Buddy Rich
Jazz drummer and bandleader
Buddy Rich
Bernard "Buddy" Rich was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. Rich was billed as "the world's greatest drummer" and was known for his virtuosic technique, power, groove, and speed.
Biography
Buddy Rich's personal information overview.
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Brothers band together for rare concert - Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
They've appeared on scores of albums, individually and in support of the likes of Buddy Rich, Elvin Jones and Tony Bennett. Joe La Barbera is justifiably famous as the drummer in the last great trio of legendary pianist Bill Evans
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La Barberas come home to Mount Morris - The Livingston County News
Google News - over 5 years
By the late sixties John was playing trumpet in the great Buddy Rich Orchestra. It was in that band that he developed his love for composition and arranging. He went on to play and write for many of the great big bands and is now one of the most
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Barbone Street Jazz Band performs Thursday - Shore News Today
Google News - over 5 years
Members of the band have played with many jazz greats such as Coleman Hawkins, Thelonious Monk, Buddy Rich, Billie Holiday, Lester Young, and Max Roach and also perform in orchestras and clubs in and around the Philadelphia area
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Peter Cater big band dates announced - MusicRadar.com
Google News - over 5 years
Cater and his tribute to the music of Buddy Rich will swing into Southend's Palace Theater on 28 September and the White Rock Theater in Hastings the following night. The show sees Cater and his band of 15 supremely talented players run through some of
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Season finale for Music and Movies is Monday - Cannon Falls Beacon
Google News - over 5 years
Back by popular demand is Swing Street, a 17-piece big band based in southeast Minnesota with a repertoire including hits from Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Arturo Sandoval, Gordon Goodwin,
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Rebecca Parris returns to arts center - The Daily News of Newburyport
Google News - over 5 years
Parris, who has been dubbed "Boston's First Lady of Jazz," will take the stage at 7 pm The performer has played all around the world and joined with some of jazz's greatest legends, including Dizzy Gillespie, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Terry Gibbs,
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Buddy Rich, Gannin Arnold and Peter Erskine DVDs - antiMUSIC.com
Google News - over 5 years
On Tuesday Buddy Rich, Gannin Arnold and Peter Erskine DVDs was a top story. Here is the recap: Drum Channel has released three new DVDs for Buddy Rich, Gannin Arnold and Peter Erskine. Here is the info they sent over: The Special Edition of Buddy Rich
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Daniel Jackson tribute concert Sunday - SignOnSanDiego.com
Google News - over 5 years
Equally adept on piano and tenor sax, Jackson rose to prominence performing in the bands of Ray Charles, Buddy Rich and Willie Bobo. He will be the star performer Sunday at an all-ages concert in his honor at Liberty Hall Theater in National City's
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Chicago jazz artist performs in Portage - nwitimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
He has performed with some of music's most famous notables, including Stan Kenton, Henry Mancini, Woody Herman, Maynard Ferguson, Buddy Rich, Ella Fitzgerald, Quincy Jones, Isaac Hayes, Frank Sinatra, Wayne Newton, Johnny Mathis
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Rochester Jazz Fest: The Kenny Barron Trio - Artvoice
Google News - over 5 years
Barron started his professional jazz career at age 19 in New York and has played for and with everyone from Lee Morgan and James Moody to Dizzy Gillespie, Milt Jackson, Yusef Lateef, Buddy Rich and many more… He received at least nine Grammy Award
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Gorillas take to the stage at Rush's Vancouver concert - Straight.com
Google News - over 5 years
A few minutes ago Neil Peart delivered his patented, Buddy Rich-inspired workout on the skins, making jaws drop. And now the band is in the midst of "Temples of Syrinx", the raging metal anthem from its finest album, 2112. It doesn't get any better
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Today in Music History - June 30 - mysask.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
In 1917, jazz drummer Buddy Rich was born in Brooklyn, New York. Beginning in the late 1930's, Rich drummed with a succession of big bands, including Bunny Berrigan, Artie Shaw and Tommy Dorsey. Rich's first big band of his own -- started in 1945 with
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On This Day in History: June 28 Producer of Great Comedies - Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
When he was a little older the family moved to Brighton Beach where they lived a few doors away from famed drummer Buddy Rich, who taught Mel to play drums. Then the family moved to 111 Lee St. in Williamsburg, where Mel attended Eastern District High
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Castellanos, Jazz on Tap at Dizzy's - San Diego Reader (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The father of modern jazz drumming, Papa Jo Jones, began as a dancer, as did the notorious Buddy Rich. Perhaps the virtuoso of them all was "Baby" Laurence (Jackson), who, in 1960 played a long-term engagement with Charles Mingus at The Showplace in
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The incredibly ugly naked mole-rats - Syracuse New Times
Google News - over 5 years
... The Maria Schneider Jazz Orchestra, The Buddy Rich Big Band, The Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra, The Duke Ellington Orchestra and The Count Basie Orchestra, as well as arrangements by such leading jazz writers as Mike Tomaro, Oliver Nelson,
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Jazz series ends tonight in ArtHouse - Rome Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
... 308 W. Bloomfield St., The tenor saxophone player "has reached a dignified status as a widely respected master of the tenor through his achievements in the big bands of Woody Herman, Buddy Rich, Carla Bley and the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Buddy Rich
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1987
    Age 69
    Buddy Rich continued touring and performing until the end of his life. On April 2, 1987, he died of heart failure following surgery for a malignant brain tumor.
    More Details Hide Details He was interred in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles. He was 69. Rich typically held his sticks using the traditional grip. He also used the matched grip technique at times when playing on the floor toms (as captured in early video footage) and sometimes around the drum set while performing cross-stickings (crossing arm over arm), which was one of his party tricks, often leading to loud cheers from the audience. Another technique he used to impress during his performances was the stick-trick: a fast roll performed by slapping two drumsticks together in a circular motion using "taps" or single-stroke stickings. He often used contrasting techniques to keep long drum solos from getting mundane. Aside from his energetic, explosive displays, he would go into quieter passages. One passage he would use in most solos started with a simple single-stroke roll on the snare picking up speed and power, then slowly moving his sticks closer to the rim as he got quieter, and eventually playing on just the rim itself while still maintaining speed. Then he would reverse the effect and slowly move towards the center of the snare while increasing power.
  • 1985
    Age 67
    In a 1985 interview, Adler clarified the extent of his teacher-student relationship with Rich and their collaboration on the instructional book. "I had nothing to do with rumor that I taught Buddy how to play.
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  • 1983
    Age 65
    While recovering from a heart attack in 1983, Rich was presented with a 1940s-vintage Slingerland Radio King set – refurbished by Joe MacSweeney of Eames Drums – which he used until his death in 1987.
    More Details Hide Details Rich's typical setup included a 14"X24" bass drum, a 9"X13" mounted tom, two 16"X16" floor toms (with the second tom serving as a towel holder), and a 5.5"X14" snare drum. His cymbals were typically Avedis Zildjian: 14" New Beat hi-hats, 20" medium ride, 6" or 8" splash, two 18" crashes (thin and medium-thin), and later a 22" swish. Rich was known to have a short temper. Dusty Springfield reportedly slapped Rich after several days of "putting up with Rich's insults and show-biz sabotage". He was also known for his rivalry with Frank Sinatra—which sometimes ended in brawls—when both were members of Tommy Dorsey's band. However, the two remained lifelong friends and Sinatra delivered a eulogy at Rich's funeral. Billy Cobham stated he once met Rich in a club and asked him to sign his snare but Rich dropped it down the stairs.
  • 1981
    Age 63
    One of his most widely seen television performances was in a 1981 episode of The Muppet Show, in which he engaged Muppet drummer "Animal" (played by Ronnie Verrell) in a drum battle.
    More Details Hide Details Rich's famous televised drum battles also included Gene Krupa, Ed Shaughnessy and Louie Bellson. On an episode of Michael Parkinson's British talk show, Parkinson kidded Rich about his Donny Osmond kick, by claiming that Rich was the president of The Osmonds' fan club.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1973
    Age 55
    In 1973, PBS broadcast and syndicated Rich's February 6, 1973, performance at the Top of the Plaza in Rochester, New York.
    More Details Hide Details It was the first time thousands of drummers were exposed to Buddy in a full-length concert setting, and many drummers continue to name this program as a prime influence on their own playing.
  • FORTIES
  • 1967
    Age 49
    Rich starred in a 1967 summer replacement television series called Away We Go along with singer Buddy Greco and comedian George Carlin.
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  • 1966
    Age 48
    Perhaps his most popular later performance was a big-band arrangement of a medley derived from Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story, first released on the 1966 album Swingin' New Big Band.
    More Details Hide Details The "West Side Story medley" is a complex big-band arrangement which highlights Rich's ability to blend the rhythm of his drumming into his band's playing of the musical chart. Penned by Bill Reddie, Rich received the West Side Story arrangement of Leonard Bernstein's melodies from the famed musical in the mid-1960s and found it challenging. It consists of many rapid-fire time changes and signatures and took almost a month of constant rehearsals to perfect. It later became a staple in all his performances, clocking in at various lengths from seven to fifteen minutes. In 2002, a DVD was released called The Lost West Side Story Tapes that captured a 1985 performance of this along with other numbers. After the "West Side Story Medley", Rich's most famous performance was the "Channel One Suite" by Bill Reddie. Like the "West Side Story Medley", the "Channel One Suite" generally was a quite long performance ranging from about 12 minutes to about 26 minutes and usually contained two or three drum solos. A recording of one of his live performances was released in January 2001, which contained a 26-minute "Channel One Suite".
    For most of the period from 1966 until his death, he led successful big bands in an era when the popularity of big bands had waned from their 1930s and 1940s peak.
    More Details Hide Details In this later period, Rich continued to play clubs, but stated in multiple interviews that the great majority of his big bands' performances were at high schools, colleges and universities, with club performances done to a much lesser degree. Rich also served as the session drummer for many recordings, where his playing was often much more understated than in his own big-band performances. Especially notable were Rich's sessions for recordings of Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, on which he worked with pianist Oscar Peterson and his famous trio featuring bassist Ray Brown and guitarist Herb Ellis. In 1968 Rich collaborated with the Indian drummer Ustad Alla Rakha in the studio album "Rich à la Rakha" by Buddy Rich and Alla Rakha.
    In 1966, Rich left James to develop a new big band.
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    In the early fifties Rich played with Dorsey and began to perform with trumpeter Harry James, an association which lasted until 1966.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1946
    Age 28
    In 1946, Rich formed his own band with financial support from Sinatra, and continued to lead different groups on and off until the early fifties.
    More Details Hide Details In addition to Tommy Dorsey (1939–42, 1945, 1954–55), Rich also played with Benny Carter (1942), Harry James (1953–56–62, 1964, 1965), Les Brown, Charlie Ventura, and Jazz at the Philharmonic, as well as leading his own band and performing with all-star groups.
  • 1942
    Age 24
    In 1942, Rich left the Dorsey band to join the United States Marine Corps.
    More Details Hide Details He rejoined the Dorsey group after leaving the Marines two years later.
  • 1938
    Age 20
    In 1938, he was hired to play in Tommy Dorsey's orchestra, where he met and performed with Frank Sinatra.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1937
    Age 19
    Rich first played jazz with a major group in 1937 with Joe Marsala and guitarist Jack Lemaire.
    More Details Hide Details He then played with Bunny Berigan (1938) and Artie Shaw (1939), and even instructed a 14-year-old Mel Brooks in drumming for a short period when playing for Shaw. At 21, Rich participated in his first major recording with the Vic Schoen Orchestra (the band that backed the Andrews Sisters).
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1917
    Born
    Born on September 30, 1917.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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