Ashraf Marwan
Egyptian businessman
Ashraf Marwan
Ashraf Marwan was an Egyptian billionaire and alleged spy for Israel, or possibly an Egyptian double agent. Marwan was married to Mona Gamal Abdel Nasser, daughter of former Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser.
Biography
Ashraf Marwan's personal information overview.
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News
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40 Years Later: A Look Back at the Yom Kippur War
Huffington Post - over 3 years
It should not have come as a surprise to Israel. Not after Egyptian President Anwar el Sadat threatened war repeatedly, not after Egypt and Syria assembled massive military forces on the frontiers, not after Jordan's King Hussein flew secretly to Israel to warn Prime Minister Golda Meir that an attack was imminent. But it did. And when full-scale war erupted at 2 p.m. on October 6, 1973, Israel was rocked back on its heels. In the first three days, Egypt re-crossed the Suez Canal and retook portions of the western Sinai; Syria rolled across the Golan Heights and shelled Israel's northern settlements. Israel hurriedly mobilized, fought back, regained lost territory, pushed forward to occupy more Arab land and finally, reluctantly, accepted a ceasefire on October 25. When the shooting stopped, Israel's forces stood in place, 25 miles from Damascus, 63 miles from Cairo. The war came as a surprise because of skillful deception on the Arab side, but mainly because of hubris ...
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Huffington Post article
Gunmen kill Pakistani Taliban commander linked to deadly attack
Yahoo News - over 4 years
PESHAWAR, Pakistan (Reuters) - Gunmen shot dead a Pakistan Taliban commander linked to an attack on a volleyball tournament in northwest Pakistan in 2010 that killed almost 100 people, officials said on Wednesday. Maulana Ashraf Marwat was killed in Pakistan's Shaktoi area of South Waziristan near the Afghan border on Tuesday, said mourners at his funeral. The identity of the gunmen was unclear. ...
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Yahoo News article
Souad Hosni's Murderers Killed Jamal Abdel Naser's Son-in-Law - Wikeez
Google News - over 5 years
The same team that killed Souad Hosni, also killed Ashraf Marwan, the son-in-law of the late Egyptian president Jamal Abdel Naser. For the past 8 months, the Scotland Yard police had been running investigations to pin-point the similarities between the
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Google News article
Hotel Son Vida: Die Burg der Berühmten - Mallorca Zeitung
Google News - over 5 years
In den 80er Jahren wurde es von Ashraf Marwan erworben, dem Schwiegersohn des ehemaligen ägyptischen Präsidenten Nasser, und 1991 von der katalanischen Unternehmerfamilie Gaspart. Seit 1995 gehören die Fünf-Sterne-Burg sowie der Golfplatz der deutschen
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Google News article
Maradona lĩnh lương ở Trung Đông - 24 giờ
Google News - almost 6 years
Cuối tuần vừa qua, huyền thoại bóng đá Argentina đã có những cuộc đàm phán với giám đốc điều hành Ahmad Ashraf Marwan Mohammed và chủ tịch Bin Bayat của đội bóng Trung Đông. Và không ngạc nhiên khi những điều khoản đi đến thống nhất giữa BLĐ Al Wasl và
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Google News article
A Hidden Alley in the Arab-Israeli Maze
NYTimes - over 9 years
To the Editor: Re ''Who Killed Ashraf Marwan?,'' by Howard Blum (Op-Ed, July 13): In a forthcoming study, we present new evidence confirming the assumption that Ashraf Marwan was deployed by the Egyptian authorities to convey disinformation, to Britain as well as to Israel. Our study includes a cable from a British military attaché in Cairo dated
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NYTimes article
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Who Killed Ashraf Marwan?
NYTimes - over 9 years
THE billionaire's body tumbled over the railing of his apartment's fourth-floor balcony and landed hard on the London sidewalk. And like so much in the complicated life of Ashraf Marwan -- a 62-year-old Egyptian who had been the most effective spy in the history of the Middle East -- the mysterious circumstances of his death two weeks ago provoked
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NYTimes article
WORLD BRIEFING | MIDDLE EAST; Egypt: Man Said To Be Mossad Spy Found Dead
NYTimes - over 9 years
Ashraf Marwan, a son-in-law of former President Gamal Abdel Nasser who has been named by Israeli officials as a source for the Israeli intelligence service Mossad, died in London where he had been living. The Egyptian state news agency reported that he had fallen from his balcony. Israeli news media have said that on the eve of the Yom Kippur war
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NYTimes article
COMPANY NEWS; Another Bid For Storehouse
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: A small British engineering concern, Benlox Holdings P.L.C., has started a $3.35 billion bid for Storehouse P.L.C., a huge British retailing group that owns the Conran household-goods chain. A small British engineering concern, Benlox Holdings P.L.C., has started a $3.35 billion bid for Storehouse P.L.C., a huge British retailing group that
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NYTimes article
MEMOIRS BY SADAT FRIEND TIE FORMER OFFICIAL TO FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT
NYTimes - almost 36 years
Publication of the autobiography of President Sadat's closest friend has created an uproar here because it contains allegations of financial misconduct by a former Prime Minister and by two daughters of Gamal Abdel Nasser. The book, ''Pages From My Experience,'' is by Osman Ahmed Osman, a self-made millionaire contractor whose company built the
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ashraf Marwan
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2007
    Age 63
    Marwan died on 27 June 2007 outside his flat in Carlton House Terrace, London.
    More Details Hide Details The cause of death was traumatic aortic rupture following a fall from the balcony of his fifth-floor apartment. News reports indicate that the Metropolitan Police Service increasingly believe Marwan was murdered, a belief also held by Marwan's eldest son, Gamal. Marwan's funeral in Egypt was led by Egypt's highest-ranked religious leader, Muhammad Sayyid Tantawy, and attended by, amongst others, Gamal Mubarak, son of the former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, and intelligence chief Omar Suleiman. According to President Mubarak, "Marwan carried out patriotic acts which it is not yet time to reveal." Following a case review in January 2008, the investigation was transferred to the Specialist Crime Directorate, both because of its public nature and because the shoes Marwan was wearing when he fell, key evidence in the case, had been lost. One witness, who was on the third floor of a nearby building, told police that he saw two men "wearing suits and of Mediterranean appearance" appear on the balcony moments after Marwan's fall, look down, and then return inside the apartment. Police are also reported to have lost Marwan's shoes, which could hold clues on whether or not Marwan jumped from the balcony.
  • FIFTIES
  • 2002
    Age 58
    His identity as a spy for Israel was revealed in December 2002, by the London-based Israeli historian Ahron Bregman, who claimed that Marwan was a double-spy who deceived the Israelis.
    More Details Hide Details Bregman’s source was Maj. Gen. (ret.) Eli Zeira, the director of Israel’s Military Intelligence in the 1973 War and the main culprit in the intelligence fiasco prior to the war. Marwan married Mona Abdel Nasser in the 1960s. One of Marwan's sons was married to the daughter of former Arab League Secretary General Amr Moussa. His other son, Gamal, is the owner of the television group "Melody" and a close friend of Jimmy Mubarak, the son and apparent heir of President Husni Mubarak.
  • 1998
    Age 54
    Marwan continued working for the Mossad until 1998 and was handled throughout this period by his single case officer, Dubi.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1981
    Age 37
    Following Sadat’s assassination in October 1981, Marwan left Egypt and started a business career in London.
    More Details Hide Details He gained a reputation as a mysterious man who does not play according to the rules of the City. Among others he was involved in the failed attempt by Tiny Rowland to take over the House of Fraser – a group of department stores, whose jewel in the crown was Harrods, where the English aristocracy used to shop. Marwan became wealthy though the extent of his wealth had never become clear. In December 1970, Marwan started working for the Mossad. Egypt had begun preparing a war with the aim of retaking the Sinai Peninsula that it had lost to the Israelis in the 1967 Six Day War. Marwan’s unparalleled access to his nation’s best-kept secrets, especially after his promotion in May 1971, allowed him to provide Israel with information about the coming war—including the full Egyptian war plans, detailed accounts of military exercises, original documentation of Egypt’s arm deals with the Soviet Union and other countries, the Egyptian military Order of Battle, the minutes from meetings of the high command, accounts of Sadat’s private conversations with other Arab leaders, and even the protocols of secret summit meetings in Moscow between Sadat and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. As a senior Israeli intelligence officer had said, by providing these documents Marwan turned his country, Israel’s main enemy, into an open book.
  • 1976
    Age 32
    By this stage, however, he accumulated a considerable number of personal enemies, who accused him of using his position near Sadat to gain personal wealth. When these accusations gained momentum, Sadat had to yield to the pressure and in March 1976 he ended Marwan’s service in the Presidential Office.
    More Details Hide Details Marwan was nominated to head the Arab Organization for Industrialization, an arms production complex in Cairo that was financed by Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Qatar. Following additional political pressures, Sadat had to relieve him from this position in October 1978.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1974
    Age 30
    On 14 February 1974 he became Secretary to the President of the Republic for Foreign Relations, a new position that reflected Sadat’s ruling style.
    More Details Hide Details Given Sadat’s dissatisfaction with the conduct of his Foreign Minister, Ismail Fahmy, Marwan was considered as a candidate to replace him.
  • 1973
    Age 29
    After the 1973 War Marwan continued his way to the top.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1971
    Age 27
    In May 1971 Marwan played an important role in defeating an alleged coup attempt by Nasser’s loyalists, including Sami Sharaf, against Sadat’s rule.
    More Details Hide Details Following these events, known as the "Corrective Revolution," Sharaf was arrested and Sadat nominated Marwan to replace him. Despite his official title, Marwan was actually Sadat’s personal emissary, in charge of relations with Saudi Arabia and Libya. In his new capacity, Marwan developed excellent relations with the Saudi and the Libyan leaderships. In Saudi Arabia he worked hand in hand with Kamal Adham, King Feisal’s brother-in-law, who established and supervised the Saudi security service. In Libya he was close to Muammar Gaddafi, and his counterpart for many missions was the Libyan Prime Minister, Abdessalam Jalloud. Both Saudi Arabia and Libya provided Egypt with critical financial and military assistance before the Yom Kippur War. Libya delivered to Egypt Mirage-5 aircraft that were considered critical for the coming war and which, under the French embargo, could not be sold directly to Egypt. Marwan managed this Libyan-Egyptian deal as well as other highly sensitive issues.
  • 1970
    Age 26
    Following Nasser’s death in September 1970, Marwan became a close aide to President Sadat, who needed him by his side in order to demonstrate that he had the support of Nasser’s family.
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  • 1968
    Age 24
    In late 1968 Marwan, Mona, and their new-born son, Gamal, left for London, allegedly for the continuation of Marwan’s studies.
    More Details Hide Details A few months later the young couple was ordered by Nasser, who was irritated by information concerning their lavish lifestyle, to return to Egypt, where Marwan continued working under Sammy Sharaf. Marwan’s service at the Presidential Office lasted eight years (1968-1976). Although, under Nasser, he held only a junior position, the president used him sometimes for delicate missions such as calming the crisis that erupted following General Saad al Shazly’s resignation from the army when his rival was nominated as chief of staff.
    In 1968 Marwan started working in the Presidential Office under Sami Sharaf, Nasser’s aide-de-camp and the strong man of the Egyptian security service, who kept an eye on him.
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  • 1966
    Age 22
    Nevertheless, under her pressure, he agreed to the marriage, which took place in July 1966.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1965
    Age 21
    In 1965, at the age of 21, Marwan graduated Cairo University with a degree in chemical engineering and was conscripted into the army.
    More Details Hide Details At the same year he met Mona Nasser, the president’s second daughter, who was 17 at the time. She fell in love with him, but her father suspected that Marwan’s interest in his daughter stemmed more from her political status than her personal charms.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1944
    Age 0
    Marwan was born in Egypt on 2 February 1944 to a respected family.
    More Details Hide Details His grandfather was the chief of the Sharia courts in Egypt, and his father, a military officer, reached the rank of General in the Egyptian Republican Guard.
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