Brian De Palma
Film director
Brian De Palma
Brian Russell De Palma is an American film director and screenwriter. In a career spanning over 40 years, he is probably best known for his suspense and crime thriller films, including such box office successes as the horror film Carrie, Dressed to Kill, Scarface, The Untouchables, and Mission: Impossible.
Biography
Brian De Palma's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Brian De Palma from around the web
Ben Affleck And Antoine Fuqua Are No Longer Directing 'The Batman' And 'Scarface,' Respectively
Huffington Post - 21 days
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Two high-profile directors, Ben Affleck and Antoine Fuqua, stepped down from their high-profile reboots on Monday night, one to focus on his acting duties and the other to make a sequel instead. Hollywood roars on!  The first was Affleck, who announced in 2015 his plans to co-write and direct a standalone Batman movie. Then Fuqua said he would be abandoning a reboot of the gangster classic “Scarface.” Technically, Affleck’s vision for “The Batman” ― i ...
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Huffington Post article
2016 presented some gripping documentaries and extraordinary visions
LATimes - about 2 months
Our reviewers weigh in with lists of under-seen movies from 2016, as well as trends they’d like to see more and less of. “De Palma”: Brilliant, oft-misunderstood director Brian De Palma talks to fellow filmmakers Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow about his tumultuous career, going movie by movie in...
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LATimes article
‘Carrie’ Is Back. Like a Bloody Hand From the Grave.
NYTimes - 4 months
Brian De Palma’s “Carrie” (1976) is out on Blu-ray. It may not seem as scary today, but it did help the careers of Mr. De Palma and Stephen King.
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NYTimes article
For Filmmaker Brian De Palma, It All Started With Alfred Hitchcock
NPR - 8 months
NPR's Robert Siegel uses a new documentary about film director Brian De Palma to talk to him about his career highs and lows, techniques, and how deeply he has been influenced by Alfred Hitchcock.
Article Link:
NPR article
Looking back on a career of pulp transcendence with director Brian De Palma
LATimes - 9 months
From his movies — controversial spasms of sex and violence such as “Carrie,” “Blow Out” “Scarface,” “Body Double” and “Femme Fatale” and high-style mainstream entertainments like “The Untouchables” and the first “Mission: Impossible” — one would expect filmmaker Brain De Palma to be stormy and...
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LATimes article
From the mouth of the man himself, 'De Palma' examines a filmmaker's evolutions and obsessions
LATimes - 9 months
Love him or loathe him, and people have regularly done both, there's never been doubt that director Brian De Palma is a filmmaker down to his fingertips. "De Palma," the documentary with his name on it, expertly explores just what that means. The picture’s co-directors, Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow,...
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LATimes article
Movie Review: <i>Dirty Grandpa</i>... Don't Walk Out!
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Oh, my! Why is De Niro working so much and choosing mediocrity like Dirty Grandpa? At times he is wildly funny in a film that has moments of greatness surrounded by banal attempts to get laughs. The beginning of the film is a set up and tedious in its struggle to be outrageous. The concept of an old man wanting to "get laid" and go out with a bang before the bell tolls, is a funny one. But what happened to the execution? The plot is as follows: De Niro's grandson, Zac Efron, is about to marry an uptight socially conscious Julianne Hough. Dick Kelly (De Niro) whose wife just has died, is opposed to the wedding and creates a diversion by asking Jason (Zac Efron) to drive him to Florida to visit an old friend Stinky, (Danny Glover). About twenty minutes into this film, Stinky who is attached to an IV while watching porno films in a nursing home, gives a shot of energy that has been lacking. Glover is wickedly funny and lights up the screen in too small a part. Up to this momen ...
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Huffington Post article
Vilmos Zsigmond, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer, Dead At 85
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond, who won an Oscar for his work on Steven Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," has died. He was 85 years old.  Zsigmond, who was born in Szeged, Hungary, died on New Year's Day, Deadline reported. His business partner and friend Yuri Neyman confirmed the news on Facebook on Sunday afternoon.  Throughout his career, Zsigmond was also nominated for Academy Awards for Michael Cimino's "The Deer Hunter" (1978), Mark Rydell's "The River" (1984) and Brian De Palma's "The Black Dahlia" (2006). He became well-known after working on a group of movies in the 1970s including Robert Altman's "McCabe and Mrs. Miller," "Images" and "The Long Goodbye."  Before becoming one of the most important cinematographers in the industry, Zsigmond worked as a photographer and lab technician in the 1960s. He was first credited as a cinematographer on the 1963 cult film "The Sadist." Through the end of the decade he continued to work on explo ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Vilmos Zsigmond, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer, Dead At 85
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond, who won an Oscar for his work on Steven Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," has died. He was 85 years old.  Zsigmond, who was born in Szeged, Hungary, died on New Year's Day, Deadline reported. His business partner and friend Yuri Neyman confirmed the news on Facebook on Sunday afternoon.  Throughout his career, Zsigmond was also nominated for Academy Awards for Michael Cimino's "The Deer Hunter" (1978), Mark Rydell's "The River" (1984) and Brian De Palma's "The Black Dahlia" (2006). He became well-known after working on a group of movies in the 1970s including Robert Altman's "McCabe and Mrs. Miller," "Images" and "The Long Goodbye."  Before becoming one of the most important cinematographers in the industry, Zsigmond worked as a photographer and lab technician in the 1960s. He was first credited as a cinematographer on the 1963 cult film "The Sadist." Through the end of the decade he continued to work on exploitati ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Brian De Palma
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2015
    Age 74
    In 2015, he was the subject of a documentary film, De Palma.
    More Details Hide Details De Palma's films can fall into two categories, his psychological thrillers (Sisters, Body Double, Obsession, Dressed to Kill, Blow Out, Raising Cain) and his mainly commercial films (Scarface, The Untouchables, Carlito's Way, and Mission: Impossible). He has often produced "De Palma" films one after the other before going on to direct a different genre, but would always return to his familiar territory. Because of the subject matter and graphic violence of some of De Palma's films, such as Dressed to Kill, Scarface and Body Double, they are often at the center of controversy with the Motion Picture Association of America, film critics and the viewing public. De Palma is known for quoting and referencing other directors' work throughout his career. Michelangelo Antonioni's Blowup and Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation plots were used for the basis of Blow Out. The Untouchables finale shoot out in the train station is a clear borrow from the Odessa Steps sequence in Sergei Eisenstein's The Battleship Potemkin. The main plot from Rear Window was used for Body Double, while it also used elements of Vertigo. Vertigo was also the basis for Obsession. Dressed to Kill was a note-for-note homage to Hitchcock's Psycho, including such moments as the surprise death of the lead actress and the exposition scene by the psychiatrist at the end.
  • 2012
    Age 71
    In 2012, his film Passion was selected to compete for the Golden Lion at the 69th Venice International Film Festival.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1991
    Age 50
    He has one daughter from his marriage to Gale Anne Hurd, Lolita de Palma, born in 1991, and one daughter from his marriage to Darnell Gregorio, Piper De Palma, born in 1996.
    More Details Hide Details He resides in Manhattan, New York. De Palma is often cited as a leading member of the New Hollywood generation of film directors, a distinct pedigree who either emerged from film schools or are overtly cine-literate. His contemporaries include Martin Scorsese, Paul Schrader, John Milius, George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, John Carpenter, and Ridley Scott. His artistry in directing and use of cinematography and suspense in several of his films has often been compared to the work of Alfred Hitchcock. Psychologists have been intrigued by De Palma's fascination with pathology, by the aberrant behavior aroused in characters who find themselves manipulated by others. De Palma has encouraged and fostered the filmmaking careers of directors such as Mark Romanek and Keith Gordon. During an interview with De Palma, Tarantino said that Blow Out is one of his all-time favorite films, and that after watching Scarface he knew how to make his own film. Terrence Malick credits seeing De Palma's early films on college campus tours as a validation of independent film, and subsequently switched his attention from philosophy to filmmaking. Other filmmakers influenced by De Palma include Quentin Tarantino, Ronny Yu, Don Mancini, Nacho Vigalondo, and Jack Thomas Smith.
  • FORTIES
  • 1984
    Age 43
    In 1984, he directed the music video of Bruce Springsteen's song "Dancing in the Dark".
    More Details Hide Details The 1980s were denoted by De Palma's other films Dressed To Kill, Blow Out, and Body Double. Later into the 1990s and 2000s, De Palma did other films. He attempted to do dramas and a few thrillers plus science fiction. Some of these movies (Mission: Impossible, Carlito's Way) worked and some others (The Bonfire of the Vanities, Raising Cain, Mission to Mars) failed at the box office. Of these films, The Bonfire of the Vanities would be De Palma's biggest box office disaster, losing millions. Another later movie from De Palma, Redacted, unleashed a controversy over its subject of American involvement in Iraq, and supposed atrocities committed there. It received limited release in the United States and grossed less than $1 million.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1970
    Age 29
    In 1970, De Palma left New York for Hollywood at age thirty to make Get to Know Your Rabbit, starring Orson Welles and Tommy Smothers.
    More Details Hide Details Making the film was a crushing experience for De Palma as Tommy Smothers didn't like a lot of De Palma's ideas. After several small, studio and independent released films that included stand-outs Sisters, Phantom of the Paradise, and Obsession, a small film based on a novel called Carrie was released directed by Brian De Palma. The psychic thriller Carrie is seen by some as De Palma's bid for a blockbuster. In fact, the project was small, underfunded by United Artists, and well under the cultural radar during the early months of production, as Stephen King's source novel had yet to climb the bestseller list. De Palma gravitated toward the project and changed crucial plot elements based upon his own predilections, not the saleability of the novel. The cast was young and relatively new, though the stars Sissy Spacek and John Travolta had gained considerable attention for previous work in, respectively, film and episodic sitcoms. Carrie became a hit, the first genuine box-office success for De Palma. It garnered Spacek and Piper Laurie Oscar nominations for their performances. Preproduction for the film had coincided with the casting process for George Lucas's Star Wars, and many of the actors cast in De Palma's film had been earmarked as contenders for Lucas's movie, and vice versa. The "shock ending" finale is effective even while it upholds horror-film convention, its suspense sequences are buttressed by teen comedy tropes, and its use of split-screen, split-diopter and slow motion shots tell the story visually rather than through dialogue.
  • 1968
    Age 27
    After the success of his 1968 breakthrough, De Palma and his producing partner, Charles Hirsch, were given the opportunity by Sigma 3 to make an unofficial sequel of sorts, initially entitled Son of Greetings, and subsequently released as Hi, Mom!
    More Details Hide Details While "Greetings" accentuated its varied cast, Hi, Mom! focuses on De Niro's character, Jon Rubin, an essential carry-over from the previous film. The film is ultimately significant insofar as it displays the first enunciation of De Palma's style in all its major traits – voyeurism, guilt, and a hyper-consciousness of the medium are all on full display, not just as hallmarks, but built into this formal, material apparatus itself. These traits come to the fore in Hi, Mom!s "Be Black, Baby" sequence. This sequence parodies cinéma vérité, the dominant documentary tradition of the 1960s, while simultaneously providing the audience with a visceral and disturbingly emotional experience. De Palma describes the sequence as a constant invocation of Brechtian distanciation: “First of all, I am interested in the medium of film itself, and I am constantly standing outside and making people aware that they are always watching a film. At the same time I am evolving it. In Hi, Mom! for instance, there is a sequence where you are obviously watching a ridiculous documentary and you are told that and you are aware of it, but it still sucks you in. There is a kind of Brechtian alienation idea here: you are aware of what you are watching at the same time that you are emotionally involved with it.”
  • 1966
    Age 25
    During the 1960s, De Palma began making a living producing documentary films, notably The Responsive Eye, a 1966 movie about The Responsive Eye op-art exhibit curated by William Seitz for Museum of Modern Art in 1965.
    More Details Hide Details In an interview with Gelmis from 1969, De Palma described the film as "very good and very successful. It's distributed by Pathe Contemporary and makes lots of money. I shot it in four hours, with synched sound. I had two other guys shooting people's reactions to the paintings, and the paintings themselves." Dionysus in 69 (1969) was De Palma's other major documentary from this period. The film records The Performance Group's performance of Euripides' The Bacchae, starring, amongst others, De Palma regular William Finley. The play is noted for breaking traditional barriers between performers and audience. The film's most striking quality is its extensive use of the split-screen. De Palma recalls that he was "floored" by this performance upon first sight, and in 1973 recounts how he "began to try and figure out a way to capture it on film. I came up with the idea of split-screen, to be able to show the actual audience involvement, to trace the life of the audience and that of the play as they merge in and out of each other."
  • 1963
    Age 22
    The film, which was co-directed with Leach and producer Cynthia Munroe, had been shot in 1963 but remained unreleased until 1969, when De Palma's star had risen sufficiently within the Greenwich Village filmmaking scene.
    More Details Hide Details De Niro was unknown at the time; the credits mistakenly display his name as "Robert." The film is noteworthy for its invocation of silent film techniques and an insistence on the jump-cut for effect. De Palma followed this with various small films for the NAACP and The Treasury Department.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1940
    Born
    Born in 1940.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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