Profile

Bob Costas

Male
Born Mar 22, 1952
Age 64
Hometown New York, New York
Height 5' 7" (170 cm)
Nationality American
Alma Mater Syracuse University
High School Commack South Hig...
Other Names Robert Quinlan Co...

Robert Quinlan "Bob" Costas is an American sportscaster, on the air for NBC Sports television since the early 1980s. He has been prime-time host of a record 9 Olympic games.

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CHILDHOOD

1952 Birth Born on March 22, 1952.

TWENTIES

1974 22 Years Old From there, at 22, he went to KMOX, calling play-by-play for the Spirits of St. Louis of the American Basketball Association in 1974. … Read More
1976 24 Years Old He was also employed by CBS Sports as a regional CBS NFL and CBS NBA announcer from 1976 to 1979, after which he moved to NBC. … Read More

THIRTIES

1983 - 1988 3 More Events
1989 37 Years Old Besides calling the 1989 American League Championship Series for NBC, Costas also filled-in for a suddenly ill Vin Scully, who had come down with laryngitis, for Game 2 of the 1989 National League Championship Series. … Read More
1990 38 Years Old When NBC gained the NBA network contract from CBS in 1990, Costas hosted the telecasts and was teamed in the studio with ex-Lakers coach Pat Riley.
1991 39 Years Old He also hosted the studio program Showtime and did play-by-play for the 1991 All-Star Game.

FORTIES

1997 45 Years Old In 1997 Costas began a three-year stint as the lead play-by-play man for The NBA on NBC. … Read More
2000 48 Years Old NBC enlisted Costas' services after they were forced to (temporarily) remove Marv Albert from their broadcasts due to lingering personal and legal problems at the time. Costas stepped aside following the 2000 NBA Finals in favor of a returning Marv Albert.

FIFTIES

2002 50 Years Old 1 More Event
Costas returned to call some games of the 2002 NBA Playoffs after Albert was injured in a car accident two days before the playoffs began. … Read More
2004 52 Years Old 1 More Event
On March 12, 2004, Costas married his second wife, Jill Sutton. … Read More
2005 53 Years Old In June 2005, Costas was named by CNN president Jonathan Klein as a regular substitute anchor for Larry King's Larry King Live for one year. … Read More
2006 54 Years Old In 2006 Costas returned to studio hosting duties on The NFL on NBC (under the Football Night in America banner), which was returning after a near ten-year hiatus. … Read More
2007 55 Years Old On May 26, 2007, Costas discussed the presidency of George W. Bush on his radio show, stating that he liked Bush personally, and had been optimistic about his presidency, but said that the course of the Iraq war, and other mis-steps have led him to conclude that Bush's presidency had "tragically failed" and considered it "overwhelmingly evident, even if you're a conservative Republican, if you're honest about it, this is a failed administration."
2008 56 Years Old 1 More Event
Costas hosted NBC's coverage of the 2008, 2009, and the 2010 NHL Winter Classic. … Read More
In 2009, he hosted Bravo's coverage of the 2009 Kentucky Oaks. … Read More

LATE ADULTHOOD

During a segment on the Sunday Night Football halftime show on December 2, 2012, Costas paraphrased Fox Sports columnist Jason Whitlock in regards to Jovan Belcher's murder-suicide the day prior, stating that the United States' gun culture was causing more domestic disputes to result in death, and that it was likely Belcher and his girlfriend would not have died had he not possessed a gun. … Read More
Costas also delivered the eulogy for Musial after his death in early 2013. … Read More
2014 62 Years Old 1 More Event
An eye infection Costas had at the start of the 2014 Winter Olympics forced him, on February 11, 2014, to cede his Olympic hosting duties to Matt Lauer (four nights) and Meredith Vieira (two nights), the first time someone other than Costas hosted a primetime Olympics broadcast since the 1998 Games (in which Jim Nantz was the primetime host) and the first time Costas has not done so at all since the 1988 Summer Olympics (in which Jim Nantz was the primetime host) and the first time Costas has not done so at all since the 1988 Summer Olympics (Bryant Gumbel was the primetime host for NBC's 1988 Summer Olympics coverage, while Costas hosted the late night portion). … Read More
Original Authors of this text are noted on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Costas.
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