies in print. Several of the books have been adapted and broadcast on BBC Radio 4. The first three books in the series have also been adapted into three television miniseries starring Olympia Dukakis and Laura Linney. The first airing was on the American publicly funded television network PBS; subsequent miniseries appeared on the American cable television channel Showtime.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1974
    Age 29
    Tales of the City is a series of novels, the first portions of which were published initially as a newspaper serial starting on August 8, 1974, in a Marin County newspaper, The Pacific Sun, picked up in 1976 by the San Francisco Chronicle, and later reworked into the series of books published by HarperCollins (then Harper and Row).
    More Details Hide Details
    He says he had known he was gay since childhood, but didn't have sex until he was 26 and only decided to come out in 1974 when he was about 30.
    More Details Hide Details The same year, he began what would become the Tales of the City series as a serial in a Marin County-based newspaper, the Pacific Sun, moving to the San Francisco Chronicle after the Sun San Francisco edition folded.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1944
    Born
    Born on May 13, 1944.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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