Broderick Crawford
Actor
Broderick Crawford
Broderick Crawford was an Academy Award-winning American stage, film, radio and TV actor, often cast in tough-guy roles and best known for his starring role in the television series "Highway Patrol."
Biography
Broderick Crawford's personal information overview.
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Immigration Lessons from 'The Golden Girls' - New Republic (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The shocking part is how fresh this episode feels today (despite the references to Broderick Crawford and the overabundance of shoulder pads). Mario's story is the same one that, at last, prompted action from the administration to keep talented youth
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Actores sin cara: 10 intérpretes monstruosos a los que no reconocerías - Revista Cinemania
Google News - over 5 years
Amable y considerado cuando estaba sobrio, se volvía una furia infernal cuando se emborrachaba, generalmente en compañía del galán Broderick Crawford. Antes de morir en 1973, firmó un documento en el que donaba su cuerpo a la ciencia
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Marion resident savors memories of meeting Hollywood stars - Ocala
Google News - over 5 years
In another frame is a card signed by actor Broderick Crawford, who starred in the early cop drama "Highway Patrol." Adjacent is a photo of Jimmy Durante with the message "to Albert, you have a swell place." The photo of Durante catches him in profile
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Noir City: Chicago features 16 flicks that shed light on gritty genre - Chicago Sun-Times
Google News - over 5 years
“New York Confidential” (3:30, 9:30 pm Saturday): Once thought lost, this 1955 noir features Broderick Crawford as a mob kingpin whose life is complicated by an unruly hit man (Richard Conte), a restless mistress (Marilyn Maxwell) and a fragile
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Interview: Alan K. Rode Brings 'Noir City' to Chicago's Music Box Theatre - HollywoodChicago.com
Google News - over 5 years
Certainly there is some realism in the film, but it is more of an entertainment mainly because of the cast. Broderick Crawford has the persona projection of a rogue elephant with a toothache. It also stars one of my favorite noir actors, Richard Conte
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The 100 Essential Directors Part 3: George Cukor - John Ford - PopMatters
Google News - over 5 years
Unforgettable: Cukor crafted numerous classic scenes, but the one that truly represents his skills with actors is the gin game between Billie (Judy Holliday) and Harry (Broderick Crawford) in Born Yesterday (1950). While the scene has little dialogue,
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Feeling blue on the red planet - Denton Record Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
But opposing him is Austin power broker Thomas Craden (Broderick Crawford), who wants to make Texas into an even larger independent country with himself at the head. Both sides look to Sam Houston (Moroni Olsen), who has disappeared into remote Apache
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KCKCC's NYSP keeps getting stronger - Kansas City Kansan (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Members of the Group H championship team included Janellis Boroquez, Cullen Brown, Cameron Buck, Robert Burgess Jr., Colleen Carroll, Broderick Crawford, Taylor Ervin, Alexander Garvin, Raven Henson, Shelbi Hill, Brittany Hillman, Terry Hunter Jr.,
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Running on a full tank - Denton Record Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
Broderick Crawford is their persecuted Jewish-German professor. Mitchum marries Olivia de Havilland, a Swedish nurse (seriously). They go to work in a small-town clinic headed by Charles Bickford. In between, many recognizable, but often unnameable,
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1975 Jeff Bridges comedy can be manufactured on demand - Deseret News
Google News - over 5 years
Intense film noir thriller, intertwining three stories as FBI investigator Broderick Crawford follows up on cases left behind by a murdered agent. As he solves each case, he moves closer to the killer. It's marred a bit by its low budget,
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Courtroom-based films coming to Lyric - TCPalm
Google News - over 5 years
All the King's Men (1949): Broderick Crawford (winning Best Actor that year) shouts his way through his role of Willie Stark, a once honest dirt farmer who becomes a corrupt governor. Fortunately, Crawford never becomes overbearing in Robert Rossen's
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It Should Happen to You - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But honestly, the one I don't like much is BORN YESTERDAY—for me it doesn't have the same cinematic flow and I would have liked the original actor from the stage Paul Douglas in Broderick Crawford's role because I believe it would have made it more
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Robert Sean Leonard's Broadway Play to Close This Weekend - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Billie, of course, falls for the handsome tutor in this remake of the 1950 movie of the same name which starred Judy Holliday, Broderick Crawford, and William Holden. The comedy by Garson Kanin (who died in 1999) was directed by Doug Hughes who has
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'Born Yesterday' gets a contemporary spin today - Irish Echo
Google News - over 5 years
When George Cukor filmed the play in 1950, William Holden played Paul Verrall, Broderick Crawford was Harry. Judy Holliday recreated her original triumphant stage role, and won an Academy Award for it. Doug Hughes' production of “Born Yesterday,” with
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Evocan a John Wayne, mito del género western, a 32 años de su deceso - SDP Noticias
Google News - over 5 years
En esa ocasión compartió nominación con Kirk Douglas por "El ídolo de barro", Gregory Peck por "Almas en la hoguera", Richard Todd por "Alma en tinieblas" y Broderick Crawford por "El político", siendo este último el que se llevó la estatuilla
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Recomendación: "El político" (1949) - Gente Digital
Google News - over 5 years
La película consiguió siete nominaciones al Oscar y lo ganó a la mejor actriz secundaria para Mercedes McCambridge, mejor actor para un soberbio Broderick Crawford y mejor película. En 2006 se hizo un remake por todos lo alto titulado Todos los hombres
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A night of too many stars on 'Too Big to Fail' - South Coast Today
Google News - over 5 years
A bootlegger (Broderick Crawford) with social pretensions must contend with four corpses in the 1952 mystery farce "Stop, You're Killing Me" (1:30 am, Eastern, TCM). A visit to a specialist on "How I Met Your Mother" (8 pm, CBS, TV-PG, r)
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Cine en Zabalotegi Aretoa y cine club en el gaztetxe - Diario Vasco
Google News - almost 6 years
Una película con tres Oscar y un Globo de Oro que presenta a Willi Stark (Broderick Crawford), un hombre honrado y valiente que sufre una transformación el día que decide entrar en política y descubre que todo es juego sucio
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Movies on TV, monday - Regina Leader-Post
Google News - almost 6 years
(39) >> "Stop, You're Killing Me" Broderick Crawford. Ex-beer baron finds loot and bodies in his Saratoga house. (1 hr., 30 mins.) (102) >>> "The Ghost Writer" Pierce Brosnan. A ghostwriter's latest project lands him in jeopardy. (2 hrs., 15 mins
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Broderick Crawford
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1986
    Age 74
    He died following a series of strokes in 1986 at the age of 74 in Rancho Mirage, California.
    More Details Hide Details He has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, one for motion pictures at 6901 Hollywood Boulevard and another for television at 6734 Hollywood Boulevard.
  • 1982
    Age 70
    His last role was as a film producer who is murdered in a 1982 episode of the Simon and Simon television series.
    More Details Hide Details The actor who played the part of the suspected murderer was Stuart Whitman, who had played the recurring part of Sergeant Walters on Highway Patrol. Throughout his adult life, Crawford was prone to bouts of heavy alcohol consumption, and was known for eating large meals. These habits contributed to a serious weight gain for Crawford during the 1950s. His weight and penchant for heavy drinking contributed to several injuries suffered on the set of Highway Patrol. It became particularly difficult for Crawford to perform certain scenes, such as when he had to enter and exit a police helicopter. In 1958, Crawford broke his ankle while exiting the helicopter and was forced to wear an ankle cast, which may be seen in some episodes. Crawford's heavy drinking increased during the filming of Highway Patrol, eventually resulting in several arrests and stops for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), which eventually gained him a suspended driving license. While representing the California Highway Patrol as "Chief Mathews", Crawford was known with considerable embarrassment by the CHP as "Old 502" due to his habit of driving under the influence of alcohol ("Code 502" was the CHP police radio code for drunken driving). According to the show's creator, Guy Daniels, "We got all the dialogue in by noon, or else we wouldn't get it done at all. He Crawford would bribe people to bring him booze on the set."
  • 1977
    Age 65
    Spoofing his most famous TV role, he wore the trademark fedora and black suit when he made an appearance as guest host of a 1977 episode of NBC's Saturday Night Live that included a spoof of Highway Patrol.
    More Details Hide Details In an episode of CHiPs Crawford appeared as himself, recognized after being stopped by Officer Poncherello, who presses a reluctant Crawford to give his trademark line from Highway Patrol ("Twenty-One-Fifty to Headquarters!"). Musician Webb Wilder's instrumental, "Ruff Rider" (on the album It Came From Nashville), is dedicated to Broderick Crawford in admiration of his Highway Patrol character's ability to solve any crime committed in California by setting up a road block. Crawford worked in 140 motion pictures and television series during his career and remained an especially durable presence in television.
    In 1977, he starred as J.
    More Details Hide Details Edgar Hoover in the TV movie The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover. He would eventually make a series of guest appearances on several TV programs, while starring in several made-for-TV movies.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1970
    Age 58
    From 1970–71, he played the role of Dr. Peter Goldstone in The Interns.
    More Details Hide Details
    After 1970, Crawford again returned to television.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1962
    Age 50
    Between 1962–70, Crawford appeared in no less than seventeen additional films, though many of them failed to generate much box office success.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1960
    Age 48
    After 1960, he began to accept occasional roles in European-made films.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1959
    Age 47
    Highway Patrol helped revive Crawford's career and cement his 'tough guy' persona, which he used successfully in numerous movie and TV roles for the rest of his life. Fed up with the show's hectic shooting schedule, Crawford quit Highway Patrol at the end of 1959 in order to make a film in Spain, and try to get his drinking under control.
    More Details Hide Details Crawford's successful run as Dan Mathews in Highway Patrol earned him some two million dollars under his contract with ZIV, who eventually paid him in exchange for Crawford's agreement to sign for the pilot and subsequent production of a new ZIV production, King of Diamonds. Recently back from Europe, and having temporarily stopped drinking, Crawford was signed to play the starring role as diamond industry security chief John King. King of Diamonds was picked up for syndication in 1961, but ran for only one season before being cancelled. In 1962, after the end of King of Diamonds, Crawford returned to acting in motion pictures.
  • 1955
    Age 43
    For much of the period from 1955 until 1965 most of Crawford's television roles involved ZIV Television, which was among the relative handful of producers willing to accept the occasional challenges inherent with working with the hard-living and hard-drinking Crawford.
    More Details Hide Details Years later, Frederick Ziv admitted in an interview, "To be honest, Broderick could be a handful!"
    In 1955, television producer Frederick Ziv of ZIV Television Productions offered Crawford the lead role as "Dan Mathews" in the police drama Highway Patrol, which dramatized law enforcement activities of the California Highway Patrol (CHP).
    More Details Hide Details ZIV Television Productions operated on an extremely low budget of $25,000 per episode of Highway Patrol with ten percent of gross receipts going to Crawford as per his contract. While the show's scripts were largely fictional, the use of realistic dialogue and Crawford's convincing portrayal of a hard-as-nails police official helped make the show an instant success. Highway Patrol remained popular during its four years (1955–1959) of first-run syndication, and would continue in repeat syndication on local stations across the United States for many years after.
    In 1955, Crawford assumed the starring role as Rollo Lamar, the most violent of convicts in Big House, U.S.A. (1955).
    More Details Hide Details In the film, Crawford's character is a hardened convict so violent he commands the obedience of even the most violent and psychotic prisoners in the prison yard, including those portrayed by such famous tough-guy actors as Charles Bronson, Ralph Meeker, William Talman, and Lon Chaney, Jr.. His Academy Award and larger-than-life persona eventually won him more diverse roles, and he would appear in such varied films as Phil Karlson's Scandal Sheet (1952), Fritz Lang's Human Desire (1954), Federico Fellini's Il bidone (1955) and Richard Fleischer's Between Heaven and Hell (1956). He was rather improbable as a fast-draw outlaw opposite Glenn Ford in the 1956 western, The Fastest Gun Alive. He appeared also in Stanley Kramer's Not as a Stranger (1955) with Olivia de Havilland, Robert Mitchum and Frank Sinatra. Some say it was "the worst film with the best cast". He even tried the European sword and sandal films in Vittorio Cottafavi's La vendetta di Ercole (1960), known in the U.S. as Goliath and the Dragon, and in Javier Setó's The Castilian (1963).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1949
    Age 37
    In 1949, Crawford reached the pinnacle of his acting career when he was cast as Willie Stark, a character inspired by and closely patterned after the life of Louisiana politician Huey Long, in All the King's Men, a film based on the popular novel by Robert Penn Warren.
    More Details Hide Details The film was a huge hit, and Crawford's performance as the bullying, blustering, yet insecure Governor Stark won him the Academy Award for Best Actor. The following year, the actor would star in another hit 'A'-list production with William Holden and Judy Holliday, Born Yesterday. Until filming All the King's Men, Crawford's career had been largely limited to "B films" in supporting or character roles. He realized he did not fit the role of a handsome leading man, once describing himself as looking like a "retired pugilist". Nevertheless, he excelled in roles playing villains.
  • 1944
    Age 32
    During World War II Crawford enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps. Assigned to the Armed Forces Network, he was sent to Britain in 1944 as a sergeant, he served as an announcer for the Glenn Miller American Band.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1942
    Age 30
    He followed this up with another important supporting actor role in the 1942 gangster spoof Larceny, Inc., a comedy with Edward G. Robinson.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1939
    Age 27
    In 1939, he was selected for a supporting role in the production of Beau Geste.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1937
    Age 25
    He gained fame in 1937 as Lenny in Of Mice and Men on Broadway.
    More Details Hide Details He moved to Hollywood, but did not play the role in the film version.
  • 1932
    Age 20
    Crawford returned to vaudeville and radio, which included a period with the Marx Brothers on the radio comedy show Flywheel, Shyster, and Flywheel. He played his first serious character as a footballer in She Loves Me Not at the Adelphi Theatre, London in 1932.
    More Details Hide Details Crawford was originally stereotyped as a fast-talking tough guy early in his career and often played villainous parts.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1911
    Born
    Born on December 9, 1911.
    More Details Hide Details
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