Barbara Stanwyck
Actress
Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck was an Academy Award nominated American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang and Frank Capra. After a short but notable career as a stage actress in the late 1920s, she made 85 films in 38 years in Hollywood, before turning to television.
Biography
Barbara Stanwyck's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Barbara Stanwyck
News
News abour Barbara Stanwyck from around the web
Will HBO Arbuckle Bio Tell the Truth About Early Hollywood? - AVN News (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
... countless affairs (including plenty of rough sex) and who, in the words of frequent co-star Bette Davis, "slept with every star at MGM ... of both sexes," counting Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Barbara Stanwyck and Marilyn Monroe among her lovers?
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Majors gives in to adoring fans - Toronto Sun
Google News - over 5 years
The Michigan-born actor broke into TV opposite Barbara Stanwyck in 1965 as Heath Barclay on The Big Valley. In 1969, he was cast in another sort of "hat" role, as one of the two leads in the classic Midnight Cowboy (the male hustler role that
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VIDEO; Streaming Video's Emerging Bounty
NYTimes - over 5 years
AT this point in its evolution streaming video can still feel like your neighborhood VHS rental shop, circa 1985. The shelves of the two leading services, Netflix Instant and Hulu Plus, seem to be full of films you've never heard of, arranged in no particular order. The latest hits haven't arrived yet, and there's no one around to help you out
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Streaming Video's Emerging Bounty - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Netflix, for example, makes it possible to follow the late career of Mitchell Leisen, one of Paramount's most gifted contract directors, with five otherwise unseeable films including the noirish melodrama “No Man of Her Own,” starring Barbara Stanwyck
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When television Westerns were pretty dang good - Orlando Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
(And don't say Barbara Stanwyck.) •About those actors above: Would two of them have had their he-men images if their screen names had been Charles Connors and Steven McQueen? •I hope young folks in America aren't as lost as Jesse Pinkman on "Breaking
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Introducing: The rising star of Brit Marling - CBS News
Google News - over 5 years
"How do you know Barbara Stanwyck?" Mason asked. "I love - think she's such an interesting example of how to be a woman," Marling explained. "She's so sexy. But she's in control of her sex appeal. And she's smart." Marling is no dummy either: she
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Ghostbuster Mary Ann Makes a 'Spirited' Appearance Here - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Most famous ghost she's met: Barbara Stanwyck. It was on the set of Ghost Whisperer. Mary Ann couldn't remember her name and cried out, "Oh, it's Victoria Barkley (Stanwyck's role on the TV show Big Valley)." She said she did get Stanwyck to cross over
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What Kate Wore: Calgary - National Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But with its pintucked waist and pleated yoke detailing, this particular Packham frock looks too literally like a day dress lifted from the 1940s – one that Barbara Stanwyck, Carole Lombard or Rita Hayworth would have worn for a casual photo call on
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CBS Drama to repeat The Colbys - ATV Today
Google News - over 5 years
The Colbys starred Stephanie Beacham, Charlton Heston, Emma Samms, Tracy Scoggins, Maxwell Caulfield, Barbara Stanwyck, Katherine Ross and Ricardo Montalban. The series also featured crossovers with parent series Dynasty as actors John Forsythe,
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Exclusive extract from 'My Dolce Vita: A Memoir' - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Taylor arrived with one wife, Barbara Stanwyck, had an affair with an Italian starlet which precipitated a divorce and left Rome with a second wife, Ursula Thiess. And I was there to greet them all. Sometimes more
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Courtroom-based films coming to Lyric - TCPalm
Google News - over 5 years
Double Indemnity (1944): Crackling dialogue by Billy Wilder and Raymond Chandler, sharp performances by Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray and Edward G. Robinson and stark black-and-white cinematography make this the essence of "film noir" (dark film)
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Forty Guns - Sky Movies
Google News - over 5 years
Barbara Stanwyck plays a Queen Bee gung-ho rancher who rules her Arizona spread with a posse of hired guns. When new marshal Griff (Barry Sullivan) turns up with his two brothers...she finds herself falling for him. Director Sam Fuller crams the action
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Book review: 'The Steal: A Cultural History of Shoplifting' by Rachel Shteir - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
She traces shoplifting's impact on literature, popular culture, politics and business, citing works as diverse as Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Confessions" and the 1940 romantic comedy "Remember the Night," starring Barbara Stanwyck
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MUSIC REVIEW | 'BARBARA CARROLL'; A Classicist Who Enjoys Wild Flights of Imagination
NYTimes - over 5 years
''The Two Mrs. Carrolls'' is the title of a well-regarded 1947 film noir starring Humphrey Bogart and Barbara Stanwyck. But it might as well describe the dual aspects of the great jazz pianist Barbara Carroll, who began an engagement at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola on Tuesday evening. There is the quiet, intimate side of Ms. Carroll, who recently
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Barbara Stanwyck
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1990
    Age 82
    Stanwyck died on January 20, 1990 of congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at age 82 at Saint John's Health Center.
    More Details Hide Details She had indicated that she wished for no funeral service. In accordance with her wishes, her remains were cremated and the ashes scattered from a helicopter over Lone Pine, California, where she had made some of her western films.
  • 1982
    Age 74
    The following year, in 1982, while filming The Thorn Birds, the inhalation of special-effects smoke on the set may have caused her to contract bronchitis, which was compounded by her cigarette habit; she had been a smoker from age nine until four years before her death.
    More Details Hide Details
    She received an Honorary Oscar at the 1982 Academy Award ceremony and the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1986.
    More Details Hide Details She was also the recipient of honorary lifetime awards from the American Film Institute (1987), the Film Society of Lincoln Center (1986), the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (1981) and the Screen Actors Guild (1967). Stanwyck received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960 and was ranked as the 11th greatest female star of classic American cinema by the American Film Institute.
  • 1981
    Age 73
    Stanwyck's retirement years were active, with charity work outside the limelight. She was awakened in the middle of the night inside her home in the exclusive Trousdale section of Beverly Hills in 1981 by an intruder, who hit her on the head with his flashlight, then forced her into a closet while he robbed her of $40,000 in jewels.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1950
    Age 42
    He appeared in two films that starred his famous sibling: The File on Thelma Jordon and No Man of Her Own, both released in 1950. He and actress Caryl Lincoln married in 1934 and remained together until his death from a heart attack.
    More Details Hide Details They had one son, Brian.
    In 1950, Stanwyck and Taylor mutually decided to divorce, and after his insistence, she proceeded with the official filing of the papers.
    More Details Hide Details There have been many rumors regarding the cause of their divorce, but after World War II, Taylor had attempted to create a life away from Hollywood, a goal that Stanwyck did not share. Taylor had romantic affairs, and there were unsubstantiated rumors about Stanwyck having had affairs as well. After the divorce, they acted together in Stanwyck's last feature film, The Night Walker (1964). She never remarried and cited Taylor as the love of her life, according to her friend and Big Valley co-star Linda Evans. She took his death in 1969 very hard and took a long break from film and television work.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1944
    Age 36
    Stanwyck became an early member of the Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals (MPA) with its founding in 1944.
    More Details Hide Details The mission of this special interest group, a coalition to monitor the content of Hollywood films, was to " combat... subversive methods in the industry to undermine and change the American way of life." She went on to publicly support the investigations of HUAC, House Committee on Un-American Activities, both she and her husband Robert Taylor appearing to testify as what was termed friendly witnesses. Stanwyck shared conservative Republican affiliation with such contemporaries as Walt Disney, Hedda Hopper, Randolph Scott, Robert Young, Ward Bond, William Holden, Ginger Rogers, Jimmy Stewart, George Murphy, Gary Cooper, Bing Crosby, John Wayne, Walter Brennan, Shirley Temple, Bob Hope, Adolphe Menjou, Helen Hayes, director Frank Capra, and her Double Indemnity co-star, Fred MacMurray. She was a fan of libertarian activist and author Ayn Rand, having persuaded Jack L. Warner at Warner Bros. to buy the rights to The Fountainhead before it was a best seller and writing to the author of her admiration of Atlas Shrugged.
  • 1939
    Age 31
    However, their 1939 marriage was arranged with the help of Taylor's studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, a common practice in Hollywood's golden age.
    More Details Hide Details Louis B. Mayer had insisted on the two stars marrying and went as far as presiding over arrangements at the wedding. She and Taylor enjoyed time together outdoors during the early years of their marriage, and owned acres of prime West Los Angeles property. Their large ranch and home in the Mandeville Canyon section of Brentwood, Los Angeles, is still referred to by the locals as the old "Robert Taylor ranch."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1936
    Age 28
    In 1936, while making the film His Brother's Wife (1936), Stanwyck became involved with her co-star, Robert Taylor.
    More Details Hide Details Rather than a torrid romance, their relationship was more one of mentor and pupil. Stanwyck served as support and adviser to the younger Taylor, a transplant from a small Nebraska town, guiding his career and acclimating him to the sophisticated Hollywood culture. The couple began living together, sparking newspaper reports about the two. Stanwyck was hesitant to remarry after the failure of her first marriage.
  • 1935
    Age 27
    The couple divorced on December 30, 1935.
    More Details Hide Details Stanwyck won custody of their adoptive son whom she had raised with a strict authoritarian hand and demanding expectations. Stanwyck and her son were estranged after his childhood, meeting only a few times after he became an adult. The child whom she had adopted in infancy "resembled her in just one respect: both were, effectively orphans."
  • 1928
    Age 20
    On August 26, 1928, Stanwyck married her Burlesque co-star, Frank Fay.
    More Details Hide Details She and Fay later claimed they disliked each other at first, but became close after Cherryman's death. A botched abortion at age fifteen had resulted in complications which left Stanwyck unable to have children, according to her biographer. After moving to Hollywood, the couple adopted a ten-month-old son on December 5, 1932. They named him Dion, later amending the name to Anthony Dion, nicknamed "Tony". The marriage was a troubled one. Fay's successful career on Broadway did not translate to the big screen, whereas Stanwyck achieved Hollywood stardom. Fay was reportedly physically abusive to his young wife, especially when he was inebriated. Some claim that this union was the basis for A Star Is Born.
    While playing in The Noose, Stanwyck reportedly fell in love with her married co-star, Rex Cherryman. Cherryman had become ill early in 1928 and his doctor advised him to take a sea voyage to Paris where he and Stanwyck had arranged to meet.
    More Details Hide Details While still at sea, he died of septic poisoning at the age of 31.
    While playing in Burlesque, Stanwyck had been introduced to her future husband, actor Frank Fay, by Oscar Levant. Stanwyck and Fay were married on August 26, 1928, and soon moved to Hollywood.
    More Details Hide Details Stanwyck's first sound film was The Locked Door (1929), followed by Mexicali Rose, released in the same year. Neither film was successful; nonetheless, Frank Capra chose Stanwyck for his Ladies of Leisure (1930). Numerous prominent roles followed, among them the children's nurse who saves two little girls from being gradually starved to death by Clark Gable's vicious character in Night Nurse (1931); So Big!, as a valiant midwest farm woman (1932); Shopworn 1932; the ambitious woman from "the wrong side of the tracks" in Baby Face (1933); the self-sacrificing title character in Stella Dallas (1937); Molly Monahan in Union Pacific (1939) with Joel McCrea; Meet John Doe as an ambitious newspaper woman with Gary Cooper (1941); the con artist who falls for her intended victim (played by Henry Fonda) in The Lady Eve (1941); the extremely successful, independent doctor Helen Hunt in You Belong to Me (1941) also with Fonda; a nightclub performer who gives a professor (played by Gary Cooper) a better understanding of "modern English" in the comedy Ball of Fire (1941); the woman who talks an infatuated insurance salesman (Fred MacMurray) into killing her husband in Double Indemnity (1944); the columnist caught up in white lies and a holiday romance in Christmas in Connecticut (1945); and the doomed wife in Sorry, Wrong Number (1948). She also played a doomed concert pianist in The Other Love (1947); the piano music was played by Ania Dorfmann, who drilled Stanwyck for three hours a day until she was able to move her arms and hands to match the music.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1927
    Age 19
    Around this time, Stanwyck was summoned by film producer Bob Kane to make a screen test for his upcoming 1927 silent film Broadway Nights.
    More Details Hide Details She lost the lead role because she could not cry in the screen test but was given a minor part as a fan dancer. This was Stanwyck's first film appearance.
  • 1923
    Age 15
    In 1923, a few months before her 16th birthday, Ruby auditioned for a place in the chorus at the Strand Roof, a night club over the Strand Theatre in Times Square.
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  • 1922
    Age 14
    A few months later, she obtained a job as a dancer in the 1922 and 1923 seasons of the Ziegfeld Follies, dancing at the New Amsterdam Theater. "I just wanted to survive and eat and have a nice coat," Stanwyck said.
    More Details Hide Details For the next several years, she worked as a chorus girl, performing from midnight to seven a.m. at nightclubs owned by Texas Guinan. She also occasionally served as a dance instructor at a speakeasy for gays and lesbians owned by Guinan. One of her good friends during those years was pianist Oscar Levant, who described her as being "wary of sophisticates and phonies." In 1926, Billy LaHiff, who owned a popular pub frequented by showpeople, introduced Ruby to impresario Willard Mack. Mack was casting his play The Noose and LaHiff suggested that the part of the chorus girl be played by a real chorus girl. Mack agreed and after a successful audition, gave the part to Ruby. She co-starred with actors Rex Cherryman and Wilfred Lucas. As initially staged, the play was not a success. In an effort to improve it, Mack decided to expand Ruby's part to include more pathos. The Noose re-opened on October 20, 1926, and became one of the most successful plays of the season, running on Broadway for nine months and 197 performances. At the suggestion of either Mack or David Belasco, Ruby changed her name to Barbara Stanwyck by combining the first name of her character, Barbara Frietchie, with Stanwyck, after the name of another actress in the play, Jane Stanwyck.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1916
    Age 8
    During the summers of 1916 and 1917, Ruby toured with Mildred, and practiced her sister's routines backstage.
    More Details Hide Details Watching the movies of Pearl White, whom Ruby idolized, also influenced her drive to be a performer. At age 14, she dropped out of school to take a job wrapping packages at a department store in Brooklyn. Ruby never attended high school, "although early biographical thumbnail sketches had her attending Brooklyn's famous Erasmus Hall High School." Soon after, she took a job filing cards at the Brooklyn telephone office for a salary of $14 a week, a salary that allowed her to become financially independent. She disliked both jobs; her real interest was to enter show business even as her sister Mildred discouraged the idea. She then took a job cutting dress patterns for Vogue magazine, but because customers complained about her work, she was fired. Her next job was as a typist for the Jerome H. Remick Music Company, a job she reportedly enjoyed. However, her continuing ambition was to work in show business and her sister finally gave up trying to dissuade her.
  • 1907
    Born
    Barbara Stanwyck was born Ruby Catherine Stevens on July 16, 1907, in Brooklyn, New York.
    More Details Hide Details She was the fifth child of Byron E. and Catherine Ann Stevens. Her parents were working class. Her father was a native of Massachusetts and her mother was an immigrant from Nova Scotia. Ruby was of English and Scottish ancestry, by her father and mother, respectively. When Ruby was four, her mother died of complications from a miscarriage after a drunken stranger accidentally knocked her off a moving streetcar. Two weeks after the funeral, Byron Stevens joined a work crew digging the Panama Canal and was never seen again. Ruby and her brother, Byron, were raised by their elder sister Mildred, who was only five years older than Ruby. When Mildred got a job as a showgirl, Ruby and Byron were placed in a series of foster homes (as many as four in a year), from which young Ruby often ran away.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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