Barbara Carrera
Nicaraguan-American model and actress
Barbara Carrera
Barbara Carrera is a Nicaraguan-born American film and television actress as well as a former model. She is best known for her roles as Bond girl Fatima Blush in Never Say Never Again and as Angelica Nero on the soap opera Dallas.
Biography
Barbara Carrera's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Barbara Carrera from around the web
MLB Unlikely to Bar Cabrera From Batting Title
ABC News - over 4 years
MLB appears unlikely to interfere if suspended Giants OF Melky Cabrera wins NL batting title
Article Link:
ABC News article
'Divas Latinas' en acción - La Opinión
Google News - over 5 years
La más memorable fue Barbara Carrera, sobre todo en la escena que aparece en bikini y donde interpreta a una "femme fatale" en la cinta "Never Say Never Again". Aquí interpretó a Fatima Blush junto al James Bond, Sean Connery
Article Link:
Google News article
Giorgio di Sant' Angelo fashion retrospective to open in Phoenix - Los Angeles Times (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
... designer but an artist who works in fashion -- an engineer of color and form." Sounds like another designer with a major museum retrospective right now: Alexander McQueen. Photo: Designer Giorgio di Sant' Angelo and model Barbara Carrera in 1968
Article Link:
Google News article
La revedere, Sean Connery! - CinemaRx
Google News - almost 6 years
Printre fetele Bond ale lui Sean Connery au fost Ursula Andress, Lana Wood, Barbara Carrera, Jill St. John și Kim Basinger. Dintre toate cele șapte filme ale sale cu Bond, Connery îl preferă pe al doilea, “From Russia with Love“
Article Link:
Google News article
Capulets and Montagues As Rival Bronx Caterers
NYTimes - over 20 years
Just when you thought romance was dead and comedy was buried in the adjacent crypt, along comes ''Love Is All There Is.'' This buoyant, wickedly funny comedy drags Shakespeare's tragic ''Romeo and Juliet'' out of medieval Verona, plants it kicking and screaming on 20th-century City Island in the Bronx and turns it on its head in a boisterous
Article Link:
NYTimes article
TELEVISION; The Dishes Done? O.K., You Can Watch Lifetime
NYTimes - over 23 years
Lifetime television likes to call itself the women's cable network. Its ads for "L.A. Law" focus on the series' sexy male stars. There's no football on New Year's Day. And it did, after all, save "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd," that paean to urban female angst, when NBC canceled it in 1989. But Molly isn't on anymore, not even in reruns. And
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NYTimes article
Trouble Goes to Hawaii For 'Murder in Paradise'
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: ''Murder in Paradise,'' tonight's ''NBC Movie of the Week,'' is about the burned-out New York City cop of the week. Charlie Raski can be encountered at 9 P.M. beach-bumming and bar-boozing in Hawaii. His problem is that he still wakes up sweating to nightmares about a murderer who killed his wife and eight other people back home with a nylon
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NYTimes article
Reviews/Film; A Youth's Salty Specialty On a Pizza-Delivery Route
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: ''Lover Boy'' should have had the courage to admit it is hopelessly tacky. Why fight it, when the film's recurring joke is that ''extra anchovies'' is a code for sex? ''Lover Boy'' should have had the courage to admit it is hopelessly tacky. Why fight it, when the film's recurring joke is that ''extra anchovies'' is a code for sex? Randy
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NYTimes article
IN BRIEF: RECENT FILMS ON CASSETTES
NYTimes - over 32 years
The following recent theatrical films are now available for home viewing. Excerpts are from reviews by Times critics. NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN Starring Sean Connery, Barbara Carrera, Klaus Maria Brandauer, Max von Sydow and Edward Fox; directed by Irvin Kershner, 1983. Warner Home Video 134 minutes. $79.95 The latest in the Bond series, this one
Article Link:
NYTimes article
TV REVIEWS ; 'SINS OF THE PAST' HAS MANY TYPES
NYTimes - almost 33 years
TELEVISION writers are always trying to devise plots that will encompass the biggest number of contrasting ''types'' within a single situation. The effort has something to do with expanding story possibilities and establishing broad audience identification. Say this for ''Sins of the Past,'' tonight's television movie on ABC-TV at 9 o'clock: Its
Article Link:
NYTimes article
SEAN CONNERY IS SEASONED JAMES BOND
NYTimes - over 33 years
ONE of the key questions of the current film season can now be answered: This is the better Bond, and by a wide margin. It's not a matter of casting - though Sean Connery makes a welcome return in ''Never Say Never Again,'' Roger Moore has certainly done nicely with the role - but rather one of creaks. Last summer's ''Octopussy'' reworked the same
Article Link:
NYTimes article
TOPICAL ISSUES LEND SPECIAL DRAMA TO MOVIES
NYTimes - over 33 years
Filmmakers, perhaps taking their lead from the widely popular television docu- dramas of recent seasons, not to mention the kudos garnered by ''Gandhi'' last year, seem to be making a marked departure from the heroics and outright fantasy that have dominated movie screens of late, with the result that political issues figure unusually prominently
Article Link:
NYTimes article
VILLAINY DISPATCHED IN EL PASO
NYTimes - almost 34 years
In ''Lone Wolf McQuade,'' which opened yesterday at the Loews State and other theaters, Chuck Norris plays a rugged, weathered, twofisted, two-footed Texas Ranger who, at key moments, throws down his guns to indulge his talents in the martial arts. Mr. Norris is good, and he looks enough like David Carradine, who plays the principal villain, to be
Article Link:
NYTimes article
'I, THE JURY' BRINGS BACK MIKE HAMMER'S NEW YORK
NYTimes - over 34 years
THE film ''I the Jury,'' which opened Saturday at the National and other theaters, has something to do with the Central Intelligence Agency and a sex therapy clinic. More than that is hard to guess. Directed by Richard T. Heffron, photographed on location in New York City by Andrew Laszlow and coaxed along by Bill Conti's witty score, the movie
Article Link:
NYTimes article
AT THE MOVIES; From novelist to playwright to director.
NYTimes - over 34 years
''JOSEPHA,'' the French movie that is at the Paris Theater, was written and directed by Christopher Frank. It was his virgin directing effort in films, but to him, writing and directing are not so different. ''You're telling a story,'' he says, ''but instead of a pen and paper you've got actors and a camera.'' Mr. Frank calls himself ''a phony
Article Link:
NYTimes article
MANILA FILM FESTIVAL PROVES ALL-OUT SPECTACULAR
NYTimes - about 35 years
From the start, the First Manila International Film Festival promised to be like no other film festival. A production masterminded by the Philippines' First Lady, Imelda Marcos, the festival was designed to promote the Philippines as the Ca nnes of theEast. ''The Philippines is in a strategic position - it is both East and West, right and left,
Article Link:
NYTimes article
'CONDORMAN,' ESPIONAGE SPOOF
NYTimes - over 35 years
IT'S a bird! It's a plane! It's a spoof, although you can't be sure because these days who can tell? ''Condorman,'' the new Walt Disney film at the Guild and other neighborhood theaters, is a spy movie, sort of, that looks a little like ''Superman'' and a lot like a James Bond, and is meant for the family trade. It is painless and chaste, and it
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NYTimes article
At the Movies; ON BEING 18 AND MISSING THE REVOLUTION; by Chris Chase; On being 18 and missing the Revolution.
NYTimes - almost 36 years
IN the summer of 1979, the French picture called ''Peppermint Soda'' opened in New York to ecstatic reviews. Diane Kurys, then 29 years old, born in Lyons of Russian emigre parents, had written it, directed it, had, in fact, lived it. Last Sunday, ''Cocktail Molotov,'' the sequel to ''Peppermint Soda,'' opened in New York. In ''Cocktail Molotov,''
Article Link:
NYTimes article
TV View; 'MASADA'- A MINI-SERIES ON A GRAND SCALE
NYTimes - almost 36 years
Snuggling into an epic is one of life's more enjoyable pursuits. The ingredients get served up on a grand scale: historic sweep, heightened confrontations, explosive passions. When those components work well together, the book or movie can be irresistible. The film adaptation of ''Gone With the Wind,'' Margaret Mitchell's interpretation of the
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Barbara Carrera
    FIFTIES
  • 2002
    Age 56
    In May 2002, her works were exhibited at the Hollywood Entertainment Museum and have typically been sold for up to $8,000.
    More Details Hide Details Carrera has not appeared in films or television since 2004. Carrera has been married and divorced three times, her spouses being: After her third marriage, Carrera was involved with Henry Percy, 11th Duke of Northumberland and, later, with, a Scottish-born biographer and journalist. She has no children.
  • 1997
    Age 51
    In 1997, she was appointed ambassador-at-large for Nicaragua by then-president Arnoldo Alemán.
    More Details Hide Details She is also an artist and her work has been showcased in the Makk Galleries in Beverly Hills, California since the 1980s, and the Roy Miles Gallery in London, England.
  • FORTIES
  • 1988
    Age 42
    She also starred as Emma Forsayth in the miniseries Emma: Queen of the South Seas in 1988.
    More Details Hide Details Carrera has appeared on the pages and covers of such magazines as Vogue, Paris Match, Harper's Bazaar, and twice posed for Playboy (July 1977 and March 1982).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1978
    Age 32
    On television, she played a part in the soap opera Dallas as Angelica Nero, and more prominently, in the historical miniseries Centennial in 1978 and Masada (opposite Peter O'Toole and Peter Strauss) in 1981.
    More Details Hide Details These roles brought her to the mainstream attention of American audiences.
  • 1976
    Age 30
    In 1976, she earned her first Golden Globe nomination ("New Star of the Year -- Actress") for her role in The Master Gunfighter.
    More Details Hide Details She later played in such films as The Island of Dr. Moreau, Lone Wolf McQuade, Condorman, Point of Impact, Tryst and Embryo. For her portrayal of the villainess Fatima Blush in the James Bond film Never Say Never Again, she earned a 1984 Golden Globe nomination for "Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture". She worked opposite Laurence Olivier in Wild Geese II the following year.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1972
    Age 26
    In 1972, she appeared on the screen in a publicity role for the Chiquita bananas.
    More Details Hide Details Her first film role was as a fashion model in Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1970), which fared poorly at the box office.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1953
    Age 7
    Although she prefers to say 1953, public records state 1944.
    More Details Hide Details Her mother, Florencia Carrera, was a Nicaraguan of European and Native ancestry, and her father, Louis Kingsbury, was a U.S. employee of the American embassy in Nicaragua. Her parents separated when she was seven. Carrera had at least one elder half-sibling, a sister, Maisie Kingsbury. Sometime after the age of ten, Carrera moved to the United States to live with her father, who placed her in a school in Memphis. She moved to New York at the age of fifteen. Kingsbury began a career as a model at the Eileen Ford agency at the age of 17, at which point she changed her last name to her mother's maiden name, Carrera.
  • 1947
    Age 1
    Barbara Kingsbury was born in San Carlos, Río San Juan, Nicaragua. Some sources give her birth year as 1947 or 1951, but most list 1945.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1945
    Born
    Born on December 31, 1945.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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