Art Blakey
American musician
Art Blakey
Biography
View basic information about Art Blakey.
Birthday
11 October 1919
Deceased
16 October 1990
home town
the United States
Death Place
the United States
Career Highlights
Some highlights of Art Blakeys career
Label
Art blakey
Homepage
Http://www.artblakey.com/
Alternative names
Blakey, Arthur; Abdullah Ibn Buhaina
Active years end year
1990z
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Art Blakey
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Art Blakey
News
News abour Art Blakey from around the web
Music: Jazz masters weekend - Taipei Times
Google News - over 5 years
The New Orleans native entered the scene in the early 1980s, and served stints in the bands of jazz masters Art Blakey and Lionel Hampton. Blanchard, 49, has since moved on to become one of the most recognized musicians of his generation,
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'Nica's Dream:' the wild life of jazz patron Pannonica Rothschild - The Seattle Times
Google News - over 5 years
Charlie (Bird) Parker died in her suite at the Stanhope Hotel, and Monk lived in her home in Weehawken, NJ But with one possible exception — the drummer Art Blakey — her relationships were platonic fed by a passion, but a passion for music
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Influences: Trumpet player, bandleader, composer Terence Blanchard - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
By the 1980s, he'd emerged as a brass-wielding force of nature, playing and learning alongside Lionel Hampton, Art Blakey and childhood friend Wynton Marsalis. In the early '90s Blanchard's path as a trumpet player, composer and bandleader spilled into
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Artist's Choice: Randy Brecker on Lee Morgan - JazzTimes Magazine
Google News - over 5 years
A couple of months later, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers were playing at the Academy of Music on Broad Street and I was up in the balcony, amazed at the maturity and virtuosity of this 19-year-old trumpet master. A few short years later when I was
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A life way beyond colorful - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
It is Nica's connections to the jazz world - to sax legend Parker, to the fabled keyboardist and composer Monk, to Art Blakey, to Bud Powell, to a veritable Who's Who of bebop and modern jazz players - that drew Kastin to his subject
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Music Review: Jazz In Brief - Two Dukes, Two Tributes - Seattle Post Intelligencer (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
This is the trio's second album, after 2007's Art Blakey tribute Terms of Art. The album gets off to a nice, relaxed start with "In a Mellow Tone," with Brown's richly resonant bass solo. Turning up the heat on a waltz-time "Do Nothing 'til You Hear
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Cedar Walton “The Bouncer†- Rochester City Newspaper
Google News - over 5 years
Since the late-1950's, Walton has recorded with Art Blakey, Lee Morgan, Joe Henderson, and John Coltrane, not to mention more than 40 albums as a leader. His latest CD's title, "The Bouncer," does not refer to the bruiser who kicks people out of bars;
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Free Concerts, Yonkers to Tarrytown
NYTimes - over 5 years
WHILE the Caramoor and Litchfield festivals fill the first weekend in August with some of the finest jazz a fan can buy, Westchester will be awash in free performances throughout the month as Jazz Forum Arts's 12th annual summer concert series concludes with 16 shows at five locations. The sounds of Brazil will figure high in the programming. Mark
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Critic's pick: best jazz albums for summer - San Jose Mercury News
Google News - over 5 years
The Cookers: "Cast the First Stone" (Plus Loin): Some champion players of the '60s and '70s -- folks who came up with Art Blakey, Max Roach, McCoy Tyner and others -- have found a new home in this all-star unit. We're talking about saxophonists Billy
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Sturdy Pieces of Silver - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Both were founding members of the Jazz Messengers, the band that Mr. Silver originally co-led with drummer Art Blakey, but both left early on, mainly to avoid the drug use that was so prevalent in that quintet. As Mr. Donaldson once told me,
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Bobby Sanabria and Ascension bring Latin jazz to SoundSession 2011 July 9 in ... - Providence Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Sanabria says he believes in the Art Blakey aphorism that “the best ensembles are a combination of youth and experience.” And Latin jazz is an art form that's spread around the world, as the origins of his bandmates suggests: “Music has no color
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Terence Blanchard Quintet, Old Fruitmarket - Herald Scotland
Google News - over 5 years
Like his previous employer, Art Blakey, Blanchard likes to give exposure to young talent and he's shrewd enough to know when a charge's composition will enhance a performance, even at the expense of his own work, and even when said charge has given
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Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers - Ugetsu: Live At Birdland - Jazzwise magazine
Google News - over 5 years
Art Blakey (d), Freddie Hubbard (t), Curtis Fuller (tb), Wayne Shorter (ts), Cedar Walton (p) and Reggie Workman (b). Rec. 16 June 1963 By the middle of 1961, The Jazz Messengers' front line had expanded from two to three sharpshooters with Freddie
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Art Blakey – The Jazz Messengers – Columbia Records/Pure Pleasure Records - Audiophile Audition
Google News - over 5 years
Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers is renowned for the caliber of musicians that participated in the various reincarnations of the band. A protégée of Chick Webb, his skills as a band leader were rooted in his expertise and commitment to ensemble play
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Renowned Jazz Orchestra Swings Into Davies - KTVU San Francisco
Google News - over 5 years
From his New Orleans beginnings and fiery debut with legendary drummer Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers to his string of acclaimed albums and current role as Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, Marsalis has amassed an unrivaled number of awards
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Art Blakey
1919
Blakey was born on October 11, 1919 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to a single mother, who died shortly after his birth.
He is described as having been "raised with his siblings by a family friend who became a surrogate mother"; he "received some piano lessons at school", and was able to spend some further time teaching himself. According to Leslie Gourse's biography, the surrogate mother figure was Annie Peron. The stories related by family and friends, and by Blakey himself, are contradictory as to how long he spent with the Peron family, but it is clear he spent some time with them growing up. Equally clouded by contradiction are stories of Blakey's early music career. It is agreed by several sources that by the time he was in seventh grade, Blakey was playing music full-time and had begun to take on adult responsibilities, playing the piano to earn money and learning to be a band leader. He switched from piano to drums at an uncertain date in the early 1930s. An oft-quoted account of the event states that Blakey was forced at gunpoint to move from piano to drums by a club owner, to allow Erroll Garner to take over on piano. The veracity of this story is called into question in the Gourse biography, as Blakey himself gives other accounts in addition to this one. The style Blakey assumed was "the aggressive swing style of Chick Webb, Sid Catlett and Ray Bauduc".
1939
From 1939-44, Blakey played with fellow Pittsburgh native Mary Lou Williams and toured with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra.
1942
While sources differ on the timing, most agree that he traveled to New York with Williams in 1942 before joining Henderson a year later. (Some accounts have him joining Henderson as early as 1939.) While playing in Henderson's band, Blakey got into a scuffle with Georgia police and suffered injures that got him declared unfit for service in WWII.
He then led his own band at the Tic Toc Club in Boston for a short time.
1944
From 1944-47, Blakey worked with Billy Eckstine's big band.
Through this band, Blakey became associated with the bebop movement, along with his fellow band members Miles Davis, Dexter Gordon, Fats Navarro, Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Sarah Vaughan among others.
1947
After the Eckstine band broke up, Blakey states that he traveled to Africa for a time: "In 1947, after the Eckstine band broke up, we -- took a trip to Africa.
I was supposed to stay there three months and I stayed two years because I wanted to live among the people and find out just how they lived and -- about the drums especially."
Blakey is known to have recorded in 1947, 1948 and 1949.
He studied and converted to Islam during this period, taking the name Abdullah Ibn Buhaina, although he stopped being a practicing Muslim in the 1950s and continued to perform under the name "Art Blakey" throughout his career. As the 1950s began, Blakey was backing musicians such as Davis, Parker, Gillespie, Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk; he is often considered to have been Monk's most empathetic drummer, and he played on both Monk's first recording session as a leader (for Blue Note Records in 1947) and his final one (in London in 1971), as well as many in between. Blakey toured with Buddy DeFranco from 1951 to 1953 in a band that also included Kenny Drew.
On December 17, 1947, Blakey led a group known as "Art Blakey's Messengers" in his first recording session as a leader, for Blue Note Records.
The records were released as 78 rpm records at the time, and two of the songs were released on the "New Sounds" 10" LP compilation (BLP 5010). The octet included Kenny Dorham, Sahib Shihab, Musa Kaleem, and Walter Bishop, Jr.
1949
Around the same time (1947), or 1949 he led a big band called Seventeen Messengers.
The band proved to be financially unstable and broke up soon after. The use of the Messengers tag finally stuck with the group co-led at first by both Blakey and pianist Horace Silver, though the name was not used on the earliest of their recordings.
1954
The "Jazz Messengers" name was first used for this group on a 1954 recording nominally led by Silver, with Blakey, Mobley, Dorham and Doug Watkins – the same quintet recorded The Jazz Messengers at the Cafe Bohemia the following year, still functioning as a collective.
Donald Byrd replaced Dorham, and the group recorded an album called simply The Jazz Messengers for Columbia Records in 1956. Blakey took over the group name when Silver left after the band's first year (taking Mobley and Watkins with him to form a new quintet), and the band name evolved to include Blakey's name, eventually settling upon "Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers". Blakey led the group for the rest of his life. It was the archetypal hard bop group of the 1950s, playing a driving, aggressive extension of bop with pronounced blues roots. Towards the end of the 1950s, the saxophonists Johnny Griffin and Benny Golson were in turn briefly members of the group. Golson, as music director, wrote several jazz standards which began as part of the band book, such as "I Remember Clifford", and "Blues March", and were frequently revived by later editions of the group. "Along Came Betty" and "Are You Real" were other Golson compositions for Blakey.
Blakey went on to record dozens of albums with a constantly changing group of Jazz Messengers. He had a policy of encouraging young musicians: as he remarked on-mic during the live session which resulted in the A Night at Birdland albums in 1954: "I'm gonna stay with the youngsters.
When these get too old I'll get some younger ones. Keeps the mind active." After weathering the fusion era in the 1970s with some difficulty (recordings from this period are less plentiful and include attempts to incorporate instruments like electric piano), Blakey's band was revitalized in the early 1980s with the advent of neotraditionalist jazz. Wynton Marsalis was for a time the band's trumpeter and musical director, and even after Marsalis' departure Blakey's band continued as a proving ground for Johnny O'Neal, Philip Harper, Terence Blanchard, Donald Harrison and Kenny Garrett, among others. He continued performing and touring with the group through the end of the 1980s. Ron Wynn notes that Blakey had "played with such force and fury that he eventually lost much of his hearing, and at the end of his life, often played strictly by instinct." He stubbornly refused to wear a hearing aid, arguing that it threw his timing off, so most of the time he played by sensing vibrations. Javon Jackson, who played in Blakey's final lineup, claimed that he exaggerated the extent of his hearing loss. "In my opinion, his deafness was a little exaggerated, and it was exaggerated by him. He didn't hear well out of one ear, but he could hear just fine out the other one. He could hear you just fine when you played something badly and he was quick to say 'Hey, you missed that there.'
1973
Blakey was a heavy smoker; he appears in a cloud of smoke on the Buhaina's Delight (1961) album cover, and in extended footage of a 1973 appearance with Ginger Baker, Blakey begins a long drummers' "duel" with cigarette alight.
Blakey had been living in Manhattan when he died of lung cancer, aged 71, at St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center. His New York Times obituary notes that he was survived by four daughters (Gwendolyn, Evelyn, Jackie, and Sakeena), and by four sons (Takashi, Kenji, Gamal, and Akira).
1990
Blakey's final performances were in July 1990.
He died on October 16 of lung cancer. Blakey assumed an aggressive swing style of contemporaries Chick Webb, Sid Catlett and Ray Bauduc early in his career, and is known, alongside Kenny Clarke and Max Roach as one of the inventors of the modern bebop style of drumming. Max Roach described him thus: His drumming form made continuing use of the traditional grip, though in later appearances he is also seen using a matched grip. As the supporting materials for Ken Burns's series Jazz notes, "Blakey is a major figure in modern jazz and an important stylist in drums. From his earliest recording sessions with Eckstine, and particularly in his historic sessions with Monk in 1947, he exudes power and originality, creating a dark cymbal sound punctuated by frequent loud snare and bass drum accents in triplets or cross-rhythms." This source continues:
Died on October 16, 1990.
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