Augusta Leigh
Daughter of Lord Byron
Augusta Leigh
Augusta Maria Byron, later Augusta Maria Leigh, styled "The Honourable" from birth, was the only daughter of John "Mad Jack" Byron, the poet Lord Byron's father, by his first wife, Amelia Osborne (Baroness Conyers in her own right and the divorced wife of Francis, Marquis of Carmarthen, who was later to become 5th Duke of Leeds).
Biography
Augusta Leigh's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Augusta Leigh
News
News abour Augusta Leigh from around the web
Oh Lord! What a scoundrel - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
But it's the fully consummated incestuous relationship with Augusta Leigh that still has the power to shock. "It wasn't really that kinky, was it? He didn't know Augusta all that well as a kid; she was a half-sister," argues Markovits,
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To Sext, or Not to Sext - American Thinker
Google News - over 5 years
Whether or not Byron was proud of his numerous indiscretions, including a possible dalliance with his half-sister, Augusta Leigh, I cannot say. But his actions fit right into the liberal template of unlimited personal freedom
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What's On Today
NYTimes - about 7 years
8 P.M. (Sundance) MAN ON WIRE (2008) As a young man, the aerialist Philippe Petit, above, was flipping through a magazine in a doctor's office when he saw an article about plans to build the two tallest skyscrapers in the world side by side in Lower Manhattan -- and he became obsessed with walking between them. This documentary from James Marsh
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Oh, Lord
NYTimes - over 7 years
BYRON IN LOVE A Short Daring Life By Edna O'Brien 228 pp. W. W. Norton & Company. $24.95 Thank the gods of literature that George Gordon, Lord Byron, was born in 1788, well out of the reach of psychopharmacology. ''Byron in Love,'' the Irish novelist Edna O'Brien's compact and mischievously complicit biography of the great Romantic poet and enfant
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WHAT'S ON TONIGHT
NYTimes - over 11 years
9 P.M. (BBC America) BYRON -- Jonny Lee Miller (above) plays Lord Byron, the devastatingly handsome 19th-century poet who was idolized like a rock star. Vanessa Redgrave plays his wise older-woman confidante. (''We're not in ancient Greece,'' she advises him during a discussion of his sex life. ''We're in Mayfair.'') Natasha Little is Augusta
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TV WEEKEND; The Dissolute Lifestyle Of a Charmer and a Poet
NYTimes - over 11 years
Promos for ''Byron,'' a biographical movie about Lord Byron, suggest a Regency comedy of manners, but actually the poet's story is a bit smuttier than ''Pride and Prejudice.'' This BBC production is more like a Jane Austen ''Satyricon.'' ''Byron'' begins in 1811 when the young British aristocrat (Jonny Lee Miller) is on a seigneurial sex tour of
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On the Cover
NYTimes - over 11 years
WATCHING ''Byron,'' a biopic about the English poet that will be shown Saturday on BBC America, you might be struck by how different the path to fame was two centuries ago compared with today. After all, nobody these days is likely to achieve celebrity status merely by writing a poem. ''Unless, of course, you count Bob Dylan,'' noted Nick Dear, who
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Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Read
NYTimes - over 11 years
LORD BYRON'S NOVEL The Evening Land. By John Crowley. 465 pp. William Morrow. $25.95. ALMOST 20 years after the publication of ''Uncle Tom's Cabin,'' in which she challenged Americans to do something about the horrific crime of slavery, Harriet Beecher Stowe challenged the British to do something about the horrific crimes of Lord Byron. In ''Lady
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; A Troublemaker Walked in Beauty
NYTimes - about 14 years
BYRON Life and Legend By Fiona MacCarthy Illustrated. 674 pages. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. $35. Lord Byron was the Mick Jagger of his time, ''mad, bad, and dangerous to know,'' in the words of his tragic admirer Caroline Lamb. He was a curly-haired, pouty-lipped heartthrob, though inclined to plumpness and a dieter and exerciser worthy of the 21st
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Need a Sure Way to Settle an Argument Or Hide a Scandal? Burn the Letters
NYTimes - about 19 years
No blaze imparts more enduring heat than the bonfire that consumes the private papers of someone interesting and important. When the British poet Ted Hughes destroyed the final volume of Sylvia Plath's journals after her suicide in 1963, he said it was to protect the couple's two children. Instead, Plath's advocates and biographers insist, he
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Mad, Bad, Still Hard to Know
NYTimes - about 24 years
BYRON By Sigrid Combuchen. Translated by Joan Tate. 518 pp. North Pomfret, Vt.: Heinemann/Trafalgar Square. $24.95. GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON, remains the most notorious of the Romantic poets because he was, as Lady Caroline Lamb put it, "mad -- bad -- and dangerous to know." Mad enough to swim the Hellespont; bad enough to drink wine from a monk's
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How Lord Byron Became Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: To the Editor: To the Editor: Having done research for a novelized version of Lord Byron's love affair with his half-sister, I should like to comment on James O'Rourke's letter (''Byron Demythified,'' March 11). The statement that Byron was ''mad, bad and dangerous to know'' comes from Lady Caroline Lamb after their first meeting, when the
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WEEKENDER GUIDE
NYTimes - about 31 years
Friday A LITERARY READING Robertson Davies, the Canadian novelist, essayist and playwright, will appear tonight at the Writer's Voice, a literary series at the West Side Y.M.C.A. Arts Center. Mr. Davies is the author of more than two dozen books, including the Deptford Trilogy, which consists of ''Fifth Business,'' ''The Manticore'' and ''World of
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MUSIC NOTES; REVISED 'LORD BYRON' RETURNS
NYTimes - about 31 years
''Lord Byron is pretty good opera material, you know,'' Virgil Thomson said the other day. ''Don't forget that in addition to being a poet, he was also a genius, a lord, a millionaire and a beauty. He was world famous by the age of 21. With all that going for you, you have to misbehave every day, just to cut yourself down to size.'' And so Mr.
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MUCH GOSSIP AND A LITTLE MELANCHOLY
NYTimes - over 34 years
LORD BYRON Selected Letters and Journals. Edited by Leslie A. Marchand. 400 pp. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap/Harvard University Press. $17.50. BYRON'S letters were all written away from home to someone at home - their home, not his. Here was a man whose often lunatic mother was descended from King James I and whose father's family estates came from
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Augusta Leigh
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1851
    Age 68
    Died in 1851.
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  • 1849
    Age 66
    Medora died on 28 August 1849 at Lapeyre, Aveyron, southern France, and is believed to be buried there.
    More Details Hide Details Augusta is also the subject of Byron's Epistle to Augusta (1816) and Stanzas to Augusta.
  • 1846
    Age 63
    Medora travelled in poverty and eventually met Monsieur Jean-Louis Taillefer whom she married in Aveyron, France on 23 August 1846.
    More Details Hide Details In 1846 they had a son, Elie Taillefer, who lived until 22 June 1900. Marie Violette took the surname of her stepfather and became Marie Violette Taillefer.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1838
    Age 55
    In 1838, Henry Trevanion and Medora Leigh finally parted permanently.
    More Details Hide Details In an autobiography, Medora later wrote of Henry that he "gave himself up to religion and shooting". Henry died in 1855 in Brittany, France. Medora left for the south of France with her daughter Marie Violette, who later entered a convent and became known as Sister Saint Hillaire. Marie Violette is said to have died within the order she joined in 1873.
  • 1834
    Age 51
    Medora became a Catholic and declared her intention of entering a convent. However, she got pregnant again by Henry. The Abbess was tolerant and found Medora lodgings outside the convent, where a living child was born on 19 May 1834; she was baptised Marie Violette Trevanion on 21 May 1834.
    More Details Hide Details See page 116 of "Byron's Daughter" by Catherine Turney (1975) biography of Elizabeth Medora Leigh Due to poverty and illness, the pair eventually had to beg their families for money. Henry's father, Major John Purnell Bettesworth Trevanion of Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, thought Medora was to blame for the situation. He sent one of Henry's uncles to Brittany to persuade Henry to return to England. Henry refused to leave. Augusta Maria (Byron) Leigh was now keeping her other daughter Georgiana's three children by Henry, but sent what money she could to Medora. However, Augusta eventually lost touch with Medora, who had become ill in Brittany after a series of miscarriages.
  • FORTIES
  • 1833
    Age 50
    By 1833 Henry and Medora were living in Brittany, at the Breton Carhaix.
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  • 1829
    Age 46
    There was personal unhappiness too, when Henry Trevanion, husband of one daughter Georgiana left her in 1829 - 30 (after four years of marriage) for her younger sister Elizabeth Medora (allegedly fathered by Lord Byron).
    More Details Hide Details Medora and Henry Trevanion remained together for several years in France, before finally separating. The deserted Georgiana, doubly betrayed, lacked the funds to apply for a Parliamentary divorce unlike another similarly wronged wife Louisa Turton (Turton vs Turton).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1822
    Age 39
    Neither Medora nor her mother met Byron's daughter by Claire Clairmont, Allegra Byron, who died at age five in 1822 in an Italian convent.
    More Details Hide Details Medora had 6 (possible half) siblings by her mother and her husband Colonel George Leigh of the 10th Dragoons. One of her sisters, Georgiana Augusta Leigh, married Henry Bettesworth Trevanion. The marriage between Georgiana and Henry was not harmonious and Medora was often used as a "chaperone". Medora's life became more complicated as a result. Medora's father, Colonel Leigh, subsequently discovered that she was pregnant with a child by Henry Trevanion (her brother-in-law). Colonel Leigh sent Medora to an establishment in Maida Vale, London, where upper-class girls went to have their illegitimate offspring. Henry arranged for her escape. Henry Bettesworth Trevanion and Medora went to Normandy, where her child was stillborn. However, Henry was so infatuated with Medora that he wanted a living child by her. Henry ran away again with Medora and prevailed on her to set up in an ancient, tumble-down chateau near Morlaix in France. There they lived as brother and sister and passed as such, for they looked very much alike. With no idea of money on either side they were reduced to poverty; as aristocratic delinquents they never considered turning their hands to work. In exile they used the surname AUBIN.
  • 1814
    Age 31
    "Medora" is the name of one of the heroines in Byron's poem The Corsair, which was written at Newstead Abbey during the three weeks in January 1814 when the poet and a pregnant Augusta were snowbound there together.
    More Details Hide Details However, Augusta's husband, George, never questioned the paternity of Medora, and she grew up among her brothers and sisters unaware that she might be the first of Byron's three daughters. In fact, they were entertained by his in-laws at the family home in Leicestershire for several weeks after Byron had married Annabella Milbanke. At that time Augusta wrote to her sister-in-law about Medora, saying: "The likeness to Byron... makes her very good-humoured". In another she wrote, knowing it would be shown to Byron, "Here comes Medora". Medora did become aware of her possible paternity years later and she and her child were assisted financially by Augusta Ada Byron (better known by her later name of Ada Lovelace), who was also a source of emotional support when Medora fell on hard times.
    There is some evidence to support the incest accusation. Augusta Leigh's third daughter, born in spring of 1814, was christened Elizabeth Medora Leigh.
    More Details Hide Details A few days after the birth, Byron went to his sister's house Swynford Paddocks in Cambridgeshire to see the child, and wrote, in a letter to Lady Melbourne, his confidante: "Oh, but it is not an ape, and it is worth while" (a child of an incestuous relationship was thought likely to be deformed).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1804
    Age 21
    Augusta's half-brother, George Lord Byron, didn't meet her until he went to Harrow School and even then only very rarely. From 1804 onwards, however, she wrote to him regularly and became his confidante especially in his quarrels with his mother.
    More Details Hide Details Their correspondence ceased for two years after Byron had gone abroad, and was not resumed until she sent him a letter expressing her sympathy on the death of his mother, Catherine. Not having been brought up together they were almost like strangers to each other. But they got on well together and appear to have fallen in love with each other. When Byron's marriage collapsed and he sailed away from England never to return, rumours of incest, a very serious and scandalous offence, were rife. Some say it was because of his fear of prosecution that Byron abandoned his country.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1783
    Age 0
    Born in 1783.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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