Benito Juárez
President of Mexico
Benito Juárez
Benito Juárez born Benito Pablo Juárez García, was a Mexican lawyer and politician of Zapotec origin from Oaxaca who served five terms as president of Mexico: 1858–1861 as interim, then 1861–1865, 1865–1867, 1867–1871 and 1871–1872. He resisted the French occupation of Mexico, overthrew the Second Mexican Empire, restored the Republic, and used liberal efforts to modernize the country.
Biography
Benito Juárez's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Benito Juárez
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Benito Juárez
Show More Show Less
News
News abour Benito Juárez from around the web
Officials Announced For Garcia-Fuentes 8/27 Title Fight - BoxingScene.com
Google News - over 5 years
Jose Maria Zavala has been assigned as the third man for the bout, which takes place at the Auditorio Benito Juarez in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. The three judges are Alejandro Lopez-Cid, Victor Salomon and Alfredo Polanco
Article Link:
Google News article
NO HBO? Solis-Oliva take spotlight - fightnews.com
Google News - over 5 years
In the main event IBF 108lb champion Ulises “Archie” Solis (33-2-3, 21 KOs) is set to defend his world title against Filipino Jether Oliva (18-0-1, 11 KOs) at the Benito Juárez Auditorium on Saturday night in his native Guadalajara
Article Link:
Google News article
Mexican village 'liberated' - St. George Daily Spectrum
Google News - over 5 years
The story of Florencia de Benito Juarez illustrates this well. Last year, the hyper-violent "Zetas" drug gang basically occupied Florencia. They chased out or bought out the cops and operated openly in the mountain town of 4000. They intimidated people
Article Link:
Google News article
Archie Solis Would Love a Brian Viloria Revenge Bout - BoxingScene.com
Google News - over 5 years
The fight takes place at the Auditorio Benito Juarez, promoted by Zanfer and TV Azteca will televise. Solis would like to get a revenge bout with WBO champion Brian Viloria, who stopped the Mexican boxer in the eleventh round of their 2009 clash
Article Link:
Google News article
Mexico: Avocado price exceeds salary - FreshPlaza
Google News - over 5 years
In the Food Market Benito Juárez the price per kilo for avocado is 45 pesos, in the local market Damián Carmona it is 55 and in convenience stores and the product goes up to 60.90. With a minimum wage of 57 pesos in the region corresponding to zone C,
Article Link:
Google News article
Archie Solis, Raul Garcia Doubleheader on 8/27 in Mexico - BoxingScene.com
Google News - over 5 years
The main event will feature Ulises "Archie" Solis making the first defense of his IBF junior flyweight title at the at the Auditorium "Benito Juarez." The event will be televised by TV Azteca. Solis (33-2-3, 21 KOs) will face Argentina's Eduardo Adrian
Article Link:
Google News article
What does Pilsen say about the DREAM Act? - RedEye Chicago (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Quinn even signed the law here in Pilsen, at Benito Juarez High School. RedEye caught up with some neighbors to hear their thoughts: Trujillo first realized the importance of the DREAM Act when she witnessed the pain of an ex-boyfriend of hers at
Article Link:
Google News article
Quinn Signs DREAM Act Into Law - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Quinn signed the legislation at Chicago's Benito Juarez Community Academy in the presence of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel along with other elected officials as well as civic, religious and academic leaders. “All children have the right to a first-class ... - -
Article Link:
Google News article
Mexican schools opening U.S. branches as violence pushes many northward - Bellingham Herald
Google News - over 5 years
The two cities even shared the same name, Paso del Norte, until 1888, when Juarez was named after revered President Benito Juarez. But today there is a sharp divide. El Paso, where the Hispanic population is more than 80 percent, is one of the safest
Article Link:
Google News article
March in Solidarity with Cuba Organized in Mexico - Ahora.cu
Google News - over 5 years
Under the slogan “Yes, it's possible to build a fairer world,” demonstrators will walk on July 26 from the chamber to Benito Juarez, in the historic area of Mexico City, to the US embassy, according to a communique issued by the organizers,
Article Link:
Google News article
3 restaurants, 3 years and £3 at Benito's Hat! - Easier (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
And, in honour of the colourful hat–wearing Benito Juarez (the most loved of all Mexican leaders and the first indigenous national to serve as President), after whom the restaurants are named, any customer wearing a hat will receive a spot prize!
Article Link:
Google News article
CHICAGO NEWS COOPERATIVE; Expanding Hispanic Students' Academic Horizons
NYTimes - over 5 years
Amalia Lopez transferred to Tamayo Elementary charter school last year from a neighborhood school, where she says no one talked to her about high school options. It was assumed, said Amalia, 14, that she would attend her neighborhood high school. Fortunately for her, Tamayo had a ''graduate support'' program that informed her of application and
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Expanding Hispanic Students' Academic Horizons - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Mr. Rangel said the graduate-support program was created to give students other options besides Thomas Kelly High School and Benito Juarez Community Academy, their neighborhood high schools. Chicago Public Schools last week named Juarez one of eight
Article Link:
Google News article
The Caravan for Peace - La Voz Nueva
Google News - over 5 years
We're walking from the Lerdo Bridge to the Plaza Benito Juárez, more or less 200-300 people, a mix of Americans who have come over from El Paso and citizens of Ciudad Juárez. Leading us is a little pickup truck with a bell in it,
Article Link:
Google News article
South Campus police station gets its 1st complaint - Hindustan Times
Google News - over 5 years
However, the predominantly women staff of officers posted at the modest South Campus police post on the notorious Benito Juarez Marg weren't the only ones who took Ram Lagan Mishra's visit with a pinch of salt. “He was quite taken aback, actually
Article Link:
Google News article
Sister cities unite for peace - The Prospector
Google News - over 5 years
UTEP students joined artists, writers, community members and victims of the drug violence in Ciudad Juárez as they rallied for peace and justice June 10 and 11 at the Benito Juárez monument and San Jacinto Plaza in El Paso. "This is important for our
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Benito Juárez
    OTHER
  • 1872
    Juárez died of a heart attack on July 18, 1872 while reading a newspaper at his desk in the National Palace in Mexico City.
    More Details Hide Details He was succeeded by Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada, his foreign minister. Today Benito Juárez is remembered as being a progressive reformer dedicated to democracy, equal rights for his nation's indigenous peoples, his antipathy toward organized religion, especially the Catholic Church (motivated by his adherence to Freemasonry), and what he regarded as defense of national sovereignty. The period of his leadership is known in Mexican history as La Reforma del Norte (The Reform of the North), and constituted a liberal political and social revolution with major institutional consequences: the expropriation of church lands, the subordination of the army to civilian control, liquidation of peasant communal land holdings, the separation of church and state in public affairs, and also the almost-complete disenfranchisement of bishops, priests, nuns and lay brothers, codified in the "Juárez Law" or "Ley Juárez". La Reforma represented the triumph of Mexico's liberal, federalist, anti-clerical, and pro-capitalist forces over the conservative, centralist, corporatist, and theocratic elements that sought to reconstitute a locally-run version of the old colonial system. It replaced a semi-feudal social system with a more market-driven one, but following Juárez's death, the lack of adequate democratic and institutional stability soon led to a return to centralized autocracy and economic exploitation under the regime of Porfirio Díaz. The Porfiriato (Porfirist era), in turn, collapsed at the beginning of the Mexican Revolution.
  • 1871
    Amid fraud charges and widespread controversy, he was re-elected for a new term in 1871.
    More Details Hide Details During his last two terms, he used the office of the presidency to ensure electoral success, obtain personal gains and suppress revolts by opponents, such as Porfirio Díaz.
  • 1867
    Juárez had no intention to leave power following the end of the French invasion. He won in a relatively clean manner the 1867 election and immediately requested and obtained special powers from Congress to rule by decree.
    More Details Hide Details Despite being forbidden to do so by the 1857 constitution, Juárez once again ran for re-election in 1871.
    Despite national and international pleas for amnesty, Juárez refused to commute the sentence, and Maximilian was executed by firing squad on 19 June 1867 at Cerro de las Campanas in Querétaro.
    More Details Hide Details His last words had been "¡Viva México!" His body was returned to Austria for burial.
  • 1866
    On 7 February 1866, Juárez was elected as a companion of the 3rd class of the Pennsylvania Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS).
    More Details Hide Details While membership in MOLLUS was normally limited to Union officers who had served during the American Civil War and their descendants, members of the 3rd Class were civilians who had made a significant contribution to the Union war effort. Juárez is one of the very few non-United States citizens to be a MOLLUS companion. In Washington, D.C., there is a monument by Enrique Alciati, a gift to the US from Mexico. Juárez has been mentioned or featured in television and film. Juarez is a 1939 American historical drama film directed by William Dieterle, and starring Paul Muni as Juárez. In January 1959, the episode entitled "The Desperadoes" of the ABC/Warner Brothers western television series, Sugarfoot, starring Will Hutchins in the title role, focuses upon an imaginary plot to assassinate Juárez. Set at a mission in South Texas, the episode features Anthony George as a Catholic priest, Father John, a friend of the series character Tom "Sugarfoot" Brewster.
    Following the end of the war, US President Andrew Johnson demanded the French evacuate Mexico and imposed a naval blockade in February 1866.
    More Details Hide Details When Johnson could get no support in Congress, he allegedly had the Army "lose" some supplies (including rifles) "near" (across) the border with Mexico, according to U.S. General Philip Sheridan's journal account. Faced with US opposition to a French presence and a growing threat on the European mainland from Prussia, French troops began pulling out of Mexico in late 1866. Maximilian's liberal views cost him support from Mexican conservatives as well. In 1867, the last of the Emperor's forces were defeated and Maximilian was sentenced to death by a military court (a retaliation for Maximilian's earlier orders for the execution of republican soldiers).
  • 1865
    Before Juárez fled, Congress granted him an emergency extension of his presidency, which would go into effect in 1865, when his term expired, and last until 1867, when the last of Maximilian's forces were defeated.
    More Details Hide Details In response to the French invasion and the elevation of Maximilian, Juárez sent General Plácido Vega y Daza to California to gather Mexican American sympathy for Mexico's plight. Maximilian offered Juárez amnesty and later even the post of prime minister, but Juárez refused to accept a government "imposed by foreigners" or a monarchy. The government of the United States was sympathetic to Juárez, refusing to recognize Maximilian and opposing the French invasion as a violation of the Monroe Doctrine, but it was distracted by the American Civil War.
  • 1863
    The French advanced again in 1863, forcing Juárez and his elected government to flee Mexico City once again, first to San Luis Potosí, then to the arid northern city of El Paso del Norte, present day Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, and finally to the capital of the state, Chihuahua City, where he set up his cabinet and government-in-exile.
    More Details Hide Details There, he would remain for the next two and a half years. Meanwhile, Maximilian von Habsburg, a younger brother of the Emperor of Austria, was proclaimed Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico on 20 April 1864 with the backing of Napoleon III and a group of Mexican conservatives.
  • 1861
    In March 1861, Juárez was finally elected President in his own right under the Constitution of 1857.
    More Details Hide Details However, the Liberals' celebrations of 1861 were short-lived. The war had severely damaged Mexico's infrastructure and crippled its economy. While the Conservatives had been defeated, they would not disappear, and the Juárez government had to respond to pressures from these factions. He was forced to give an amnesty to captured Conservative guerrillas still resisting the Juárez government even though they were executing captured Liberals, which included Melchor Ocampo. In view of the government's desperate financial straits, Juárez cancelled repayments of interest on foreign loans. Spain, Britain and France, angry over unpaid Mexican debts, sent a joint expeditionary force that seized the Veracruz Customs House in December 1861. Spain and Britain soon withdrew after they realized that the French Emperor Napoleon III intended to overthrow the Juárez government and establish a Second Mexican Empire, with the support of the remnants of the Conservative side in the Reform War. Thus began the French intervention in Mexico in 1862.
  • 1860
    Nevertheless, the aid received enabled the liberals to overcome the conservatives' initial military advantage; Juárez's government successfully defended Veracruz from assault twice during 1860 and recaptured Mexico City on 1 January 1861.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1858
    Juárez was thus acknowledged as president by liberals on 15 January 1858 and assumed leadership of the Liberal side of the civil war known as the Reform War (Guerra de Reforma).
    More Details Hide Details As Zuloaga's hoes were in control of Mexico City, Juárez and his government fled, first to Querétaro and later to Veracruz, whose customs revenues were used to fund the government's expenditure. The Conservatives were supported by the Catholic Church (in 1859, during the war, Juárez ordered the confiscation of church properties) and the regular army, but the Liberals had the support of several state governments in the north and central-west and the administration of US President James Buchanan. A treaty between the two governments, the McLane-Ocampo Treaty was signed in December 1859, although Buchanan was unable to secure ratification of the treaty by the US Congress.
    The actions did not go far enough for the rebels, and on 11 January 1858, Zuloaga demanded Comonfort's resignation. Comonfort then re-established the Congress, liberated all prisoners and then resigned as President. The conservative forces proclaimed Zuloaga as President on 21 January. Meanwhile, under the terms of the 1857 Constitution, the President of the Supreme Court of Justice became interim President of Mexico until a new election could be held.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1857
    A new liberal constitution, the Constitution of 1857, was promulgated, under which Juárez became President of the Supreme Court of Justice, under moderado (moderate) president Ignacio Comonfort.
    More Details Hide Details Conservatives led by General Félix María Zuloaga, with the backing of the military and the clergy, launched a revolt under the Plan of Tacubaya on 17 December 1857. Comonfort sought to placate the rebels by appointing several conservatives to the Cabinet, dissolving the Congress, and implementing most of the Tacubaya Plan. Juárez, Ignacio Olvera, and many other deputies and ministers were arrested.
  • 1855
    The Ley Juárez (Juárez Law) of 1855 declared all citizens equal before the law and severely restricted the privileges of the Catholic Church.
    More Details Hide Details
    Faced with growing discontent, Santa Anna resigned in 1855 and Juárez returned to Mexico.
    More Details Hide Details The winning party, the liberales (Liberals), formed a provisional government under General Juan Álvarez, inaugurating the period known as La Reforma. The Reform laws sponsored by the puro (pure) wing of the Liberal Party curtailed the power of the Catholic Church and the military, while trying to create a modern civil society and capitalist economy based on the model of the United States.
  • 1854
    In 1854, he helped draft the Plan of Ayutla, a document calling for Santa Anna's deposition and a convention to implement a new constitution.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1853
    This, as well as his objections to the corrupt military dictatorship of Santa Anna, led to his exile in 1853.
    More Details Hide Details He spent his exile in New Orleans, Louisiana, working in a cigar factory.
  • 1847
    He was governor of the state of Oaxaca from 1847 to 1852.
    More Details Hide Details During his tenure as governor, he supported the war effort against the Americans in the Mexican War, but seeing the war was lost, he refused Antonio López de Santa Anna's request to regroup and raise new forces.
  • 1843
    In 1843, Benito married Margarita Maza, the daughter of his sister's patron.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1834
    Juárez became a lawyer in 1834 and a judge in 1841.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1806
    Juárez was born on 21 March 1806, in a small adobe house in the village of San Pablo Guelatao, Oaxaca, located in the mountain range now known as the "Sierra Juárez".
    More Details Hide Details His parents, Brígida García and Marcelino Juárez, were Zapotec peasants and died of complications of diabetes when he was three years old. Shortly afterward, his grandparents died as well, so after that his uncle raised him. He described his parents as "indios de la raza primitiva del país," that is, "Indians of the original race of the country." He worked in the cornfields and as a shepherd until the age of 12, when he walked to the city of Oaxaca to attend school. At the time, he could speak only Zapotec. In the city, where his sister worked as a cook, he took a job as a domestic servant for Antonio Maza. A lay Franciscan, Antonio Salanueva, was impressed with young Benito's intelligence and thirst for learning, and arranged for his placement at the city's seminary.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)