Bert Lahr
Actor, vaudevillian
Bert Lahr
Bert Lahr was an American actor and comedian. Lahr is remembered today for his roles as the Cowardly Lion and Kansas farmworker Zeke in the film The Wizard of Oz (1939), but was also well known for work in burlesque, vaudeville, and on Broadway.
Biography
Bert Lahr's personal information overview.
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Stroll down the Yellow Brick Road - Mississauga
Google News - over 5 years
Based on the 1900 fairy tale novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum, the film, made in 1939, stars Judy Garland as Dorothy, Ray Bolger as Scarecrow, Jack Haley as the Tin Man and Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Lion. Margaret Hamilton also takes
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Judy Garland play to come to Broadway - USA Today
Google News - over 5 years
The 'Wizard of Oz' cast: Jack Haley as the Tin Woodman , leftm Judy Garland as Dorothy, Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow and Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Lion. The 'Wizard of Oz' cast: Jack Haley as the Tin Woodman , leftm Judy Garland as Dorothy,
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Orpheum's Summer Movie Series Continues with CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF and WIZARD ... - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
Along the way, she meets the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), the Tin Man (Jack Haley) and the Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr), who help her fend off the Wicked Witch of the West (Margaret Hamilton). Fans are invited to come downtown for dinner and movie at The
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Local production of 'The Wizard of Oz' begins Thursday - Cedartown Standard
Google News - over 5 years
Rounding out the main roles in the cast will be Kate Saxton as the Wicked Witch of the West, Matt Kelley as the Wizard, and Will Lundy as the Cowardly Lion, who said he is using Bert Lahr's performance from the1939 film version as a model for the
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The almanac - UPI.com
Google News - over 5 years
They include social reformer Lucy Stone in 1818; sharpshooter Annie Oakley in 1860; Scottish inventor John Baird, a pioneer in television technology, in 1888; actors Bert Lahr in 1895, Regis Toomey in 1898 and Charles "Buddy" Rogers in 1904;
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Muni to close season with 'Wizard of Oz' - The State Journal-Register
Google News - over 5 years
He plays the Cowardly Lion, the role played by Bert Lahr in the film. “You take what he did, and you try to expand on it, make it your own,” Gordon said. “I agree with Josh — you don't want to go in an entirely different direction, because the people
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Annisquam troupe tackles 'Annie Get Your Gun' - Gloucester Daily Times
Google News - over 5 years
The last musical in which she performed was with Merman and Bert Lahr, best known for his role as the cowardly lion in Wizard of Oz, in Cole Porter's "DuBarry was a Lady." The children: John Andrew, show biz kid/Indian; Kavika Babson, Indian;
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St. Lucie County: What A Weekend! - TCPalm
Google News - over 5 years
"The Wizard of Oz," the classic 1939 film starring a young Judy Garland as Dorothy, Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow, Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Lion and Jack Haley as the Tim Man, will be shown at 3 pm Sunday. It will be followed at 7 pm by "The Wiz," a
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John Davidson drawing crowds on Sundays at the Atlantis Country Club - Palm Beach Post
Google News - over 5 years
Two months after graduation he'd landed his first Broadway part in Foxy as the son of Bert Lahr (The Wizard of Oz's Cowardly Lion.) “I thought I just wanted to do Broadway shows,” he says, and was playing Curly in a revival of Oklahoma when he was
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Playhouse Celebrates 80th Birthday - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
On Tuesday morning Artistic Director Mark Lamos and Managing Director Michael Ross saluted the 80 th birthday of the venerable Playhouse that drew legendary talents of stage and screen — Ethel Barrymore, Helen Hayes, Paul Robeson and Bert Lahr,
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Jo-Wilfried Tsonga v Roger Federer - as it happened - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Nerves always play a part but Tsonga is more Bert Lahr than king of the jungle out there. He moves to 30-0 with a little luck but then can't get his feet moving when Federert pings one deep to his right and he tamely hits it into the net
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These old musicals will have you singing along - Ocala
Google News - over 5 years
She has the three best companions a girl could want in the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), the Tin Man (Jack Haley) and the Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr). This movie continues to stand the test of time. And you need only see it again to be reminded why that is. 2
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Big bucks for movie memorabilia - The National
Google News - over 5 years
In 2006, the "Cowardly Lion" costume worn by a the actor Bert Lahr in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz sold for $805000. It was made from real lion pelts, weighed more than 50 pounds and Lahr once remarked that performing in it was like "working inside a
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CdA Theatre's 'Oz' is true to the fun - The Spokesman Review (subscription)
Google News - over 5 years
Welch, whose day job is the producing artistic director of the theater, did an amazing job of channeling Bert Lahr, complete with blustery baritone and big cowardly sniffles. The Travolta sisters get to play two of the best roles in the show – Ellen
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The 'Wonderful Wizard of Oz' at Sanibel School - Sanibel Captiva Islander
Google News - over 5 years
Casey Wexler was incredibly funny, she seemed to channel Bert Lahr's 1939 version of the movie's cowardly Lion complete with Lahr's New Yawk accent. Her rendition of "If I Only Had the Nerve" (pronounced noive), rightfully stopped the show
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Dennis Miller: Anthony Weiner Is a 'Nasty Piece of Work' - Fox News
Google News - over 5 years
I guarantee you he'll run down the hallway of the House of Representatives and dive out the window at the end of the hall like Bert Lahr after the Wizard of Oz scared him. He'll be going down that reflecting pool in a race with Usain Bolt,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Bert Lahr
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1967
    Age 71
    In Notes on a Cowardly Lion: The Biography of Bert Lahr, John Lahr wrote: "Bert Lahr died in the early morning of December 4, 1967.
    More Details Hide Details Two weeks before, he had returned home at 2 a.m., chilled and feverish, from the damp studio where The Night They Raided Minsky's was being filmed. Ordinarily, a man of his age and reputation would not have had to perform that late into the night, but he had waived that proviso in his contract because of his trust in the producer and his need to work. The newspapers reported the cause of death as pneumonia; but he succumbed to cancer, a disease he feared but never knew he had." While the official cause of death was listed as pneumonia, it was later revealed that Lahr, unknown to all, had had cancer for some time. Most of Lahr's scenes had already been shot. Norman Lear told the New York Times that "through judicious editing we will be able to shoot the rest of the film so that his wonderful performance will remain intact." The producers used test footage of Lahr, plus an uncredited voice double and a body double, burlesque actor Joey Faye, to complete Lahr's role.
  • 1964
    Age 68
    In 1964 he won the Tony Award for Best Leading Actor in a Musical for his role in the musical Foxy.
    More Details Hide Details At the American Shakespeare Festival he played Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream (1960), for which he received the Best Shakespearean Actor of the Year Award. "Laughter is never too far away from tears," he reflected on his comedy. "You will cry at a pedlar much easier than you would cry at a woman dressed in ermine who had just lost her whole family." Lahr's later life was troubled. His first wife, Mercedes Delpino, developed mental health problems that left her hospitalized. This complicated his relationship with his second wife, Mildred Schroeder, as he had legal problems with getting a divorce in New York State. She grew tired of waiting and became involved with another man and married him. Lahr was heartbroken but eventually won her back.
  • 1963
    Age 67
    In 1963, he appeared as Go-Go Garrity in the episode "Is Mr. Martian Coming Back" on NBC's medical drama The Eleventh Hour.
    More Details Hide Details Among his numerous Broadway roles, Lahr starred as Skid in the Broadway revival of Burlesque from 1946 to 1948 and played multiple roles, including Queen Victoria, in the original Broadway musical Two on the Aisle from 1951 to 1952. In the late 1950s, he supplied the voice of a bloodhound in "Old Whiff," a short cartoon produced by Mike Todd which featured the olfactory Smell-O-Vision process developed for Todd's feature film Scent of Mystery (1960).
  • 1959
    Age 63
    In 1959, he played Mr. O'Malley in an adaptation of Barnaby for General Electric Theater.
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  • 1956
    Age 60
    He co-starred in the premiere of Waiting for Godot in 1956 at the Coconut Grove Playhouse in Miami, Florida, playing Estragon to Tom Ewell's Vladimir.
    More Details Hide Details The performance bombed, with audience members walking out in large numbers, and the critics did not treat it kindly. In his book Notes on a Cowardly Lion, John Lahr (Bert's son) states that the problems were caused partly by the choices of the director, including the decision to limit Bert's movement on stage; filling the stage with platforms; and a misguided description of the play as a light comedy, along with other difficulties. Lahr reprised his role in a short-lived Broadway run. This time, with a new director, Herbert Berghof, who had met with Beckett in Europe and discussed the play. The set was cleared and Bert was allowed more freedom in his performance. Advertisements were taken out urging intellectuals to support the play. It was a success and received enthusiastic ovations from the audience. Bert was praised and though he claimed he did not understand the play, others would disagree and say he understood it a great deal.
  • FORTIES
  • 1938
    Age 42
    Lahr was signed to play the role on July 25, 1938.
    More Details Hide Details He starred opposite Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Frank Morgan, and Margaret Hamilton. Lahr's lion costume was composed of lion fur and, under the high-intensity lighting required for Oz's Technicolor scenes, the costume was unbearably hot. Lahr contributed ad-lib comedic lines for his character. Many of Lahr's scenes took several takes because other cast members, especially Garland, couldn't complete the scenes without laughing. The Cowardly Lion is the only character who sings two solo song numbers-"If I Only Had the Nerve", performed after the initial meeting with Dorothy, The Scarecrow, and The Tin Man in the forest, and "If I Were King of the Forest", performed while he and the others are awaiting their audience with the Wizard. "The Wizard of Oz" was Lahr's 17th movie but his first success. When warned that Hollywood had a habit of typecasting actors, Lahr replied, "Yeah, but how many parts are there for lions?"
  • THIRTIES
  • 1931
    Age 35
    Lahr made his feature film debut in 1931's Flying High, playing the oddball aviator he had played on stage.
    More Details Hide Details He signed with New York-based Educational Pictures for a series of two-reel comedies. When that series ended, he went to Hollywood to work in feature films. Aside from The Wizard of Oz (1939), his movie career was limited. In the 1944 patriotic film Meet the People, Lahr uttered the phrase "Heavens to Murgatroyd!" later popularized by cartoon character Snagglepuss. Lahr's most famous role was that of the Cowardly Lion in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's 1939 adaptation of The Wizard of Oz.
  • 1927
    Age 31
    In 1927 he debuted on Broadway in Delmar's Revels.
    More Details Hide Details He played to packed houses, performing classic routines such as "The Song of the Woodman" (which he reprised in the film Merry-Go-Round of 1938). Lahr had his first major success in a stage musical playing the prize fighter hero of Hold Everything! (1928–29). Other musicals followed, notably Flying High (1930), Florenz Ziegfeld's Hot-Cha! (1932) and The Show is On (1936) in which he co-starred with Beatrice Lillie. In 1939, he co-starred as Louis Blore alongside Ethel Merman in the Broadway production of DuBarry Was a Lady.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1895
    Born
    Born on August 13, 1895.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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