Beatrice Lillie
Canadian actor
Beatrice Lillie
Biography
View basic information about Beatrice Lillie.
Deceased
20 January 1989
home town
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Death Place
Henley-on-Thames
Career Highlights
Some highlights of Beatrice Lillies career
Label
Beatrice lillie
Alternative names
Lillie, Beatrice Gladys
Birth name
Beatrice Gladys Lillie
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Beatrice Lillie
News
News abour Beatrice Lillie from around the web
Vintage film comedies spotlighted in three-day festival - The Union Leader
Google News - over 5 years
UNH-Manchester third floor auditorium, 400 Commercial St. Stage icon Beatrice Lillie, in her only silent film role, stars as a traveling theater troupe's worst actress who dreams of all she could be if she only had the right opportunities
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Google News article
Vuelta al mundo en puro aire - Diario El Mundo de Córdoba (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
... los clásicos “duros” Peter Lorre y George Raft, el torero Luis Miguel Dominguín --ya sabe, el papi de Miguel Bosé-- y el bailarín de flamenco José Greco, los comediantes clásicos Buster Keaton, Joe E. Brown y la maravillosa Beatrice Lillie
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Google News article
Death, Jenny Lee Beekman - York News-Times
Google News - over 5 years
Survivors include her daughter, Michelle Beekman of McCool Junction; brother and sister-in-law, Robert and Patty Whittenburge of Dallas, Texas; sisters and brothers-in-law, Elsie Otto of Beatrice, Lillie and Larry Thornton of Wood River and Bessie and
Article Link:
Google News article
Today in Music History - May 29 - mysask.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
In 1894, comedienne and singer Beatrice Lillie was born in Toronto. She moved to England at the age of 16, and later became a star in London's West End and on Broadway. Lillie began recording as early as 1915, and was still making records in the 1950's
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Google News article
Inside the royal suite where the Obamas will stay during their visit to ... - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
In the early days of the Queen's reign, one of the guests was the actress Beatrice Lillie (Lady Peel). After a nervous footman spilled gravy on her brand new Paris gown, she came up with what is regarded at the Palace as the best one-liner ever heard:
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Google News article
A rambunctous medium conjures up the spirit of a mischevious 'Blithe Spirit' - NorthJersey.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Mildred Natwick, Beatrice Lillie, Margaret Rutherford, Geraldine Page, Ruth Gordon, Lauren Bacall and Angela Lansbury have all portrayed Madame Arcati; Clifton Webb, Rex Harrison, Richard Chamberlain and Noel Coward have appeared as Charles;
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Google News article
Edward Woodward, 79, Star of Spy Series
NYTimes - about 7 years
Edward Woodward, a British actor with a long résumé in television and theater who was best known in the United States as the star of ''The Equalizer,'' a dramatic series about an ex-spy turned righteous vigilante in New York City, died on Monday in Truro, Cornwall, England. He was 79 and lived in London and Cornwall. The cause was pneumonia, said
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths CRICHTON, JUDY
NYTimes - about 9 years
CRICHTON--Judy. The Times obit was great. The Emil family added some terrific stuff, and we want to add more. With Henry Guettel as producer, she wrote narrations for Philharmonic Hall concerts devoted to George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hart, Harold Arlen, Noel Coward and Vincent Youmans, featuring such stars as Fred Astaire,
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths DREW, GEORGE W.
NYTimes - over 9 years
DREW--George W. , 80, a member of America's first stage family, died July 8, 2007. A child actor/singer who later attended a Theatre Academy and graduated from Pratt Institute with a degree in fashion design. On Broadway he was in ''Kiss and Tell'' (followed by a USO tour of same in the South Pacific) and ''The Relapse'', transferred from the
Article Link:
NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; Mining A Rich Vein Of Sequins In Revues
NYTimes - over 9 years
Encores! has built its own jukebox, and it gleams like gold. ''Stairway to Paradise,'' which runs through Monday at City Center, is an anthology of truly olden oldies, songs the theatergoing masses heard in musical revues in the first half of the 20th century. And yes, I know, it all sounds too quaint and camp and, well, dusty, for words. But the
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NYTimes article
Music Chronicle
NYTimes - over 10 years
AIN'T GOT NO CIGARETTES: Memories of Music Legend Roger Miller. By Lyle E. Style. (Great Plains Publications, paper, $19.95.) When you've got a name like Lyle E. Style, your only career options are playing point guard for the Kentucky Colonels circa 1973 or chronicling country music, and readers should be grateful that Style has chosen the latter
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; Back Where She Belongs: Carol Channing Reminisces
NYTimes - about 13 years
One singular sensation Ev'ry little step she takes One thrilling combination Ev'ry move that she makes. From ''A Chorus Line'' She walks onto the stage in a silver minidress with sequins the size of quarters and shoes to match. That hair, which could be a cap of feathers or a silky bird's nest, has been blond for years. Now it is a pale silvery
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NYTimes article
Dolores Gray, 78, Sultry Star Of Stage and Movie Musicals
NYTimes - over 14 years
Dolores Gray, a singer and actress whose success on Broadway and London's West End led to starring roles in several 1950's Hollywood musical extravaganzas, died on Wednesday in her Manhattan apartment. She was 78. The cause was a heart attack, her lawyer, Martin D. Newman, said. Tall and sultry, with generous lips, Ms. Gray had a rich contralto
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NYTimes article
THEATER; Bitter and Sweet United: Good Word, Good Theater
NYTimes - over 14 years
WHAT is entertainment? Our tastes are so different that, if challenged, we probably wouldn't mind giving that defiantly smug answer people once gave when asked to define pornography: ''Maybe I can't define it, but I know it when I see it.'' Here's one thing, though: entertainments are out to beguile and win us over; they invite us in and ease our
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; All Right, Everyone: Smile!
NYTimes - over 14 years
IT is tempting to imagine the inspirational advice taped to the dressing room mirrors of the Marquis Theater, where ''Thoroughly Modern Millie'' opened last night -- those encouraging little mantras that help performers give their all. The advice would probably be written in crayon, with the i's, perhaps, dotted with smiley faces. And the words of
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NYTimes article
A Community Sing That Takes You Back
NYTimes - almost 15 years
LAST October, Dana Low of Old Greenwich attended a sing-along event that featured the music of George and Ira Gershwin. Not only did he get to belt out ''I Got Rhythm'' and other Gershwin classics, but he was also treated to anecdotes about the brothers' lives. ''We loved it,'' Mr. Low said of singing a group of songs alongside his wife, Anne, and
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Beatrice Lillie
1894
Born on May 29, 1894.
1914
She began to perform as a child with her mother and sister. She made her West End debut in the 1914 and soon gained notice in revues and light comedies, becoming known for her parodies of old-fashioned, flowery performing styles and absurd songs and sketches.
Eventually, her mother took the girls to London, England where she made her West End début in the 1914 Not Likely.
She was noted primarily for her stage work in revues, especially those staged by André Charlot, and light comedies, and was frequently paired with Gertrude Lawrence, Bert Lahr and Jack Haley.
1920
She was married, on 20 January 1920, at the church of St. Paul, Drayton Bassett, Fazeley, Staffordshire, England, to Sir Robert Peel, 5th Baronet. Following the marriage, she was known in private life as Lady Peel. She eventually separated from her husband, but the couple never divorced. He died in 1934. Their only child, Sir Robert Peel, 6th Baronet, was killed in action aboard in Colombo Harbour, Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka) in 1942.
During World War II, Lillie was an inveterate entertainer of the troops. Before she went on stage one day, she learned her son was killed in action. She refused to postpone the performance saying "I'll cry tomorrow."
1924
She debuted in New York in 1924 and two years later starred in her first film, continuing to perform in both the US and UK.
In her revues, she utilized sketches, songs and parody that won her lavish praise from The New York Times after her 1924 New York début in André Charlot's Revue of 1924, starring Gertrude Lawrence.
In some of her best known bits, she would solemnly parody the flowery performing style of earlier decades, mining such songs as "There are Fairies at the Bottom of our Garden" and "Mother Told Me So" for every double entendre, while other numbers ("Get Yourself a Geisha" and "Snoops the Lawyer", for example) showcased her exquisite sense of the absurd. Her performing in such comedy routines as "One Dozen Double Damask Dinner Napkins", (in which an increasingly flummoxed matron attempts to purchase said napkins) earned her the frequently used sobriquet of "Funniest Woman in the World". She never performed the "Dinner Napkins" routine in Britain, because British audiences had already seen it performed by the Australian-born English revue performer Cicely Courtneidge, for whom it was written.
1926
In 1926 she returned to New York City to perform.
While there, she starred in her first film, Exit Smiling (1927), opposite fellow Canadian Jack Pickford, the younger brother of Mary Pickford. This was followed by The Show of Shows (1929).
1927
After a 1927 tour on the Orpheum Circuit, Lillie made her Broadway Vaudeville debut at the Palace Theatre in 1928 and performed there frequently after that.
1928
She also played at the London Palladium in 1928.
On stage, she was long associated with the works of Noël Coward, beginning with This Year of Grace (1928) and giving the first public performance of "Mad Dogs and Englishmen" in Coward's The Third Little Show (1931). Cole Porter and others also wrote songs for her. From the late 1920s until the approach of World War II, Lillie repeatedly crossed the Atlantic to perform on both continents. With Bobby Clark she appeared in London in Walk a Little Faster, and with Bert Lahr, she starred in New York in The Show is On (1936). Lillie won a Tony Award in 1953 for her revue An Evening With Beatrice Lillie, which she had played both on Broadway and on tour, and she was nominated for another Tony in 1957 for a "golden jubilee edition" of the Ziegfield Follies.
1944
In 1944, Lillie appeared in the film On Approval.
Her few other film appearances included a cameo role as a revivalist in Around the World in 80 Days (1956) and as "Mrs. Meers" (a white slaver) in her last film, Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). After seeing An Evening with Beatrice Lillie, critic Ronald Barker wrote, "Other generations may have their Mistinguett and their Marie Lloyd. We have our Beatrice Lillie and seldom have we seen such a display of perfect talent." Sheridan Morley noted in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography that "Lillie's great talents were the arched eyebrow, the curled lip, the fluttering eyelid, the tilted chin, the ability to suggest, even in apparently innocent material, the possible double entendre".
1948
In 1948, while touring in the show Inside USA, she met singer/actor John Philip Huck, almost three decades younger, who became her friend and companion, and she boosted his career.
As Lillie's mental abilities declined at the end of her career, she relied more and more on Huck, whom her friends viewed with suspicion.
1950
In 1950 she appeared on The Star Spangled Revue with Bob Hope.
This includes the "One Dozen Double Damask Dinner Napkins" sketch.
1960
For her contributions to film, in 1960 Beatrice Lillie was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6404 Hollywood Blvd.
Her portrait, painted by Neysa McMein about 1948 or 1949, is in the collection of The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in England.
1964
She starred in Auntie Mame in both New York (1956–1958) and London (1958), and in 1964 she made her final stage appearance as Madame Arcati in High Spirits, the musical version of Coward's Blithe Spirit, receiving another Tony Award nomination.
1977
In 1977, a conservator was appointed over her property, and she retired to England.
Lillie retired from the stage due to Alzheimer's disease. Julie Andrews remembered that Lillie, as Mrs. Meers in Thoroughly Modern Millie (filmed in 1966 and released in 1967), had to be prompted through her lines and was often confused on set.
1989
Lillie died on January 20, 1989, which was also the date of her wedding anniversary, at Henley-on-Thames.
Huck died of a heart attack 31 hours later and is interred next to her in the Peel family estate's cemetery near Peel Fold, Blackburn. She was the star of three radio programs:
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