Profile

Burt Hooton

Professional Baseball Player + Pitcher + Coach
Male
Born Feb 7, 1950

Burt Carlton Hooton, nicknamed "Happy", is an American former right-handed starting pitcher and current coach in Major League Baseball. He won 151 games over a 15-year career, mostly with the Chicago Cubs and Los Angeles Dodgers. Hooton's career began auspiciously with a no-hitter in his fourth major league game for the Cubs, but he gained perhaps his widest recognition for his several playoff performances with the Dodgers.… Read More

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News + Updates

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  • Cubs Post 5th Consecutive Win
    Huffington Post Sports - Jun 01, 2013
  • Wood Hits Grand Slam In Cubs' 8 3 Win Over Sox
    Huffington Post - May 31, 2013
  • Week 5 High School Football Picks: Where's Amy Adams When I Need Her?
    The Morning Call - Blogs - Sep 28, 2012
  • Gary Gaetti To Lead Sugar Land Franchise In The Atlantic League New York Baseball Digest
    Google News - Sep 02, 2011

Timeline

Learn about the memorable moments in the evolution of Burt Hooton.

CHILDHOOD

1950 Birth Born on February 7, 1950.

TEENAGE

Hooton attended the University of Texas at Austin, where he had a College Hall of Fame career, was a three-time All-American from 1969–71 and set several school and conference records. … Read More

TWENTIES

1971 21 Years Old After college, Hooton was selected by the Cubs with the second pick of the 1971 amateur draft. … Read More
1972 22 Years Old He began 1972 in outstanding fashion, pitching a 4-0 no-hitter against the Philadelphia Phillies at Wrigley Field on April 16, the second day of the strike-delayed season.
1975 25 Years Old But he was unable to win consistently as the team's fortunes declined in the early 1970s, and he was traded to Los Angeles in May 1975 after compiling a 34-44 record with a steadily increasing earned run average. … Read More
1976 26 Years Old After a disappointing 1976 season, he used his strong knuckle curve to become a valuable member of the pennant-winning teams of the next two years, leading the staff with 153 strikeouts in 1977 and with 19 wins and a 2.71 ERA in 1978. … Read More
1977 27 Years Old Hooton started Game 3 of the 1977 NLCS against the Phillies, but was pulled after issuing three consecutive bases-loaded walks in the second inning; the Dodgers came back to win 6-5. … Read More
1978 28 Years Old The 1978 playoffs were rematches; in Game 1 of the NLCS against the Phillies, Hooton left after allowing three runs in the fifth inning, although the Dodgers still led 7-4 and went on to win the game. … Read More

THIRTIES

1981 31 Years Old Hooton's career began auspiciously with a no-hitter in his fourth major league game for the Cubs, but he gained perhaps his widest recognition for his several playoff performances with the Dodgers. His only All-Star appearance was in 1981, when he also was named the NLCS Most Valuable Player on the way to helping the Dodgers to a World Series championship with four postseason wins in five appearances. He is currently the pitching coach of the Fort Wayne TinCaps, the Class-A affiliate of the San Diego Padres. Hooton attended Richard King High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, leading the Mustangs to a 4A State Championship in the school's second year of operation in 1967. … Read More
1984 34 Years Old …  Hooton remained with the Dodgers for three more years, but with a combined record of just 16-21; he spent most of 1984 in the bullpen. … Read More
1985 35 Years Old Hooton played his last season in 1985 for the Texas Rangers after signing with them as a free agent, going 5-8.
1988 38 Years Old Hooton returned to the University of Texas to earn his degree in journalism and then began a career as a pitching coach. He first worked in the Dodgers organization in 1988 with the Class A Salem (Oregon) Dodgers.

FORTIES

1990 40 Years Old He moved up to the pitching coach of the Double-A San Antonio Missions from 1990–1994 and then in 1995–96 with the Triple-A Albuquerque Dukes.
1997 47 Years Old He returned to the University of Texas again, as the pitching coach from 1997–1999. … Read More

FIFTIES

2005 55 Years Old In 2005 he returned to Round Rock as pitching coach until 2010, when the team moved to Oklahoma City, where he worked in the same position through the end of the 2012 season.

LATE ADULTHOOD

2013 63 Years Old In 2013, he was hired as the pitching coach for the Fort Wayne TinCaps, the Class-A affiliate of the San Diego Padres.
Original Authors of this text are noted on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burt_Hooton.
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