Betty Furness
American actress, consumer advocate and current affairs commentator, Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs under President Lyndon B. Johnson
Betty Furness
Elizabeth Mary Furness was an American actress, consumer advocate and current affairs commentator.
Biography
Betty Furness's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Betty Furness
News
News abour Betty Furness from around the web
Home sweet electric home - Charlotte Observer
Google News - over 5 years
In the late 1950s, several celebrities including Ronald Reagan (when he was an actor) and Betty Furness promoted all-electric homes. Micah was able to find old commercials featuring Ronald Regan and his family in their all-electric home
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Google News article
U.S. consumer group to honor Kanjorski - Wilkes Barre Times-Leader
Google News - over 5 years
Humberto Cruz, with the Betty Furness Consumer Media Service Award. The Consumer Federation of America is an association of 300 nonprofit organizations that was established in 1968 to advance the consumer interest through research, advocacy and
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Google News article
The Unappreciated Secret(s) of Banking Success - Banktech (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
I can't tell if their moms were thinking Betty Grable, Bette Davis, Betty Furness or Betty Boop, but one thing is for sure. It's the Bettys of the banking industry that have kept it afloat. And no one is inclined to give them any credit
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Georgetown House Tour attracts hundreds - The Georgetown Dish
Google News - almost 6 years
(Photo by: The Georgetown Dish) Eleanor Eilenberg recalls actress Betty Furness, who famously opened a refrigerator door in 1950s TV commercials for Westinghouse. Later, the celebration continued in a hospitality suite hosted by The Georgetowner
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Google News article
在信用卡知多D - 解放牛网 (博客)
Google News - almost 6 years
但是,“他们同时也寄给了那些失业者、醉汉、瘾君子及负债者,这个过程被约翰逊总统的特别助理Betty Furness 描述为"给糖尿病患者提供糖"。”这种疯狂的邮寄行为在银行术语里成为“狂寄”,1970年因导致金融秩序混乱被叫停
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The Ham that Multiplies - Patch.com
Google News - almost 6 years
In her absence, my source for recipes and cooking techniques and tips became a cookbook that my father had given my mother called "The Betty Furness Westinghouse Cook Book," by Betty Furness and Julia Keane, published by Simon and Shuster in 1954
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The Ernie Kovacs Collection - DVD Talk
Google News - almost 6 years
Edie has a funny live moment when the mop breaks during her commercial parody (perhaps spoofing Betty Furness, complete in full-scale ball gown and white gloves?), before Ernie shows again his fascination with the medium's technology by having a
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Google News article
URBAN STUDIES | OVERHEARING; Where the Walls Have Big Ears
NYTimes - over 8 years
IN a city as big and complicated as New York, many buildings have their shares of urban legends, tales of ghosts walking, lurking in the service elevators or haunting the storage areas. Imagine what life must be like in the Dakota on West 72nd Street near Central Park, where fiction (''Rosemary's Baby'' was filmed there) merged with
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MEDIA: ADVERTISING; Annual Meeting Embraces Lucy and Ethel and Does a Little Gecko-Bashing
NYTimes - over 11 years
HERE is a look back at some of the highlights, lowlights and sidelights of the 95th annual meeting of the Association of National Advertisers, attended by more than 900 people here last Thursday through Sunday. BROUGHT TO YOU BY -- One topic discussed by many speakers during the conference was branded entertainment, the integration of products and
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Travels With George And Carville
NYTimes - over 13 years
WITH all due respect to ''National Lampoon's Animal House'' and Brian De Palma's ''Scarface,'' the American movie in most pressing need of an anniversary resuscitation on DVD is ''The War Room.'' It was 10 years ago this fall that James Carville and George Stephanopoulos got their big-screen break in the D. A. Pennebaker-Chris Hegedus documentary
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Leslie Midgley, 87, Prolific TV News Producer
NYTimes - over 14 years
Leslie Midgley, a newspaperman who overcame his skepticism about television and became producer of 1,500 programs for CBS News, including coverage of the Kennedy assassination, its aftermath and the fall of Saigon, died yesterday in White Plains. He was 87. The cause was pneumonia, said his daughter, Leslie Rand Midgley. He was admitted to White
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PUBLIC LIVES
NYTimes - over 17 years
A Former Chief Out of the Shadow New York City had a Commissioner of Consumer Affairs before BESS MYERSON, whom MAYOR JOHN V. LINDSAY appointed in 1969. But one would not have known that from looking at the photographs of former commissioners at the agency's headquarters at 42 Broadway. Miss Myerson's was always the first. Until now. A
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Edward T. Parrack, 84, Ex-Head of Ketchum Advertising Agency
NYTimes - about 18 years
Edward T. Parrack, an advertising executive who supervised some of the best-known campaigns in the early years of television, died Jan. 13 at his home in Oakland in western Pennsylvania. He was 84. As an account executive of Ketchum MacLeod & Grove, an international advertising and public relations agency based in Pittsburgh, he helped organize the
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THE OTHER DOLE -- A special report.;Elizabeth Dole Is Eager To Keep Strength Subtle
NYTimes - over 20 years
The men and women running Bob Dole's Presidential campaign are happy to tell people what Elizabeth Dole is not. She is not, they say, Hillary Clinton, and she would not be an unelected policy maker as First Lady. But recent interviews suggest that Mrs. Dole is in fact operating very much like Mrs. Clinton, and that the difference is one of
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ABOUT LONG ISLAND;Meet the Host
NYTimes - about 21 years
THE only thing missing was a marching band. Wedged instrument to instrument outside a cramped 14-by-18-foot television studio were a rock-and-roll band, a classical ensemble, a folk singer and one guitar-strumming aria-to-Allman-Brothers television host. "I fit the Brooklyn Bridge in here once," the host, Carl Bruno, said. Not the span, but another
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THE MEDIA BUSINESS: Advertising; A new ranking of the '50 best' television commercials ever made.
NYTimes - almost 22 years
IF there is something that Madison Avenue welcomes more than a big advertiser embarking on a search for a shop, it is an opportunity to debate the merits of the work that agencies have created through the decades. So, a list of the "50 best" commercials since television began will stir passionate discussion. The list was compiled by the editors of
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NYTimes article
Vox Pop Video: A Public Access TV Guide
NYTimes - over 22 years
FORGET diamonds. When it comes to public-access television, Fast Forward is a girl's best friend. I admit I went a little overboard. In my zeal to immerse myself in the First Amendment, to revel in the joy and the right of my fellow New Yorkers to instruct me and perchance, entertain, I taped 30 hours of programming. I had the cozy notion that
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Mourning in Sitcomville
NYTimes - over 22 years
It is a sad day in Sitcomville. To say this is not to belittle the human loss that her real-life family is experiencing at the death of Harriet Nelson in California this week. For Mrs. Nelson, her husband, Ozzie, and their sons, David and Ricky, were also inhabitants of a mythic electronic community. It seemed vaguely Californian. People wore
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NYTimes article
Betty Furness, 78, TV Reporter And Consumer Advocate, Dies
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Betty Furness, who went from minor acting roles to reknown as a television saleswoman and then became a formidable consumer advocate, died on Saturday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan. She was 78 and lived in New York City and Hartsdale, N.Y. The cause was stomach cancer, said her husband, Leslie Midgley. With the cheekbones
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Betty Furness
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1994
    Age 78
    Furness expressed her philosophy of never declining a job, and she believed it was the reason that she progressed through such an unconventional series of professions. During her illness, she stated that she wanted nothing more than to be able to work, and (consumer reporter to the end) once mentioned in an interview that, as far as her cancer went, "the treatment is worse than the disease," but her health continued to deteriorate until her death in New York from stomach cancer in 1994.
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  • 1992
    Age 76
    She continued working for The Today Show until she was released from her contract in 1992.
    More Details Hide Details Her dismissal was widely publicized and controversial and was viewed by many of Furness' supporters as ageism.
  • 1990
    Age 74
    In 1990 Furness was diagnosed with cancer.
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  • 1977
    Age 61
    In 1977 her program Buyline: Betty Furness won the Peabody Award.
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  • 1976
    Age 60
    Signed by WNBC in New York, Furness reported on consumer issues, and specifically targeted examples of consumer fraud. In 1976 she began an association with The Today Show filling in as anchor following the departure of Barbara Walters and providing regular reports.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1973
    Age 57
    In 1973 she also headed the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs.
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  • 1970
    Age 54
    She was appointed by then-Governor of New York Nelson Rockefeller in August 1970 to serve as the first chairman and executive director of the New York State Consumer Protection Board, and served in the position until July 1971 before returning to television.
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  • 1969
    Age 53
    From 1969 until 1993 she served as a board member for Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports.
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    She accepted the assignment and continued in this role until the end of the Johnson administration in 1969.
    More Details Hide Details During her tenure she silenced her critics by applying herself studiously to her role and learning the issues relating to consumer rights.
  • 1967
    Age 51
    She married again in 1967 to Leslie Midgley, who survived her.
    More Details Hide Details Her granddaughter is Liza Snyder, from the CBS Television series Yes, Dear.
    In 1967 President Lyndon B. Johnson, aware of her work for the Democrats, contacted Furness and offered her the position of Special Assistant for Consumer Affairs.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1960
    Age 44
    Her final spots for Westinghouse were seen within the CBS News coverage of the July 1960 Los Angeles Democratic Convention, the August 1960 Chicago Republican Convention and the evening of November 8th election returns.
    More Details Hide Details She then attempted to move into a less commercialized role in television, but found herself too closely associated with advertising to be taken seriously. During this time, she worked on radio and also on behalf of the Democratic Party. Furness has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, for her contribution to motion pictures and to television.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1953
    Age 37
    In 1953 she appeared in her own daytime television series Meet Betty Furness, which was sponsored by Westinghouse; she remained a spokesperson for the company until 1960.
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  • 1951
    Age 35
    She appeared in a series of live mysteries on ABC, under the weighty title Your Kaiser Dealer Presents Kaiser-Frazer "Adventures In Mystery" Starring Betty Furness In "Byline" which ran in November and December 1951, and again on ABC in syndication in the fall of 1957.
    More Details Hide Details The series was produced by the DuMont Television Network and ran on DuMont under the title News Gal.
    Furness was a regular panelist on the CBS panel show What's My Line? in 1951.
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  • 1950
    Age 34
    Her second marriage to him lasted until his death in 1950.
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    Furness hosted ABC's Penthouse Party which ran for 39 episodes from September 1950 to June 1951.
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  • 1948
    Age 32
    In 1948 Furness was performing in the television series Studio One, which was broadcast live.
    More Details Hide Details She filled in for an actor to promote Westinghouse products during the advertisement break, and impressed the company with her easy and professional manner. They offered her a contract to promote their products and she subsequently became closely associated with them. One of television's most recognizable series of commercials had Furness opening wide a refrigerator door, intoning, "You can be sure... if it's Westinghouse." (The spots were so well known they were often parodied: one Mad magazine gag imagined the words on a neon sign, with a few key letters burned out: YOU CAN.. SU.E IF IT'S WESTINGHOUSE!") Ironically, Furness may be best known today for a Westinghouse commercial in which she did not appear: during a live spot, a refrigerator door failed to open, creating one of the most infamous bloopers in TV history. This actually did not happen to Furness, as has often been claimed, but to another actress (June Graham), who was substituting for her.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1943
    Age 27
    After her divorce from Green in 1943, she married radio announcer Hugh "Bud" Ernst Jr. twice; first in 1945, and again in 1946.
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  • 1937
    Age 21
    Furness married four times. Her first marriage was to composer-conductor Johnny Green in 1937 with whom she had one child.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1932
    Age 16
    Furness made her stage debut in the school holidays in the title role of Alice in Wonderland. She also posed for commercial advertising. She began her professional career as a model before being noticed by a talent scout and being signed to a film contract in 1932 by RKO Studios.
    More Details Hide Details Her first film role was as the "Thirteenth Woman" in the film Thirteen Women (1932) but her scenes were deleted before the film's release. Over the next few years she appeared in several RKO films, and became a popular actress. Among her film successes were Magnificent Obsession (1935) and the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers film Swing Time (1936). By the end of the decade she had appeared in over forty films, but during the 1940s found it difficult to secure acting roles.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1916
    Age 0
    Born on January 3, 1916.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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