Bob Woodward
Journalist
Bob Woodward
Robert Upshur “Bob” Woodward is an American investigative journalist and non-fiction author. He has worked for The Washington Post since 1971 as a reporter, and is now an associate editor of the Post. While a young reporter for The Washington Post in 1972, Woodward was teamed up with Carl Bernstein; the two did much of the original news reporting on the Watergate scandal.
Biography
Bob Woodward's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Bob Woodward from around the web
Some anti-Trump demonstrators cause destruction
Fox News - about 1 month
Bob Woodward analyses the protests
Article Link:
Fox News article
Watergate reporter: Unverified dossier garbage
CNN - about 1 month
Award-winning journalist Bob Woodward criticizes the Russia dossier that was presented to President-elect Donald Trump.
Article Link:
CNN article
Ari Fleischer's Perfect GOP Vote-Getting Ploy: Slam The 'Biased' News Media
Huffington Post - 3 months
Republican politicians, here is the perfect playbook to winning conservative hearts, penned by Ari Fleischer, who was George W. Bush's press secretary. It's all about media baiting, and he has provided you with best template for it, in an op-ed piece in the Wall Street Journal on Monday. The article is disingenuous as hell, but who cares? Fleischer forecasts "a clash" coming between the new administration and the White House press corps, which he depicts as a smug, entitled bunch of liberal miscreants who are out to get poor Donald Trump. Left unmentioned is Trump's very clear flaws that the public needs to know about. Like his thin-skinned rage toward anyone who doesn't toe his line. Like his sometime bizarre actions. Like his conflicts of interest. How dare the media call him to account? They need to know their place. Shrewdly, Trump understands that there is no more sure-fire way to whip up a GOP crowd than to tar the news media as a clearly identifiable villain. At campai ...
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Huffington Post article
Seeking a Context for "Hillarygate"
Huffington Post - 4 months
In a season of disturbingly ill-informed political dialogue, no topic has left the public with a more distorted understanding of the facts than the one which has taken center stage in the final days of the campaign: the handling of sensitive information by Secretary Clinton during her tenure as Secretary of State. There are five basic questions that need to be addressed to place Secretary Clinton's mistakes in context and determine how to weigh those mistakes in the larger decision of who to support for president. 1. When the word classified material is used, what are we talking about? 2. What are the procedures for those who must deal with classified information to communicate with one another about its meaning for the policies they are responsible for shaping? 3. How often do officials violate the best practices for handling classified material? 4. How significant were the Clinton violations? 5. How has the government responded to significant mistakes in the handling o ...
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Huffington Post article
The Media's Fascination With Sensationalism: New Obamacare Premiums Emphasized, But Not the Subsidies
Huffington Post - 4 months
Watching the news over the last few days I was struck by how the mainstream cable networks, read that to mean CNN and MSNBC, accentuate the provocative, even after giving some attention to the whole story. A case in point, citing recent numbers about how Affordable Care Act premium rates are scheduled to rise, they declare it's in trouble. Though averages are 22%, they emphasized higher examples, such as over 100% for a 27-year old living in Arizona, not mentioning that in Indiana the rates were reduced by 3%. Hardly a balanced story, considering the official report said 77% of Obamacare registrants would be eligible for subsidies, making their premiums about $100 or less a month. 77%. That's over three quarters, folks, and nothing to be ashamed of. In particular, as Obamacare allowed twenty million to get insurance and has greatly reduced uninsured numbers to only 8.6 percent. But with Anderson Cooper and Don Lemon on CNN this was barely mentioned, if at all. Instead, it wa ...
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Huffington Post article
Fox News Just Landed A Brutal, Clean Hit On Hillary Clinton's Campaign
Huffington Post - 4 months
In the beforetime, in the long, long ago of 2015, a woman named Hillary Clinton was about to launch her campaign for president. She was also trying really hard to secure $12 million for her family’s charitable foundation from King Mohammed VI of Morocco. And her campaign was freaking out about it. Campaign manager Robby Mook and longtime Clinton confidant John Podesta thought the deal ― in which Clinton had committed to speak at an event for the king on the condition of his $12 million donation ― would look bad. Clinton aide Huma Abedin tried to explain that it was simply too late to back out. “This was HRC’s idea,” Abedin wrote in an email to Podesta. “Our office approached the Moroccans and they 100 percent believe they are doing this at her request. The King has personally committed approx $12 million both for the endowment and to support the meeting. It will break a lot of china to back out now when we had so many opportunities to do it in the past few months.”  The team ...
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Huffington Post article
Bob Woodward on the final stretch of election 2016
Fox News - 4 months
Will controversy impact the vote?
Article Link:
Fox News article
Has political dishonesty reached its climax?
CBS News - 4 months
Maureen Dowd, Bob Woodward, Jon Meacham and David Ignatius discuss the state of both campaigns, 23 days ahead of the election. What do new wikileaks findings reveal about the inner-workings of the Clinton campaign?
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CBS News article
MSNBC Interrupts Hillary Clinton's Speech To Complain About Her Voice
Huffington Post - 12 months
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Huffington Post article
The Rift Across Europe
Huffington Post - about 1 year
As far as the eye can see the mountains stretches gracefully strewn with ice and snow. The otherwordly scenery is going on forever. The sky is a lucid blue. From up here, almost 7 miles above ground, the world seems wonderfully calm and forever peaceful. But nothing could be farther from the truth. The flight attendant confirms that the landmass below is Turkey. My thoughts wander to the fighting on the ground. How kurdish fighters are battling ISIS in the border regions between Turkey and Iraq. How Turkey's president Erdogan and Russian president Putin is waging a war, so far only with words, over the shoot down of the Russian fighter plane in November last year. How 2.2 million refugees are currently living in Turkish camps, while another 850,000 made the life-threatening journey across the ocean hoping to reach Greece and Northern Europe. When I press the large interactive map embedded in the back of the headrest in front of me, the path on the screen speaks its own l ...
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Huffington Post article
'Spotlight' Celebrates Heroes of Investigative Reporting -- and Democracy
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Long before I ever set foot in an actual, working newsroom, I was a sucker for movies and TV shows about journalism and reporters: the snappy dialogue, the nose for a scoop, the determination to get at the truth and expose the bad guys. I never miss Citizen Kane, All the President's Men or His Girl Friday (the great, screwball remake of that classic play, The Front Page). And when I entered the world of journalism for real, briefly working as a freelance feature writer for a now-deceased, great metropolitan newspaper and then for years in television news and public affairs, I discovered that there really were people in the business as funny, dedicated and talented as the characters on film (some stinkers, too, but that's for my future, sure-to-go-straight-to-remaindered memoir). If you haven't already heard, to the list of superb movies about the trade, you can now add Spotlight. The riveting account of the Boston Globe's investigative team exposing the cover-up of widespread pedo ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
'Spotlight' Celebrates Heroes of Investigative Reporting -- and Democracy
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Long before I ever set foot in an actual, working newsroom, I was a sucker for movies and TV shows about journalism and reporters: the snappy dialogue, the nose for a scoop, the determination to get at the truth and expose the bad guys. I never miss Citizen Kane, All the President's Men or His Girl Friday (the great, screwball remake of that classic play, The Front Page). And when I entered the world of journalism for real, briefly working as a freelance feature writer for a now-deceased, great metropolitan newspaper and then for years in television news and public affairs, I discovered that there really were people in the business as funny, dedicated and talented as the characters on film (some stinkers, too, but that's for my future, sure-to-go-straight-to-remaindered memoir). If you haven't already heard, to the list of superb movies about the trade, you can now add Spotlight. The riveting account of the Boston Globe's investigative team exposing the cover-up of widespread pedo ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
National Press Club Statement On Death of Austin Kiplinger
Yahoo News - about 1 year
"The National Press Club was saddened today to hear the news that Austin Kiplinger, one of our most prominent members and a dear friend of the National Press Club for many years, had passed away at age 97. "In 2005, Mr. Kiplinger received the Club's highest honor, the Fourth Estate Award, given to leading journalists from Walter Cronkite to Bob Woodward. "Many journalists got their start at Kiplinger and made their careers there.
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Bob Woodward
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2014
    Age 70
    In 2014, Robert Gates former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense, said that he wished he'd recruited Woodward into the CIA, saying, "He has an extraordinary ability to get otherwise responsible adults to spill their guts to him his ability to get people to talk about stuff they shouldn't be talking about is just extraordinary and may be unique."
    More Details Hide Details Woodward and Carl Bernstein were both assigned to report on the June 17, 1972, burglary of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in a Washington, D.C., office building called Watergate. Their work, under editor Ben Bradlee, became known for being the first to report on a number of political "dirty tricks" used by the Nixon re-election committee during his campaign for re-election. Their book about the scandal, All the President's Men, became a No. 1 bestseller and was later turned into a movie. The 1976 film, starring Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein, transformed the reporters into celebrities and inspired a wave of interest in investigative journalism.
  • 2013
    Age 69
    On February 22, 2013, shortly before the United States federal budget sequester took effect, The Washington Post published a column by Woodward in which he criticized the Obama administration for their statements in 2012 and 2013 that the sequester had been proposed by Republicans in Congress; Woodward said his research showed that the sequester proposal had originated with the White House.
    More Details Hide Details Press secretary Jay Carney confirmed, "The sequester was something that was discussed, and as has been reported, it was an idea that the White House put forward." On February 27, Woodward told Politico that before the column was published, Woodward had called a senior White House official, later identified by reporters as economic adviser Gene Sperling, to discuss the piece, and that the official had "yelled at Woodward for about a half-hour" before sending him a page-long email that included the sentence, "I think you will regret staking out that claim." In Politicos reporting, Woodward's focus on that line was described as "making clear he saw sentence as a veiled threat", although Woodward did not use the word "threat" or "threatened". Several other sources also indicated that Woodward had expressed the line as an intended threat. The next day, Politico published the complete email exchange between Woodward and Sperling. Sperling's statements leading up to the "regret" line read: "But I do truly believe you should rethink your comment about saying that Potus asking for revenues is moving the goal post. I know you may not believe this, but as a friend, I think you will regret staking out that claim." The White House subsequently released a statement that "of course no threat was intended The note suggested that Mr. Woodward would regret the observation he made regarding the sequester because that observation was inaccurate, nothing more."
  • 2004
    Age 60
    Woodward said the revelation came at the end of a long, confidential background interview for his 2004 book Plan of Attack.
    More Details Hide Details He did not reveal the official's disclosure at the time because it did not strike him as important. Later, he kept it to himself because it came as part of a confidential conversation with a source.
  • FIFTIES
  • 2003
    Age 59
    Woodward apologized to Leonard Downie Jr., editor of The Washington Post, for not informing him earlier of the June 2003 conversation.
    More Details Hide Details Downie accepted the apology and said even had the paper known it would not have changed its reporting. New York University professor Jay Rosen severely criticized Woodward for allegedly being co-opted by the Bush White House and also for not telling the truth about his role in the Plame affair, writing: "Not only is Woodward not in the hunt, but he is slowly turning into the hunted. Part of what remains to be uncovered is how Woodward was played by the Bush team, and what they thought they were doing by leaking to him, as well as what he did with the dubious information he got." Woodward has continued to write books and report stories for The Washington Post, and serves as an associate editor at the paper. He focuses on the presidency, intelligence, and Washington institutions such as the U.S. Supreme Court, The Pentagon, and the Federal Reserve. He also wrote the book Wired, about the Hollywood drug culture and the death of comic John Belushi.
    In his deposition, Woodward also said that he had conversations with Scooter Libby after the June 2003 conversation with his confidential administration source, and testified that it is possible that he might have asked Libby further questions about Joe Wilson's wife before her employment at the CIA and her identity were publicly known.
    More Details Hide Details
    He testified that a senior administration official told him in June 2003 that Iraq war critic Joe Wilson's wife (later identified as Valerie Plame), worked for the CIA as a WMD analyst, not as an undercover operative.
    More Details Hide Details Woodward appears to have been the first reporter to learn about her employment (albeit not her name) from a government source. The deposition was reported in The Washington Post on November 16, 2005, and was the first time Woodward revealed publicly that he had any special knowledge about the case. Woodward testified the information was given to him in a "casual" and "offhand" manner, and said that he does not believe it was part of any coordinated effort to "out" Plame as a CIA employee. Later, Woodward's source identified himself. It was Richard Armitage, Colin Powell's deputy and an internal critic of the Iraq War and the White House inner circle.
  • 2002
    Age 58
    In a series of articles published in January 2002, he and Dan Balz described the events at Camp David in the aftermath of September 11 and discussed the Worldwide Attack Matrix.
    More Details Hide Details Woodward believed the Bush administration's claims of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction prior to the war. During an appearance on Larry King Live, he was asked by a telephone caller, "Suppose we go to war and go into Iraq and there are no weapons of mass destruction", Woodward responded "I think the chance of that happening is about zero. There's just too much there." Woodward later admitted his error saying, "I think I dropped the ball here. I should have pushed much, much harder on the skepticism about the reality of WMD; in other words, should have said, 'Hey, look, the evidence is not as strong as they were claiming.'" In 2008, as a part of the Google Talks series, Woodward, who was interviewed by Google CEO Eric Schmidt, said that he had a fourth book in his Bush at War series in the making. He then added jokingly that his wife told him that she would kill him if he decides to write a fifth in the series.
  • 2001
    Age 57
    He was also the main reporter for the Posts coverage of the September 11 attacks in 2001.
    More Details Hide Details The Post won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for 10 of its stories on the subject. Woodward himself has been a recipient of nearly every major American journalism award, including the Heywood Broun award (1972), Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Reporting (1972 and 1986), Sigma Delta Chi Award (1973), George Polk Award (1972), William Allen White Medal (2000), and the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Reporting on the Presidency (2002). In 2012, Colby College presented Woodward with the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism as well as an honorary doctorate. Woodward has authored or co-authored 18 nonfiction books in the past 35 years. All 18 have been national bestsellers and 12 of them have been No. 1 national nonfiction bestsellers—more No. 1 national nonfiction bestsellers than any contemporary author.
  • 2000
    Age 56
    David Gergen, who had worked in the White House during the Richard Nixon and three subsequent administrations, said in his 2000 memoir, Eyewitness to Power, of Woodward's reporting, "I don't accept everything he writes as gospel—he can get details wrong—but generally, his accounts in both his books and in the Post are remarkably reliable and demand serious attention.
    More Details Hide Details I am convinced he writes only what he believes to be true or has been reliably told to be true. And he is certainly a force for keeping the government honest." Fred Barnes of the Weekly Standard called Woodward "the best pure reporter of his generation, perhaps ever." In 2003, Albert Hunt of The Wall Street Journal called Woodward "the most celebrated journalist of our age." In 2004, Bob Schieffer of CBS News said, "Woodward has established himself as the best reporter of our time. He may be the best reporter of all time."
  • 1995
    Age 51
    In his 1995 memoir, A Good Life, former Post Executive Editor Ben Bradlee singled out Woodward in the foreword. "It would be hard to overestimate the contributions to my newspaper and to my time as editor of that extraordinary reporter, Bob Woodward—surely the best of his generation at investigative reporting, the best I've ever seen.
    More Details Hide Details And Woodward has maintained the same position on top of journalism's ladder ever since Watergate."
  • FORTIES
  • 1989
    Age 45
    In 1989, he married for a third time to Elsa Walsh (b.
    More Details Hide Details August 25, 1957), a writer for The New Yorker and the author of Divided Lives: The Public and Private Struggles of Three American Women. He has two daughters - Taliesin (born 1976) and Diana (born 1996). Woodward maintains a listed number in the Washington, D.C., phone directory.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1976
    Age 32
    Woodward was portrayed by Robert Redford in the 1976 film All the President's Men.
    More Details Hide Details Woodward has co-authored or authored twelve No. 1 national bestselling non-fiction books. They are: Other books, which have also been bestsellers but not No. 1, are Newsweek has excerpted five of Woodward's books in cover stories; 60 Minutes has done segments on five; and three have been made into movies.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1973
    Age 29
    Woodward made crucial contributions to two Pulitzer Prizes won by The Washington Post. First, he and Bernstein were the lead reporters on Watergate and the Post won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 1973.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1971
    Age 27
    After a year at the Montgomery Sentinel, a weekly newspaper in the Washington, D.C., suburbs, Woodward was hired as a Post reporter in 1971.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1970
    Age 26
    After being discharged as a lieutenant in August 1970, Woodward considered attending law school but applied for a job as a reporter for The Washington Post, while taking graduate courses at The George Washington University.
    More Details Hide Details Harry M. Rosenfeld, the Posts metropolitan editor, gave him a two-week trial but did not hire him because of his lack of journalistic experience.
  • 1965
    Age 21
    He received his B.A. degree in 1965, and began a five-year tour of duty in the United States Navy.
    More Details Hide Details At one time, he was close to Admiral Robert O. Welander, being communications officer on the USS Fox under Welander's command.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1943
    Born
    Born on March 26, 1943.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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