Audrey Niffenegger
American writer
Audrey Niffenegger
Audrey Niffenegger is an American writer, artist and academic.
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The Better Half: 8 Tales of Powerful Wives
Huffington Post - 7 months
By Erica Nelson | Off the Shelf As the saying goes, "Behind every man, there's a great woman." With this list, we're paying homage to the stories of the wives of real-life famous men, wives of fictional men, and wives who are famous in their own right. These books tell the stories of women who are strong, resilient, and determined to carve out their own space in the world.   The Wife by Meg Wolitzer Joseph is one of America's preeminent novelists, and his wife, Joan, has spent forty years subjugating her own literary talents to fan the flames of his career. But Joan has finally decided to stop. This gripping novel flashes back to follow the course of the marriage that brought the couple to this breaking point.   The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger Henry is a dashing, adventurous librarian who inadvertently travels through time and falls in love with Clare, an artist whose life takes a natural sequential course. Their passionate affair captures them i ...
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Huffington Post article
Audrey Niffenegger tells scary stories at Chicago Humanities Festival
Chicago Times - over 1 year
"Houses, lovers, children, cats: things that are frequently haunted." Audrey Niffenegger provides this inventory of the supernatural in her introduction to "Ghostly," a new anthology of 16 ghost stories spanning 170 years selected and illustrated by the author of "The Time Traveler's Wife." On...
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Chicago Times article
WATCH: Tech Takes Reading For A Ride
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Can it be true? Those shiny, blinking devices that seem to be multiplying around us are actually encouraging us to read more? Apparently so! But tablets and e-readers are just a part of how technology and the Internet are transforming the world of reading. Billions in e-book sales suggest publishing has a chance to adapt and survive in step with the times, as opposed to industries like music and movies, still struggling to catch up to consumers. The Internet and e-books may even be helping breathe new life into short stories. So is it a paper versus digital fight to the death? Hardly. "It's ridiculous that there even are sides," says Audrey Niffenegger, author of The Time Traveler's Wife. "There should be the book community looking at all the things available to it and making choices about what each person wants." And where are libraries in all this? Front and center. From e-books and WiFi to computer classes, digital is inspiring transformation in the places formerly known as ...
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Huffington Post article
Dave Astor: The Art of Putting Artists in Literature
Huffington Post - over 3 years
If a picture is worth a thousand words, how worthy are thousands of words about literary characters who draw pictures? Yes, some fiction includes protagonists who are painters, cartoonists or other kinds of artists. It's a tricky proposition for authors, because the works artist characters create can only be described, not seen (unless the book is illustrated, or a graphic novel). But there are advantages to having artists in literary roles. Those characters are of course creative, and they can also be quirky, bohemian, groundbreaking, pretentious, frustrated, low on money, etc. -- traits and situations that all have strong dramatic potential. The idea for this post occurred to me while I recently read Don DeLillo's Underworld, an ambitious novel (about the second half of the 20th century) whose large cast of characters includes artist Klara Sax. Parenthood and other things make it hard for Klara to reach her full artistic potential until she becomes famous in her 70s ...
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Huffington Post article
Audrey Niffenegger's Dream World
Huffington Post - over 3 years
"The compulsion when I'm writing has often been: 'Let's kill them all!' writes Audrey Niffenegger, author of "The Time Traveler's Wife," in a piece for the Guardian. "I can make my characters' lives really quite miserable. I don't feel a duty to give hope or do the right thing, only to get inside the person's head and try to understand how horrendous some things might feel." Niffenegger's tendency to tap into the psychology of her seemingly troubled subjects -- most often women -- shows up on her canvases as well, particularly in her first major museum show, a retrospective at The National Museum of Women in the Arts this month. In the exhibit, Niffenegger displays 239 paintings, none of which depict classical smiling beauties. Instead, her complicated subjects wear ambivelant expressions, shrinking away from the viewer while powerfully meeting their gaze at the same time. "Her heroines are occasionally doomed, they misbehave, but they are always daring, passionate and ...
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Huffington Post article
Foz Meadows: Romance Cooties: Women and Science Fiction
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When I was five or six, the must-have toys of the minute for girls were the Cupcake Dolls -- a range of little plastic princesses with chunky hats whose legless torsos melted seamlessly into their voluminous rubber skirts. The big twist, as the name suggests, was that the dolls converted into toy cupcakes: their hats were designed in the shape of icing, and their upflipped skirts resembled cupcake wrappers. They were pink and pastel and saccharine, and they were also scented: each doll exuded a different sickly perfume, which lead to the rather bizarre practise of sticking your nose up their dresses and sniffing. The girls in my class all had some, and once we discovered how much the boys hated them, we took to chasing them around the playground at lunchtime, trying to shove the perfumed dollbits in their faces while they shrieked and moaned about girl germs. That's the image I think of now, whenever I hear male literary figures bemoaning the evils of romance, or otherwise ...
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Huffington Post article
The Best Books For Valentine's Day
Huffington Post - about 4 years
The staff at any given book publisher read a lot of books, and Random House Canada is no exception. While the subjects enjoyed can range from the apocalypse to fiction to memoirs, and yes, even erotica, every book tends to involve some sort of romantic element. In honour of Valentine's Day, the online marketing team at Random House decided to classify their favourite love stories, spanning the office and getting everyone to share the romances that had them all hot and bothered. Check out the gallery below to see who recommended what — and find out if that book might be one you want to pick up this Valentine’s Day! Feel free to add your own favourite to the list, or in the comments below. The book: Above All Things by Tanis Rideout It might be the fictional version of George and Ruth Mallory, but it sure felt pretty real to Shona, one of Random House's publicists. She recommended you pick up Tanis Rideout's Above All Things. The precis: The Paris Wife meets Into T ...
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Huffington Post article
Dave Astor: Music in Literature
Huffington Post - about 4 years
People who love both fiction and music might waffle Hamlet-like about whether to enjoy a book or some tunes in their free time. But there's a way to combine both! I don't mean reading and listening to music at the same time, though you can do that if you don't pay full attention to either. I mean reading fiction containing some musical elements. Music is so much a part of our lives that its presence in literature can help readers relate to fictional situations and characters. Also, characters who love music are often creative people (as is the case with real-life music lovers), and creative people tend to be quite interesting. In addition, music can give us insights into what makes protagonists tick: What do they listen to? Do they also sing, write tunes and/or play an instrument? Does music set off Casablanca-like memories in the minds of fictional characters (as music can do in the minds of real-life readers)? Music's jogging of memory is quite profound in James ...
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Huffington Post article
Annette Bourdeau: Why 'On the Road' And Other Book-To-Movie Adaptations Fall Flat
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Sometimes, books just don't translate well onto the big screen. Want proof? Look no further than this week's release, "On the Road." While you've got to give director Walter Salles ("The Motorcycle Diaries") credit for tackling such an ambitious project, his adaptation of Jack Kerouac's beloved classic just doesn't work. It's way too long, for one, clocking in over two hours. But more importantly, it doesn't capture the essence of being on the road. Granted, that's a difficult thing to encapsulate on the big screen. It's certainly not easy to depict the moments of self-discovery that occur while gazing out of a car window deciding what to do with your life. That said, it seems as though the flick doesn't even try. Most of the travelling scenes are completely glossed over. Instead, we just see the characters jump from New York to San Francisco to Virginia and back again. Naturally, there's a lot more to the book that just being on the road. The movie does try to capt ...
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Huffington Post article
Dave Astor: The Appeal of Fiction Juxtaposition
Huffington Post - over 4 years
One great thing about reading novels is that they give vicarious variety to our lives. Most of us have a certain routine, so it's exciting to pick up a book and end up in another time, place, and situation. To make this experience even more intense, I often try to follow a novel I just read with one that's very different. "The joy of juxtaposition"? I guess that's one silly, alliterative way to put it. For instance, I recently followed Henry James' Daisy Miller with Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games. Could any two novels be more different? Well, maybe Confessions of a Shopaholic and Ulysses... Anyway, it was interesting to read, within a week, two books that seemingly had little in common. Daisy Miller (1878) is a well-crafted novel of manners without much of a plot, but with plenty of character insight and societal observation. Daisy is the charming daughter in an affluent American family visiting Europe, where she acts a bit too "forward" for a woman of her station ...
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Huffington Post article
LAURA CARTLEDGE Life’s Like That...Love of reading is a gift I’ll share to celebrate World Book Night
Bognor Regis Observer - almost 5 years
I have been a bookworm for as long as I can remember – which means my shelves tell a story in themselves. You can track my childhood through Enid Blyton’s adventures, to the wizarding world of Harry Potter – which I will admit took me into my adult years, too. Then of course there are the pages that are yet to be turned at all. Like Nelson Mandela’s A Long Walk to Freedom – a book so fat it might have to wait until I retire. It is fair to say books definitely play a big part in my life – which is why I am so excited for Monday. April 23 is already an important day for literature as it is Shakespeare’s birth day and death day, but this year it has also been chosen as the date for World Book Night. The event sees 20,000 people across the country each give away 24 copies of a book they love. And this year – I will be one of them. My book is the Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffeneger. The title may sound like it is a tedious attempt at reinventing the rom-com, but ‘you shouldn ...
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Bognor Regis Observer article
Add a personal message:(80 character limit) - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
13. Alison Callahan, Morgenstern's editor at Doubleday, said it's usually difficult to find authors who so love an about-to-be-published novel by an unknown author that they will write a blurb for it. Yet rave reviews rolled in from Audrey Niffenegger,
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Google News article
Burnsville's for book lovers this week - Charlotte Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Friday's agenda includes readings, sessions, book signings and workshops followed by a talk at 7 pm by Audrey Niffenegger, best-selling author of "The Time Traveler's Wife." Saturday is a full day of readings, sessions, book signings and workshops,
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Google News article
Summer readings: The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. by Audrey Niffenegger It was August 2007, the year I finished my English degree. I remember feeling deliciously liberated, delving into a book that didn't appear on a reading list or require Spark notes
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Google News article
ED2011 Book Review: Neil Gaiman with Audrey Niffenegger: Writing Without ... - ThreeWeeks News
Google News - over 5 years
Audrey Niffenegger's questions guided him through a range of subjects before he regaled the audience with his experience of writing, and realising, an episode of Doctor Who. Those who'd hoped to hear from Niffenegger were somewhat disappointed,
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Google News article
ED2011 Book Review: Audrey Niffenegger: A Magical Catalogue Of One Person And ... - ThreeWeeks News
Google News - over 5 years
A writer known for pushing fantastical literature into the mainstream, Audrey Niffenegger charmed a packed-out main theatre audience. The event started with a reading from her second novel, 'Her Fearful Symmetry' followed by a discussion of her work
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Google News article
Audrey Niffenegger: 'Fantasy and magic are loaded words' - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Audrey Niffenegger, author of The Time Traveler's Wife, is guest programmer at this year's Edinburgh international books festival
Article Link:
Google News article
Edinburgh International Book Festival: Audrey Niffenegger | Jennifer Egan ... - Edinburgh Festivals
Google News - over 5 years
On the stage of the Main Tent, Audrey Niffenegger, one of the festival's guest selectors, was reading a story about a ghost making herself comfortable in the narrow confines of a desk drawer of a flat overlooking Highgate cemetery. This is, of course,
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Audrey Niffenegger
    FORTIES
  • 2009
    Age 45
    A film version of Niffenegger's debut novel, The Time Traveler's Wife (2003), starring Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams, was released in August 2009.
    More Details Hide Details She has also written a graphic novel, or "novel in pictures" as Niffenegger calls it, called The Three Incestuous Sisters. This book tells the story of three unusual sisters who live in a seaside house. The book has been compared to the work of Edward Gorey. Another graphic novel, The Adventuress, was released on September 1, 2006. The 2004 short story 'The Night Bookmobile' is currently being serialised in 'Visual Novel' format in The Guardian.
    The book was released on 1 October 2009 and is set in London's Highgate Cemetery where, during research for the book, Niffenegger acted as a tour guide.
    More Details Hide Details She is currently working on a third novel called The Chinchilla Girl in Exile, about a girl called Lizzie Varo, who suffers from hypertrichosis (excessive body hair). She is also a professor in the Interdisciplinary Book Arts MFA Program at the Columbia College Chicago Center for Book and Paper Arts. She is the founding member of T3 or Text 3, an artist and writer's group that also performs and exhibits in Chicago. Niffenegger is also a Faculty member at the North Shore Art League where she teaches the Intermediate & Advanced Printmaking Seminar. Niffenegger is an alumna of the Ragdale Foundation, where she is also a board member. She described herself as "somewhere in the spectrum of agnosticism and atheism" and ascribed her disbelief to her Catholic background.
    In March 2009, Niffenegger sold her second novel, Her Fearful Symmetry, for an advance of $5 million to Charles Scribner's Sons, a unit of Simon & Schuster, after a fiercely contested auction.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1963
    Born
    Born on June 13, 1963.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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