Ben Miller
English comedian, actor, and director
Ben Miller
Bennet Evan "Ben" Miller is an English comedian, actor and director. He is perhaps best known as one half of comedy double act Armstrong and Miller, along with Alexander Armstrong. Together the pair wrote and starred in Channel 4 sketch show Armstrong and Miller, and the more recent BBC television sketch show The Armstrong and Miller Show. As of 2011, he is starring in crime drama series Death in Paradise.
Biography
Ben Miller's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Ben Miller from around the web
Texas Diner Tips Waiter $750 So He Can Fly Home To Ireland
Huffington Post - 3 months
  A total stranger in Texas is being credited with leaving a $750 tip for a waiter from Ireland, a generous gift the waiter says will help fly his new family home to meet his folks. In a Facebook post that’s since gone viral, Taryn Keith, the waiter’s girlfriend, who told The Huffington Post she is expecting a baby in late January, shared a photo of the remarkable triple-digit tip her boyfriend was given on a $122.87 tab. “Hopefully this can get you back to Ireland for the holidays,” reads a handwritten message across the top. Keith’s boyfriend, speaking to ABC News, said the surprising gesture followed a conversation he had with the customer about his home country. “I jokingly said, ‘I wish I could go back that often to see my family,’” Ben Millar, who is from Belfast, told the station. “I thought nothing of it, and we all joked after. The night went on, and I proceeded to give good service and talk to them.” It wasn’t until after the diners left that h ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
This shoe salesman lived an unassuming life. Then he died, and his hometown got quite the surprise
LATimes - 4 months
Ken Millen was born in 1930 and grew up here on North C Street, a neighborhood of treeless blocks along the Wishkah River, which occasionally swallows a chunk of a deteriorating house and carries it away. “Ol’ Ken lived there all his life,” said Lauri Penttila, nodding down the alley toward a blue-and-white...
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LATimes article
When You Weren't Paying Attention Congress Shook Up The Student Loan Market
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Some 42 million Americans could become less likely to fall behind on their student loans -- and get better customer service -- thanks to a new measure the Republican-led Congress forced on the U.S. Department of Education this month. The government's four largest student loan contractors have the worst track record when it comes to preventing late payments. Despite this, the Education Department funnels the bulk of new loans to those four contractors. But 50 words tucked into an 887-page spending bill President Barack Obama signed into law Friday will change that by directing the Education Department to treat its largest and smallest loan contractors equally. The department currently favors its four largest contractors, which include publicly-traded companies such as Navient Corp. and Nelnet Inc., by sending them 74 percent of borrowers who have recently left school and have to begin repaying the government. The department's six smaller contractors fight over the remaining 26 ...
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Huffington Post article
Federal Student Aid Office Calls Failure A Success -- And Hands Out Big Bonuses
Huffington Post - over 1 year
In 1998, the Republican-led Congress and President Bill Clinton's Democratic administration decided to give the U.S. Department of Education's financial aid office more freedom to run the student loan program in exchange for it committing to measurable goals. It may have been a huge mistake. That's the takeaway from a congressional hearing Wednesday that featured blistering criticism from government watchdogs, House Republicans and higher education experts directed at the Office of Federal Student Aid and its chief, James Runcie, for what they described as sloppy oversight of loan contractors and for-profit colleges, inconsistent and poor communication to schools, and an agency culture that chafes at criticism and oversight and seemingly rewards failure. Late payments on student loans have risen in recent years despite generous repayment options, lower joblessness, higher wages and an improving U.S. economy. Federal regulators have found evidence that some of the Federal Stu ...
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Huffington Post article
Arne Duncan's Plan To Fix College Accreditation
Huffington Post - over 1 year
When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. The Obama administration on Friday made public its long-awaited recommendations to reform what many experts contend is the broken system of college accreditation -- the self-regulatory collection of private groups paid by schools to evaluate whether the institutions meet the necessary standards to continue receiving a nearly free flow of taxpayer money. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Thursday described accreditors as "watchdogs that don't bite" -- though he has the power to correct that by stripping them of their authority. His package of reforms largely amounts to injecting much-needed transparency into a historically opaque system, directing his staff to do a better job, and asking Congress for more power. "We have been clear and dire ...
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Huffington Post article
Arne Duncan's Plan To Fix College Accreditation
Huffington Post - over 1 year
When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. The Obama administration on Friday made public its long-awaited recommendations to reform what many experts contend is the broken system of college accreditation -- the self-regulatory collection of private groups paid by schools to evaluate whether the institutions meet the necessary standards to continue receiving a nearly free flow of taxpayer money. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Thursday described accreditors as "watchdogs that don't bite" -- though he has the power to correct that by stripping them of their authority. His package of reforms largely amounts to injecting much-needed transparency into a historically opaque system, directing his staff to do a better job, and asking Congress for more power. "We have been clear and dire ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Who Keeps Billions Of Taxpayer Dollars Flowing To For-Profit Colleges? These Guys
Huffington Post - over 1 year
For-profit universities have had another rough year, with big players facing federal scrutiny for everything from predatory loans to outright fraud. Now attention is turning to the schools’ accreditors. Accreditors are supposed to make sure that schools provide students with a quality education. They are not government agencies, but wield enormous power: Schools need accreditors’ stamps of approval to maintain access to the government’s annual $170 billion in federal student aid. Losing accreditation would be fatal for most for-profit schools since they rely on federal aid for much of their income. But accreditors rarely crack down, even when students are struggling. One of the areas where students at for-profits face extra burden is debt: While only one-tenth of college students attend for-profit schools, they account for nearly half of all students’ defaults. What role are accreditors playing? Using recently released federal data, ProPublica analyzed how students are fa ...
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Huffington Post article
Who Keeps Billions Of Taxpayer Dollars Flowing To For-Profit Colleges? These Guys
Huffington Post - over 1 year
For-profit universities have had another rough year, with big players facing federal scrutiny for everything from predatory loans to outright fraud. Now attention is turning to the schools’ accreditors. Accreditors are supposed to make sure that schools provide students with a quality education. They are not government agencies, but wield enormous power: Schools need accreditors’ stamps of approval to maintain access to the government’s annual $170 billion in federal student aid. Losing accreditation would be fatal for most for-profit schools since they rely on federal aid for much of their income. But accreditors rarely crack down, even when students are struggling. One of the areas where students at for-profits face extra burden is debt: While only one-tenth of college students attend for-profit schools, they account for nearly half of all students’ defaults. What role are accreditors playing? Using recently released federal data, ProPublica analyzed how students are fa ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Shady Schools, Serious Debt
NYTimes - almost 2 years
The for-profit Corinthian Colleges filed for bankruptcy after investigations into possible recruiting fraud led the Department of Education to suspend its access to federal student aid. Thousands of former students are asking the government to forgive their loans, arguing that the school used predatory practices to persuade them to borrow money. Other for-profit colleges have been accused of similar practices. Loan relief for students could cost taxpayers millions of dollars, and establish a precedent for other students unhappy with their college degree. Who deserves debt forgiveness when for-profit colleges close or are accused of fraud? Responses: Insufficient Protections at the Department of Education Ben Miller, New America Foundation Forgiving Loans Would Be a Mistake Richard Vedder, Center for College Affordability and Productivity For-Profit College Student Debt Sh ...
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NYTimes article
How For-Profit Colleges Stay In Business Despite Terrible Track Record
Huffington Post - over 3 years
By every available indication, Corinthian Colleges Inc., one of the country's largest chains of for-profit colleges, stands out as an institution whose students face especially long odds of success. At nearly half of Corinthian's schools, more than 30 percent of students default on their federal loans within three years of leaving campus, according to the most recent federal data. California last year cited excessively high default rates in denying access to state tuition grants at 23 of the company's campuses. Over the last three years, attorneys general in eight states and the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau have probed Corinthian's recruitment claims and financial aid practices, raising the prospect of lawsuits. Yet by the reckoning of the accrediting bodies that are supposed to scrutinize Corinthian's 97 U.S. campuses, its schools are meeting standards on student debt and adequately preparing graduates for jobs. Over the past decade, Corinthian's schools have remain ...
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Huffington Post article
New signings off the mark as Reserves win at Kelso
Berwick Advertiser - over 3 years
KELSO UNITED 1, BERWICK RANGERS RES 4 Recent signings Greig Tulloch and Conor Scott scored their first goals as Berwick Rangers Reserves eased to victory in sunny Kelso. Kelso’s Bruce Chisholm with a shot and Berwick’s Lewis Turner with a header weren’t far off target before Berwick scored in the 17th minute. A crossfield move involving Shaun Meikle, Stephen Anderson and Jordan Davidson ended with Scott sweeping the ball into the net. Ross Brady’s 38th minute corner was headed out straight to Jonny Fairbairn who promptly headed it back for goal number two. Rangers’ third goal came eight minutes into the second half. Elliot Turnbull pushed away Ben Miller’s free kick but Davidson sent the ball back towards goal where Chris Black headed past his own keeper. Kelso soon pulled back a goal. Berwick keeper Lyle Sloan got two touches of the bobbing ball produced by Darren Bowie’s boomer of a free kick from almost on the halfway line. United striker Des Burnett went one better and i ...
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Berwick Advertiser article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ben Miller
    FORTIES
  • 2016
    Age 49
    Miller played the role of Murray in the six-part BBC sitcom I Want My Wife Back, starring alongside Caroline Catz. In 2016, he will appear in Channel 4 comedy Power Monkeys.
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    In February 2016 Miller issued a book, accompanied by a lecture tour, entitled The Aliens are Coming!, examining the question "are we alone in the universe?
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    In 2016, Miller co-presented the ITV entertainment series It's Not Rocket Science alongside Rachel Riley and Romesh Ranganathan.
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  • 2015
    Age 48
    In 2015, following the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, Miller starred as King John in Series 6 of Horrible Histories.
    More Details Hide Details Since October 2015, Miller along with Ruth Jones and Will Close, appears in adverts for British supermarket Tesco as Roger with Jones as his wife Jo and Close as their son Freddie.
  • 2014
    Age 47
    On 6 September 2014, Miller guest starred in Doctor Who as the Sheriff of Nottingham in the third episode: "Robot of Sherwood".
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    In 2014, Miller appeared in a feature film version of Molly Moon.
    More Details Hide Details He also appeared with Billy Connolly and David Tennant in the film What We Did on Our Holiday. Starring opposite Nancy Carroll and Diana Vickers, Miller played Robert Houston in the play The Duck House by Dan Patterson and Colin Swash. The show is a political satire based on the UK parliamentary expenses scandal.
  • 2013
    Age 46
    Filming began in March 2013, and Miller left in May after completion of the first episode, in which his character was murdered.
    More Details Hide Details Miller explained he had personal reasons for the change. "It was the job of a lifetime, but logistically I just didn't feel I could continue." He went on to say that "My personal circumstances just made it too complicated, but I will miss it like a lung. I love it here." Miller's wife had discovered she was pregnant after he had begun filming the first series. Their time apart caused strains on their relationship, and with his sons. He wanted to spend more time with his family.
    On 9 April 2013 it was announced that Miller would be departing the series, to be replaced by actor Kris Marshall.
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    In 2013, Miller took part in an episode of Room 101 and a Comic Relief special of game show Pointless.
    More Details Hide Details On 13 December 2014, he appeared in a Christmas edition of The Celebrity Chase. From 2011 until the series three premiere in 2014, Miller starred in the BBC-French co-produced series Death in Paradise as Detective Inspector (DI) Richard Poole. A third series of Death in Paradise was commissioned for early 2014.
  • 2012
    Age 45
    On 23 July 2012, Miller began touring for his book, It's Not Rocket Science, from the Royal Society in London.
    More Details Hide Details He also appeared at the British Comedy Awards with Armstrong on Channel 4.
  • 2011
    Age 44
    From November 2011, he played the role of Louis Harvey in The Ladykillers at the Gielgud Theatre.
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    In 2011, he reprised his role as James Lester in the TV series Primeval.
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    In January 2011, he presented an episode of the BBC science series Horizon titled "What is One Degree?
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  • 2010
    Age 43
    In 2010, he made his directorial debut with the film Huge.
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  • 2008
    Age 41
    Miller provided the voice for the ITV Digital and now PG Tips Monkey in a popular series of television advertisements featuring Johnny Vegas. In 2008, he appeared as television producer Jonathan Pope in Tony Jordan's series Moving Wallpaper on ITV1 and starred in Thank God You're Here.
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  • 2007
    Age 40
    He starred as James Lester in ITV's 2007 sci-fi drama Primeval and as Mr Jonathan in the Australian film Razzle Dazzle: A Journey into Dance.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 2006
    Age 39
    The pair, who have a son Jackson, known as Sonny, born in 2006, divorced in 2011.
    More Details Hide Details Miller has another son, Harrison, born in late 2011 and a daughter born in June 2015, with his second wife production executive Jessica Parker, daughter of British musician Alan Parker, whom he married in September 2013. On 20 February 2009, Miller appeared with Rob Brydon in an episode of QI (Series 6. 9). Brydon has often been mistaken for Miller, and as a joke they dressed in similar shirts for the episode and shared an on-screen narcissistic kiss. A talented musician, Miller plays the guitar and drums.
    In 2006 he took part in a three-part Christmas special, The Worst Christmas of My Life.
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  • 2004
    Age 37
    In 2004 and 2005, he starred in two series of the BBC television series The Worst Week of My Life, with Sarah Alexander.
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    In 2004 he co-starred in The Prince and Me.
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  • 2003
    Age 36
    In 2003 he played the role of 'Bough', sidekick to Rowan Atkinson's title character, in the film Johnny English.
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  • 1997
    Age 30
    Their success resulted in the commission of the television series Armstrong and Miller, which ran for four series from 1997 to 2001 – one on the Paramount Comedy Channel and three on Channel 4.
    More Details Hide Details In 1998, the duo also had their own radio show with the same name on BBC Radio 4, which featured many of the sketches and characters from their TV series. After a six-year break, the show was recommissioned for Hattrick Productions as The Armstrong and Miller Show and is in its third series. In 2008, they also had a second radio show, Children's Hour with Armstrong and Miller. Miller also started acting in films, starring in Steve Coogan's first feature film, The Parole Officer (2001).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1992
    Age 25
    Miller moved to London to pursue a career in comedy. He was introduced to fellow Cambridge graduate Alexander Armstrong in 1992, at the TBA Sketch Comedy Group, a comedy club which ran at the Gate Theatre Studio, Notting Hill throughout the 1990s.
    More Details Hide Details They performed their first full-length show together at the Edinburgh Fringe in 1994 and returned in 1996, when they were nominated for the Perrier Comedy Award.
  • 1989
    Age 22
    Having already finished his undergraduate degree, he joined the Footlights in 1989, working with Andy Parsons, David Wolstencroft and Sue Perkins, and went on to direct a revue.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1966
    Born
    Born on February 24, 1966.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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