Barbara Cartland
British writer
Barbara Cartland
Dame Barbara Hamilton Cartland, DBE, CStJ (9 July 1901 – 21 May 2000), was an English author, one of the most prolific authors of the 20th century. As Barbara Cartland she is known for her numerous fictional romantic novels, but she also wrote under her married name Barbara McCorquodale.
Biography
Barbara Cartland's personal information overview.
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News
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Diary: Compound interests - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
By High Street Ken AP As this column noted on Tuesday, in 1990 the Colonel placed an order with Foyles bookshop in London for a large consignment of romance novels by the late Dame Barbara Cartland, who claimed to be the Libyan despot's "favourite
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Diary: Gaddafi daffy for Cartland - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
And where better to escape than into one of the 723 tomes by Dame Barbara Cartland, reputedly the Libyan dictator's favourite writer? In 1990, Gaddafi placed an order with Foyles bookshop in London for a large consignment of the late Dame Barbara's
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Collins's class on display - The Australian
Google News - over 5 years
If the 78-year-old Collins's taste is not quite Barbara Cartland, it is rather old-school Hollywood. Husband No 5, Percy Gibson, 32 years her junior, gazes warmly at her from another room. It's hard to see where Gibson could put his feet up in this
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Sex, psychics and Moos of the World - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
The National Farmers Union — never exactly Barbara Cartland, let alone Jackie Collins — says that this is 'a useful management tool to help optimise performance'. But the week's biggest cow-based story concerns a Bavarian dairy cow called Yvonne who,
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Curse you, Manatee!! - Albany Times Union (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
She read them voraciously, and she had bookshelves and bookshelves of them – Harlequin Romance novels and Barbara Cartland love novels… I tried reading one once. Awful. Definitely NOT my cup of decaf. She used to buy them at the bookstores,
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This is the most sexist TV commercial of all time - Jalopnik
Google News - over 5 years
... business meeting, where I also finger-banged a cocktail waitress in the coat closet at the Denver Hilton, just in time to stave off this one's goddamn nervous breakdown. Thanks honey, I'll take it from here. You go back to your Barbara Cartland novel
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Barbara Cartland stole plots, rival author alleged in furious letters - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Dame Barbara Cartland, whose romantic novels have already sold over a billion copies worldwide, faced furious allegations of plagiarism, previously unpublished letters that were sent in 1950 reveal. The writer Georgette Heyer accused Cartland of trying
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Nancy Dell'Olio: 'I'm very innocent' - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
A character modelled on Dame Barbara Cartland used to appear in Little Britain, lying on a chaise longue and purloining words from any source that came to hand in order to fill her romantic novels
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Georgette Heyer decries plagiarism with her rapier wit - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
As Benedicte Page reports at the Bookseller, a new biography of the author, due out this autumn, will see her fury at Barbara Cartland for allegedly plagiarising her work in the 1950s revealed in all its glory. by Jennifer Kloester Angry at the
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This Day in history - July 9 - Jamaica Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Frederich Henle, German pathologist and anatomist (1809-1885); Elias Howe, US inventor of sewing machine (1819-1867); Nikola Tesla, Serbian-American inventor (1856-1943); Barbara Cartland, British writer (1901-2000); Morocco's King Hassan (1929-1999);
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Does what you read affect your sex life? - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Are you more Barbara Cartland than Belle de Jour? According to psychologist Susan Quilliam, romantic novels are to blame for a host of modern ills, including unprotected sex, unplanned pregnancies, unrealistic sexual expectations and relationship
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Birmingham voted 'least romantic and most boring city in Europe' - Metro
Google News - over 5 years
Brummies call it 'the Venice of the north' and Dame Barbara Cartland was born there – but Birmingham has been voted Europe's least romantic city. It also won the 'award' for most boring place on the continent in a survey of 3500 tourists
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HASH(0x9b5f21c) - eTaiwan News
Google News - over 5 years
Frederich Henle, German pathologist and anatomist (1809-1885); Elias Howe, US inventor of sewing machine (1819-1867); Nikola Tesla, Serbian-American inventor (1856-1943); Barbara Cartland, British writer (1901-2000); Morocco's King Hassan (1929-1999);
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Prince Harry and Florence Brudenell-Bruce: Will the Queen approve? - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
Last week, at a posh pre-Wimbledon party, Florence confirmed she had split from her latest boyfriend, Henry St George, who like Flee, sounds like a character from a Barbara Cartland novel. He's the son of the late multi-millionaire financier Edward St
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Duchess Kate, Jane Austen Are Cousins - Us Magazine
Google News - over 5 years
I know for a fact that Barbara Cartland's daughter was Lady Di's stepmother. Lady Di used to read lots of Barbara's romance books and something rub on her to get her prince but she was blind sided and didn't see that most princes have some mistress
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Parents, let your children be children - Norfolk Eastern Daily Press (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The poor girl is then smeared with more make-up than Barbara Cartland, and dolled up in revealing clothes and a pair of boots. It is wrong, it is exploitative and it is abusive. It happens because too many parents think that their children are toys,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Barbara Cartland
    THIRTIES
  • 2000
    Her last project was to be filmed and interviewed for her life story (directed by Steven Glen for Blue Melon Films). The documentary, Virgins and Heroes, includes unique early home cine footage and Dame Barbara launching her website with pink computers, in early 2000.
    More Details Hide Details At that time, her publishers estimated that since her writing career began in 1925, Cartland had produced a total of 723 titles. Some papers of Barbara Cartland are held at The Women's Library at the Library of the London School of Economics, ref 7BCA
    Cartland died peacefully in her sleep, on 21 May 2000, seven weeks before her 99th birthday (and the same day as prominent British actor Sir John Gielgud), at her residence, Camfield Place, near Hatfield, Hertfordshire.
    More Details Hide Details She had been suffering from ill health and dementia for six months beforehand, and was subsequently bedridden and sequestered. Both of her sons, Ian and Glen McCorquodale, were present at her bedside when she died. Shortly afterward, Cartland's daughter from her first marriage, Raine, travelled to the family home. After originally deciding she would like to be buried in her local parish church, featuring a coffin of marble construction, covered in angels, this was later changed; Cartland was buried in a cardboard coffin, because of her concerns for environmental issues. She was interred at her private estate in Hatfield, Hertfordshire, under a tree that had been planted by Queen Elizabeth I. Cartland left behind a series of 160 unpublished novels, known as the Barbara Cartland Pink Collection. These are being published in ebook format by her son Ian McCorquodale; each month, a new novel is published from the collection.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1997
    Cartland did not get on with her step-granddaughter Diana, Princess of Wales, who notably did not invite Cartland to her wedding to the Prince of Wales. Cartland was openly critical of Diana's subsequent divorce, though the rift between them was mended shortly before Diana's fatal car crash in Paris, in 1997.
    More Details Hide Details According to Tina Brown's book on the late Princess, Cartland once remarked, "The only books Diana ever read were mine, and they weren't awfully good for her." After a year as a gossip columnist for the Daily Express, Cartland published her first novel, Jigsaw (1923), a risqué society thriller that became a bestseller. She also began writing and producing somewhat racy plays, one of which, Blood Money (1926), was banned by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. In the 1920s and 1930s, Cartland was a prominent young hostess in London society, noted for her beauty, energetic charm, and daring parties. Her fashion sense also had a part, and she was one of the first clients of designer Norman Hartnell; she remained a client until he died in 1979. He made her presentation and wedding dresses; the latter was made to her own design against Hartnell's wishes, and she admitted it was a failure.
  • 1991
    In 1991, Cartland was invested by Queen Elizabeth II as a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in honour of the author's almost 70 years of literary, political, and social contributions.
    More Details Hide Details A waxwork of Cartland is on display at Madame Tussauds, though according to her son Ian, Cartland was displeased because it wasn't "pretty enough". Cartland's physical and mental health, particularly eyesight, began to fail in her mid-90s, but she remained a favourite with the press, granting interviews to international news agencies even during the final months of her life. Two notable interviews were with the BBC and U.S. journalist Randy Bryan Bigham, in 2000 (see image).
  • TEENAGE
  • 1988
    In January, 1988, Cartland received the Medaille de Vermeil de la Ville de Paris, the highest honour of the city of Paris, for publishing 25 million books in France.
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  • 1984
    In 1984, she was awarded the Bishop Wright Air Industry Award for this contribution.
    More Details Hide Details She regularly attended Brooklands aerodrome and motor-racing circuit during the 1920s and 30s, and the Brooklands Museum has preserved a sitting-room from that era and named it after her. After the death during World War II of her brother Ronald Cartland, a Conservative Member of Parliament, Cartland published a biography of him with a preface by the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill. The war marked the beginning of a lifelong interest in civic welfare and politics for Cartland, who served the War Office in various charitable capacities as well as the St. John Ambulance Brigade. In 1953, she was invested at Buckingham Palace as a Commander of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem for her services.
  • 1983
    Additionally, in 1983, Cartland wrote 23 novels, earning her the Guinness World Record for the most novels written in a single year.
    More Details Hide Details In the mid-1990s, by which time she had sold over a billion books, Vogue called Cartland "the true Queen of Romance". She became a mainstay of the popular media in her trademark pink dresses and plumed hats, discoursing on matters of love, marriage, politics, religion, health, and fashion. She was publicly opposed to the removal of prayer from state schools, and spoke against infidelity and divorce, although she admitted to being acquainted with both of these subjects. Privately, Cartland took an interest in the early gliding movement. Although aerotowing for launching gliders first occurred in Germany, she thought of long-distance tows in 1931 and did a 200-mile (360 km) tow in a two-seater glider. The idea led to troop-carrying gliders.
    Despite their tame storylines, Cartland's later novels were highly successful. By 1983, she rated the longest entry in Who's Who (though most of that article was a list of her books), and she was named the top-selling author in the world by the Guinness World Records.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1979
    Cartland maintained a long friendship with Lord Mountbatten of Burma, whose 1979 death she said was the "greatest sadness of my life". Mountbatten supported Cartland in her various charitable works, particularly for United World Colleges, and even helped her write her book Love at the Helm, providing background naval and historical information. The Mountbatten Memorial Trust, established by Mountbatten's great-nephew Charles, Prince of Wales after Mountbatten was assassinated in Ireland, was the recipient of the proceeds of this book on its release in 1980.
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  • OTHER
  • 1963
    Cartland and her second husband, who died in 1963, had two sons, Ian McCorquodale (born in 1937), a former Debretts publisher, and Glen McCorquodale (born in 1939), a stockbroker.
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  • 1955
    In 1955, Cartland was elected a councillor on Hertfordshire County Council as a Conservative and served for nine years.
    More Details Hide Details During this time she campaigned successfully for nursing home reform, improvement in the salaries of midwives, and the legalization of education for the children of Gypsies. She also founded the National Association of Health, promoting a variety of medications and remedies, including an anti-aging cream and a so-called "brain pill" for increasing mental energy. In 1978, Cartland released An Album of Love Songs through State Records, produced by Sir Norman Newell. The album featured Cartland performing a series of popular standards with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, including "I'll Follow My Secret Heart" and "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square".
  • 1947
    Their daughter, Raine McCorquodale (born in 1929), who Cartland later alleged was the daughter of George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 5th Duke of Sutherland or Prince George, Duke of Kent, became "Deb of the Year" in 1947.
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  • 1940
    This was followed soon afterward by her father's death on a Flanders battlefield, in World War I. However, Cartland's enterprising mother opened a London dress shop to make ends meet, and to raise Cartland and her two brothers, both of whom were eventually killed in battle in 1940.
    More Details Hide Details Cartland was educated at private girl schools: The Alice Ottley School, Malvern Girls' College, and Abbey House, an educational institution in Hampshire, Cartland soon became successful as a society reporter since 1922 and a writer of romantic fiction. Cartland admitted she was inspired in her early work by the novels of Edwardian author Elinor Glyn, whom she idolized and eventually befriended.
  • 1933
    After the McCorquodales' 1933 divorce, which involved charges and countercharges of infidelity, Cartland married her former husband's cousin, Hugh McCorquodale, on 28th December, 1936, in Guildfield, London a former military officer.
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  • 1927
    According to an obituary published in The Daily Telegraph, Cartland reportedly broke off her first engagement, to a Guards officer, when she learned about sexual intercourse and recoiled. This claim fits with her image as part of a generation for whom such matters were never discussed, but sits uneasily with her having produced work controversial at the time for its sexual subject matter, as described above. she was married to Captain Alexander "Sachie" George McCorquodale, on 23 April, 1927, a British Army officer from Scotland and heir to a printing fortune.
    More Details Hide Details They divorced in 1933, and he died from heart failure in 1964.
  • 1901
    Born in 1901.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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