Betty Grable
dancer, singer, actress
Betty Grable
Elizabeth Ruth "Betty" Grable was an American actress, dancer, and singer. Grable was celebrated for having the most beautiful legs in Hollywood and studio publicity widely dispersed photos featuring them. Her iconic bathing suit poster made her the number-one pin-up girl of the World War II era. It was later included in the LIFE magazine project "100 Photos that Changed the World".
Biography
Betty Grable's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of Betty Grable
News
News abour Betty Grable from around the web
Unique Tin car extravaganza will roll into town Friday - Longview Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
Contestants for the annual Unique Tin Pin-up contest are encouraged to do their best imitation of Betty Grable and Marilyn Monroe. Participants in the Saturday contest, which awards $300 to the first-place winner, can register from 9 am to 2:45 pm The
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Composer, owner of local supper club dies - The Desert Sun
Google News - over 5 years
In the 1960s and '70s, he directed and co-wrote material for artists as diverse as Jimmy Durante, Betty Grable, opera diva Helen Traubel and film legend Mae West, who performed a “muscle man” act with special material co-written by Moody
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PS MAGAZINE: A love affair with the fifties - Parramatta Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Betty Grable – the world's number one pin-up girl. Her photograph lined the locker rooms of GI soldiers as they prepared for battle in World War II. The iconic image was later recognised by LIFE magazine as one of the top 100 photographs that changed
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Things to do this weekend - Daily Breeze
Google News - over 5 years
Moon Over Miami: 1941 musical romance starring Betty Grable, Don Ameche and Robert Cummings, 8:15 pm today, 2:30 and 8:15 pm Saturday, 2:30 pm Sunday, Old Town Music Hall, 140 Richmond St., El Segundo; tickets $8; 310-322-2592,
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Perspective: Permanent Waves - Adweek
Google News - over 5 years
Colgate-Palmolive's money men must have lunched with every studio from MGM to Paramount, inking deals until its roster of “regular users” included (and this is the short list) Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Betty Grable, Ava Gardner, Maureen O'Hara,
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Tod Booth to Star in the Alhambra's Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Opens 8/10 - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
The Alhambra was the place of Betty Grable's final acting role. The Alhambra is also home to former Miss America, Orange Park native Leanza Cornett who started at the Alhambra when she was 15. In November 2009, the Alhambra was purchased by Theatre
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Swimming on location in Geyserville - Santa Rosa Press Democrat (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Could that be Betty Grable or Cary Grant on the neighboring lounge chair? On weekends there may be live music serenading from a band pavilion while you splash and sunbathe. It's so lovely it's almost unreal. Coppola has kindly made this not just an
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Mary Kenny: From 'Dallas' to debt -- American dream fades as money runs out - Irish Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall and Betty Grable in a scene from 'How to Marry a Millionaire', a film that epitomised the American dream. PHOTOS FROM 4 Surely one of the most dramatic changes we have seen in recent times has been the image of America,
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What's On Sunday
NYTimes - over 5 years
NOON (Fox Movie) NIAGARA (1953) Marilyn Monroe and Niagara Falls are both shining stars of this dramatic thriller. Honeymooners Polly (Jean Peters) and Ray Cutler (Casey Adams) arrive at their cottage by the falls to find that Rose (Monroe) and George Loomis (Joseph Cotten, above with Monroe) have not yet checked out. The Cutlers take temporary
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Not That Kind Of Nose Job
NYTimes - over 5 years
EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. IT is a truism that summer traffic in the Hamptons is insane. But the sight here two weeks ago of an old F-101 Voodoo fighter jet making its way slowly along Main Street might have set a new standard for motorized spectacle. Only the front third of the aircraft was present, and it wasn't moving under its own propulsion. (It sat
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Rare WWII-era bombers coming to Bellingham's Heritage Flight Museum - TheNewsTribune.com
Google News - over 5 years
The image of Betty Grable, a War World II era pin-up girl, painted on the side of the B-17G "Sentimental Journey" at the Heritage Flight Museum in Bellingham on Saturday morning, August 15, 2009. The "Sentimental Journey" was manufactured in November
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Jennifer Aniston honored at Grauman's [video] - Hot Momma Celebrity Gossip
Google News - over 5 years
The sidewalk outside Grauman's Chinese Theatre boasts the hand-prints of some of Hollywood's greatest names – Betty Grable, Elizabeth Taylor, Charlie Chaplin and others. And yesterday they let Jennifer Aniston play there as well. ... -
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Morning Report: Education Watchdog Gets Debarked - Voice of San Diego
Google News - over 5 years
Frederica Sagor Maas, a longtime Hollywood screenwriter in both the silent and talkie eras — she put words into the mouths of stars like Clara "The It Girl" Bow, Betty Grable and Greta Garbo — had an 111th birthday in La Mesa yesterday
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'Toddlers and Tiaras,' Indians game on tap tonight - New Philadelphia Times Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Tonight, you can tune in at 8 pm for the 1942 musical “Springtime in the Rockies” starring Betty Grable, John Payne and the one and only Carmen Miranda. Grable and Payne play Vicky Lane and Dan Christy, a Broadway musical team who split due to Dan's
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Retro Bikinis: Baring It All On The Beach Is So Out! - Worldcrunch
Google News - over 5 years
MILAN - The retro trend that in the past two seasons has influenced lingerie – “guepieres” and corsets a la Betty Grable included – is now invading beaches. Whether she's on a yacht or a posh island, the 2011 fashionista is likely to
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Embrace Your Inner Betty Grable; Rhonda Shear's Modern Take on the Pin-Up Classic - PR Web (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Featuring fifteen fresh colors and classy, classic prints fit for a modern day Betty Grable, this Today's Special is really special. Now the everyday woman can embody the iconic sexy glamour of the classic 'Pin-Up Girl' with Rhonda Shear Intimates'
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Betty Grable
    FIFTIES
  • 1973
    Age 56
    Grable died of lung cancer at age 56 in Los Angeles, California, on July 2, 1973.
    More Details Hide Details Her funeral was held two days later and attended by her ex-husband Harry James and Hollywood stars Dorothy Lamour, Shirley Booth, Mitzi Gaynor, Johnnie Ray, Don Ameche, Cesar Romero, George Raft, Alice Faye, and Dan Dailey. "I Had the Craziest Dream", the ballad from Springtime in the Rockies, was played on the church organ. She was entombed at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood, California, located southwest of Los Angeles. Grable has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6525 Hollywood Boulevard. She also has a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame. She was inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians
  • 1967
    Age 50
    She also appeared on Broadway in "Hello Dolly" in 1967.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1956
    Age 39
    In 1956, she did attempt to return to acting in Samuel Goldwyn's film version of Guys and Dolls.
    More Details Hide Details She opted to play the role of Miss Adelaide, but was passed over in favor of Vivian Blaine, who had played the role on the stage. She thereby officially retired from motion-picture acting. Grable thereafter found a new career starring in her own act in Las Vegas hotels, as well as alongside then husband Harry James. Later, Betty also starred in big Las Vegas stage productions like "Hello Dolly".
  • 1952
    Age 35
    In late 1952, she was scheduled to begin filming The Girl Next Door, a light-weight musical comedy, but when she failed to show up to work, Fox suspended her.
    More Details Hide Details She was eventually replaced by June Haver in the film. After a year off from filming, Grable reluctantly reconciled with Fox and agreed to star in a musical remake of The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953). The film was an attempt by Fox to recapture Grable's heyday as the studio's biggest star, and though she was paired with the popular Dale Robertson, the film was a critical and box-office flop. She next starred in How to Marry a Millionaire, a romantic comedy about three models plotting to marry wealthy men, co-starring Marilyn Monroe and Lauren Bacall. During production, Grable and Monroe were rumored wrongly as not getting along. Grable, whose career was declining, was assumed to be jealous of Monroe because she was being groomed as Fox's newest star and possibly as Grable's unofficial successor. In fact, Grable and Monroe got along famously; Grable reportedly told Monroe: "Go and get yours honey! I've had mine!" How to Marry a Millionaire was a box-office triumph when released, grossing an estimated $8 million.
    In 1952, Grable began renegotiating her contract with Fox.
    More Details Hide Details She requested an upped salary and the option to make only the films she wanted to make. The studio refused to accommodate her requests, and she left the studio on strike. As a result, Grable was replaced by Marilyn Monroe in the movie adaptation of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a role Grable felt perfectly fit her persona.
  • 1950
    Age 33
    In 1950, Grable had regained her status as the most-popular female at the box office; she ranked fourth overall, just behind John Wayne, Bob Hope, and Bing Crosby.
    More Details Hide Details Although, by the early 1950s, Grable was searching for originality in the scripts offered to her, she had no luck in finding the movies she wanted to do. She reluctantly agreed to make Call Me Mister (1951) with Dan Dailey, a loose Technicolor musical remake of A Yank in the R.A.F. The film was only moderately successful, and was quickly followed by Meet Me After the Show (1951), co-starring Macdonald Carey, Rory Calhoun, and Eddie Albert. It received favorable reviews from most critics and was a box-office success.
    Her following film, My Blue Heaven, released in December 1950, reteamed her with Dan Dailey, and was equally successful financially.
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    Wabash Avenue was released in May 1950, and was a box office hit, despite its less-than-favorable critical reviews.
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  • 1949
    Age 32
    In 1949, although she still placed in the top ten, she slipped from second to seventh place in popularity.
    More Details Hide Details Fox became concerned that Grable might gradually be becoming regarded as a movie passé. Darryl F. Zanuck had the film Wabash Avenue tailored to fit Grable's talents. The film's plot line closely followed the story of Grable's earlier hit, Coney Island. Despite the similarities, they had new songs written and dances choreographed to modernize the film.
  • 1948
    Age 31
    In 1948, she was cast in That Lady in Ermine, a film that had previously been considered for either Jeanette MacDonald or Gene Tierney.
    More Details Hide Details It co-starred Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and was originally directed by Ernst Lubitsch. After Lubitsch's death early into production, he was replaced by Otto Preminger. It was widely reported that Grable often quarreled with Fairbanks and Preminger and that she nearly walked out on filming, but decided against on the advice of her agent. When the film was finally released, it received mixed reviews; it was referred to as "a bright and beguiling swatch of nonsense" and it did not generate the revenue for which Fox had hoped. Grable immediately thereafter began filming When My Baby Smiles at Me (1948), co-starring Dan Dailey, which became a blockbuster, cementing Grable and Dailey's status as a bankable movie duo. Closing out the decade, Grable starred in The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend (1949), an oddball movie that unevenly mixed musical numbers with Western clichés. Despite a casting consisting of Cesar Romero and Rudy Vallee, the film was universally panned by critics, but contrary to popular belief, it was a reasonable box-office success.
  • 1947
    Age 30
    Grable next starred in Walter Lang's Mother Wore Tights, released in September 1947, co-starring Dan Dailey.
    More Details Hide Details The film told the story of two aging vaudeville performers as they look back on their heyday through a series of flashbacks. It received critical acclaim from critics and was a box-office hit, earning an estimated $5 million.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1944
    Age 27
    Pin Up Girl co-starred comedians Martha Raye and Joe E. Brown and was released in April 1944 to overwhelming success at the box office.
    More Details Hide Details Critics, though, were not as accepting of the film. Variety said the film "makes no pretenses of ultra-realism", but also called it "very pleasing and pleasant". After time off to give birth to a healthy daughter, Grable returned to Fox to star in Billy Rose's Diamond Horseshoe (1945), co-starring Dick Haymes and Phil Silvers. Though the film earned more than $3 million at the box office, it struggled to make a profit because of its high production costs. The Dolly Sisters (1945), her next film, teamed her with newcomer June Haver, an actress Fox was promoting as Grable's successor. Although the press hinted that a tense behind-the-scenes rivalry existed between the two actresses, they both denied it, claiming to be good friends. The Dolly Sisters earned more than $4 million at the box office, and was Fox's second-highest earning movie of the year, behind Leave Her to Heaven.
  • 1943
    Age 26
    In 1943, she married trumpeter Harry James. The couple had two daughters, Victoria and Jessica. Their marriage, which lasted for 22 years, was rife with alcoholism and infidelity before they divorced in 1965.
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    In 1943, she collaborated with photographer Frank Powolny for a regular studio photo session.
    More Details Hide Details During the shoot, she took several photos in a tight, one-piece bathing suit. One particular pose consisted of Grable's back being to the camera as she playfully smiled looking over her left shoulder. The picture was released as a poster and became the most requested photo for G.I.s stationed overseas. Grable's photograph sold millions of copies, eventually surpassing the popularity of Rita Hayworth's famous 1941 photo. Grable's success as a pin-up girl furthered her career as a mainstream movie star. As her star continued to ascend, Fox chief Darryl F. Zanuck expressed interest in broadening Grable's range as an actress. Zanuck attempted, on multiple occasions, to cast her in films that challenged her acting abilities, but Grable herself was reluctant; she felt insecure about her talent which rendered her unwilling to accept roles she felt required too much of her. Throughout her career, she was very cautious; she often worried about starring opposite well-known leading men, fearing they may squander her success. She preferred to star in up-beat and outlandish musicals, many of which followed the generic boy-meets-girl story tack. In fact, many of her movies were thin when it came to their stories, but they were high on energy during their song-and-dance sequences. Despite their lack of quality, Grable's movies were immensely popular, and Fox regularly channelled the profits it received from Grable's movies into their more prestigious movies.
    Grable's next movie, Coney Island, released in June 1943, was a Technicolor "gay nineties" period musical and co-starred George Montgomery.
    More Details Hide Details The film earned more than $3.5 million at the box office and was well received by critics. Sweet Rosie O'Grady (1943), her follow-up feature, was equally successful at the box office, although it failed to obtain the same critical favoritism.
    Grable was voted the number-one box-office draw by American movie exhibitors in 1943; she outranked Bob Hope, Gary Cooper, Greer Garson, Humphrey Bogart, and Clark Gable in popularity.
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    In 1943, she was the number-one box-office draw in the world and, in 1947, she was the highest-paid entertainer in the United States.
    More Details Hide Details Two of her biggest film successes were the musical Mother Wore Tights (1947) and the comedy How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), one of her last films. Grable retired from screen acting in 1955 after she withdrew from her Fox contract, although she continued to perform on the stage and on television. Throughout her career, Grable was a celebrated sex symbol. Her bathing suit poster made her the number-one pin-up girl of World War II, surpassing Rita Hayworth. It was later included in the Life magazine project "100 Photographs that Changed the World". Hosiery specialists of the era often noted the ideal proportions of her legs as thigh, calf, and ankle. Grable's legs were famously insured by her studio for $1 million as a publicity stunt.
  • 1941
    Age 24
    In 1941, Fox attempted to broaden Grable's acting and audience range by casting her in two films with more serious tones than those in which she had starred previously.
    More Details Hide Details The first, A Yank in the R.A.F., released in September, co-starred heartthrob Tyrone Power, and cast her as Carol Brown, who works in the Women's Auxiliary Air Force during the day, but is employed as a nightclub singer in the evening. The film followed along the lines of other movies of the era, but it was not considered a propaganda movie by the studio. At the time of its release, the film received positive reviews, with many critics singling out the obvious on-screen chemistry between Grable and Power. It was also a major box-office success, becoming the fourth-most popular movie of the year. The second movie, I Wake Up Screaming, released in November, had Grable receiving top billing as Jill Lynn, the sister of a young model who is murdered. The film offered Grable her second teaming with Carole Landis, and it also co-starred Victor Mature. Directed by H. Bruce Humberstone, the movie was a traditional black-and-white film noir, containing a combination of suspense and romance. Grable's performance was favorably reviewed by most critics, and the film enjoyed reasonable financial success. Grable's star continued to rise when she starred in Song of the Islands (1942), co-starring Victor Mature and Jack Oakie. The success of the movie led to her reteaming with Mature in Footlight Serenade (1942), also co-starring John Payne, in which she played a glamorous Broadway star.
  • 1940
    Age 23
    In a 1940 interview, Grable stated she was "sick and tired" of show business and that she was considering retirement.
    More Details Hide Details Soon thereafter, she was offered to go on a personal appearance tour, which she readily accepted. The tour brought Grable to the attention of Darryl F. Zanuck, the head of 20th Century-Fox, who offered her a long-term contract. "If that's not luck, I don't know what you'd call it," Grable said in her first interview after signing with the studio. Zanuck, who had been impressed by Grable's performance in DuBarry was a Lady, was, at the time, in the midst of casting the female lead in the musical film Down Argentine Way. The role had originally been assigned to Alice Faye, Fox's reigning musical star, but she had to decline the part due to an unspecified illness. After reviewing her screen test, Zanuck cast Grable as Faye's replacement in the movie. The film was a lavish Technicolor musical and co-starred Don Ameche and Carmen Miranda. Grable's performance of the song "Down Argentine Way" is considered a highlight of the film.
  • 1939
    Age 22
    In 1939, she appeared opposite her then-husband Jackie Coogan in Million Dollar Legs, a B movie comedy from whose title Grable's famous nickname was taken.
    More Details Hide Details When the film did not become the hit Paramount had hoped for, the studio released her from her contract, and Grable began preparing to leave Hollywood for a simpler life. However, she changed her mind and decided to take her chance on Broadway; she accepted Buddy DeSylva's offer to star in his musical DuBarry Was a Lady with musical-comedy star Ethel Merman. The play was an instant critical and audience success, and Grable was branded a new-found star.
  • 1937
    Age 20
    Grable married former child actor Jackie Coogan in 1937. He was under considerable stress from a lawsuit against his parents over his childhood earnings, and the couple divorced in 1939.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1933
    Age 16
    Over the next few years, however, she was again relegated to uncredited minor roles in a series of films, many of them that became worldwide successes, like the 1933 hit Cavalcade.
    More Details Hide Details She received larger roles in The Gay Divorcee (1934) and Follow the Fleet (1936), two movie musicals starring the immensely popular movie duo of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Late in the 1930s, Grable signed with Paramount Pictures, which lent her to 20th Century-Fox to co-star in the adolescent comedy Pigskin Parade (1936). The film was the studio's effort to introduce Grable to the mainstream movie audience, but her performance was overlooked by audiences and critics in favor of newcomer Judy Garland. When she returned to Paramount, she began a new phase in her career; the studio began casting her in a series of college-aimed movies, the majority of the time having her portray unintelligent blonde co-eds. These films included the moderately popular This Way Please (1937) and College Swing (1938). Though Grable played the leading roles in these films, they led to her being typecast as an innocent and not-so-bright co-ed.
  • 1932
    Age 15
    In 1932, she signed a contract with RKO Radio Pictures, and she was assigned to a succession of acting, singing, and dancing classes at the studio's drama school.
    More Details Hide Details Her first film for the studio, Probation (1932), provided the 14-year-old Grable with her first credited screen role.
  • 1930
    Age 13
    In 1930, at age 13, Grable began a partnership with producer Samuel Goldwyn; she thereby became one of the original Goldwyn Girls, along with Lucille Ball, Virginia Bruce, and Paulette Goddard.
    More Details Hide Details As a member of the ensemble group of attractive young starlets, Grable appeared in a series of small parts in movies, among them the mega-hit Whoopee! (1930), starring Eddie Cantor. Although she received no on-screen credit for her performance, she led the film's opening musical number, entitled "Cowboys".
  • 1929
    Age 12
    A 12-year-old Grable and her mother traveled to Hollywood in 1929, shortly after the infamous stock market crash, hoping to achieve stardom.
    More Details Hide Details To get her daughter jobs, Lillian Grable lied about her daughter's age, claiming she was 15 to movie producers and casting agents. The same year, after assuming the stage name "Betty Grable", she made her film debut in Happy Days (1929). This eventually led to her having small roles in Let's Go Places (1930) and a short Movietone commercial reel for 20th Century-Fox.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1916
    Born
    Betty Grable was born Elizabeth Ruth Grable on December 18, 1916, in St. Louis, Missouri.
    More Details Hide Details She was the youngest of three children born to Lillian Rose (née Hofmann; 1889 - 1964) and John Charles Grable (1883 - 1954), a stockbroker. She had Dutch, Irish, German, and English ancestry. Nicknamed "Betty" as a child, the young girl was pressured by her mother, a stubborn and materialistic woman, to become a performer. She was entered in multiple beauty contests, many of which she won or for which achieved considerable attention. Despite her success, she suffered from demophobia, the fear of crowds, and was a sleepwalker.
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