Carter Ham
United States general
Carter Ham
Carter F. Ham is a United States Army general, who serves as the second and current Commander, U.S. Africa Command. In that position, he has been in command of the initial 2011 military intervention in Libya. Ham previously served as Commanding General, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army from August 28, 2008 to March 8, 2011. Prior to that, he served as Director for Operations (J-3) at the Joint Staff from August 2007 to August 2008 and the Commanding General, U.S.
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Ranking Member Elijah Cummings BLASTS Chairman Darrell Issa about trip to Libya to investigate Benghazi – see letter
Fox News - over 3 years
Below is from FNC Chad Pergram: First a note from Chad, and then the letter from Ranking Member Cummings: “Below is a letter from the House Oversight Committee Democrats saying that Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-CA) is violating committee rules by not taking a “bipartisan” trip to Libya to probe Benghazi.  However, Issa’s staff will not confirm nor deny any travel by the chairman and declined any comment about the Cummings missive.” —— September 20, 2013 The Honorable Darrell E. Issa Chairman Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515   Dear Mr. Chairman:   I am writing to request that you immediately postpone your upcoming delegation to Libya and several other countries until you come into compliance with your own Committee directives, stop your partisan efforts to deliberately exclude Democrats from this trip, and provide adequate notice to allow Democratic Members to join this delegat ...
Article Link:
Fox News article
Former military head says it was quickly clear terrorists behind Benghazi consulate attack
Fox News - over 3 years
The former head of U.S. forces in Africa, General Carter Ham, told the Aspen Security Forum that it quickly became clear the assault on the American consulate in Benghazi last year was a terrorist attack and not a spontaneous demonstration.
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Fox News article
Michael Shank: Barack Obama's Africa Trip Misses Military Mission Creep on Continent
Huffington Post - over 3 years
This week, as President Barack Obama travels to Senegal, South Africa, and Tanzania, he will miss much of America's mission creep into the African continent. Not merely in the more obvious military interventions into Libya, Mali or Somalia, or military bases in Niger or Djibouti, but through growing security partnerships in places including Kenya, Nigeria and even Mauritania. Not on President Obama's oversight agenda: The troubling ramp up of military and counterterror assistance to these countries and the human rights abuses committed by these same actors. It should be. While President Barack Obama's recent counterterrorism speech failed to address these problems, ongoing events in Nigeria have spurred Secretary of State John Kerry to express "deep concern" around human rights abuses committed by the Nigerian military, a major U.S. counterterror partner. But given that a recent U.N. report also found U.S.-trained Congolese troops guilty of mass rape and other atrocities, ...
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Huffington Post article
Nick Turse: The Terror Diaspora
The Huffington Post - over 3 years
The U.S. Military and the Unraveling of Africa  Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com The Gulf of Guinea. He said it without a hint of irony or embarrassment. This was one of U.S. Africa Command’s big success stories. The Gulf... of Guinea.    Never mind that most Americans couldn’t find it on a map and haven’t heard of the nations on its shores like Gabon, Benin, and Togo. Never mind that just five days before I talked with AFRICOM’s chief spokesman, the Economist had asked if the Gulf of Guinea was on the verge of becoming “another Somalia,” because piracy there had jumped 41% from 2011 to 2012 and was on track to be even worse in 2013.  The Gulf of Guinea was one of the primary areas in Africa where “stability,” the command spokesman assured me, had “improved significantly,” and the U.S. military had played a major role in bringing it about. But what did that say about so many other areas of the continent that, since AFRICOM was set up, had been wracked by coups, insu ...
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The Huffington Post article
U.S. Africa Command head Carter Ham to testify on Benghazi for first time
CBS News - over 3 years
Gen. Carter Ham was leading U.S. military operations in Africa during the Benghazi embassy attack; hearing will be behind closed doors
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CBS News article
Christopher Holshek: Mali and the Primacy of Civil Authority
Huffington Post - over 3 years
The international donor's conference on Mali co-chaired by France and the European Union earlier this month is another demonstration that "the United States has no choice but to embrace the sound underpinnings" of 'leading from behind.'" (Like "containment" at its start or "restrainment" now, it's better than it sounds.) Of the more than $4-billion pledged in Brussels by over 80 countries, the U.S anted up about $200-million, which will not come until after the election at the end of July. As in the response to the crisis, Malians and other Africans, backed mostly by the Europeans and the United Nations, are leading Mali's recovery. The African-led International Support Mission to Mali (AFISMA) of over 8,000 troops, mostly from ECOWAS countries under Nigerian command, will give way to the UN Multidimensional Integration Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) of 11,200 troops and 1,440 police in time for the elections. In the communiqué from the conference and the UN Secu ...
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Huffington Post article
Officials: General fired over alcohol, sex charges
Fox News - almost 4 years
Defense officials say an Army major general with the U.S. Africa Command has been relieved of his post in connection with alcohol and sexual misconduct charges. He has appealed the dismissal to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. Officials say Maj. Gen. Ralph Baker, commander of the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, was fired from his command last Thursday by Gen. Carter Ham, head of U.S. Africa Command, after an administrative review. Baker took over the task force, based in Djibouti, last May. The allegations against Baker involve harassment and inappropriate contact. He has returned to Washington and is temporarily serving as a special assistant to the vice chief of the Army. Officials weren't authorized to talk publicly about the case so spoke on condition of anonymity.
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Fox News article
US eyes anti-piracy effort along west Africa coast
Fox News - almost 4 years
The U.S. and some of its allies are considering plans to increase anti-piracy operations along Africa's west coast, spurred on by concerns that money from the attacks is funding a Nigerian-based insurgent group that is linked to one of al-Qaida's most dangerous affiliates. Piracy in the Gulf of Guinea has escalated over the past year, and senior U.S. defense and counter-piracy officials say allied leaders are weighing whether beefed up enforcement efforts that worked against pirates off the Somalia coast might also be needed in the waters off Nigeria. There has been growing coordination between Nigeria-based Boko Haram and al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), which was linked to the attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, last September that killed four Americans, including the ambassador. Military leaders say AQIM has become the wealthiest al-Qaida offshoot and an increasing terrorist threat to the region. It has long b ...
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Fox News article
Head of US Africa command warns of Islamic threat
Fox News - almost 4 years
The chief of the U.S. Africa Command warned on Friday that threats from Islamic extremists in Africa are increasing and if unchecked could pose a greater danger to American interests and allies. Army Gen. Carter Ham faced some wary members of the House Armed Services Committee, who questioned a robust U.S. military involvement in Africa after more than a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Ham said the threats in Africa do not match al-Qaida or the Taliban in Afghanistan, "but the trend is not good." "I think we have an opportunity now to work preventive effort in concert with African forces and with allies and friends globally to suppress the threat, to reverse the trend, which is increasingly worrisome to me," Ham told the committee. "And that does not necessitate a large commitment of U.S. forces. And I do not believe that a large commitment of U.S. forces is either necessary nor appropriate under the current circumstance." Ham cited t ...
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Fox News article
Sarwar Kashmeri: America Should Stay Out of Africa
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Why on earth is the United States thinking of setting up drone bases around the African country of Mali when French forces seem to have the situation well in hand? In this instance, American leadership is not just unnecessary but also unwise. Especially when the U.S. record of helping Mali protect its security has already backfired spectacularly. In the wake of 9/11, elite soldiers of the Malian army were trained and equipped by U.S. Special Forces under a $520-$600 million program run by the U.S. Africa Command, or AFRICOM. The idea was to give Mali the resources and skills to defend itself against Islamic insurgents that were spilling into the vast deserts of North Africa. Alas, in spite of years of U.S. efforts, when the rubber hit the road, most of the soldiers decamped to the insurgent side, taking their American arms and training with them. Facing the Malians were battle-hardened Tuareg-warriors, a fierce nomadic people from Northern Mali that Col. Gaddafi used ...
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Huffington Post article
US eyes drone base in Africa with al-Qaida in mind
Fox News - about 4 years
Plans to base unarmed American surveillance drones in the African nation of Niger highlight the Obama administration's growing concern about extremist influences in the volatile region. They also raise tough questions about how to contain al-Qaida and other militant groups without committing U.S. ground forces in yet another war. In the short run, a drone base would enable the U.S. to give France more intelligence on the militants its troops are fighting in neighboring Mali. Over time it could extend the reach not only of American intelligence gathering but also U.S. special operations missions to strengthen Niger's own security forces. The U.S. and Niger in recent days signed a "status of forces agreement" spelling out legal protections and obligations of U.S. forces that might operate in Niger in the future. Pentagon spokesman George Little acknowledged the agreement, but declined Tuesday to discuss U.S. plans for a military presence in Ni ...
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Fox News article
Panetta: US helping French forces with intel
Fox News - about 4 years
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Monday that the U.S. is already providing intelligence-gathering assistance to the French in their assault on Islamist extremists in Mali, and that officials would not rule out having American aircraft land in the North African nation as part of future efforts to lend airlift and logistical support. Speaking to reporters traveling with him to Europe, Panetta said that while al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, also known as AQIM, and other affiliate groups in Mali may not pose an immediate threat to the United States, "ultimately that remains their objective." For that reason, he said, "we have to take steps now so that AQIM does not get that kind of traction." The United States has "a responsibility to go after al-Qaida wherever they are," including Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and North Africa, Panetta said. "We have a responsibility to make sure that al-Qaida doesn't establish a base of operations in norther ...
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Fox News article
US military planners focused on Mali intervention
Fox News - about 4 years
U.S. military planners are working closely with African nations in advance of an offensive to wrest control of northern Mali from al-Qaida linked extremists, Obama administration officials said Wednesday. The cooperation reflects the increasing U.S. and international concern about the political, security and humanitarian challenges in Mali after a military coup ousted the democratically elected government this year. Capitalizing on the upheaval, al-Qaida in Islamic Maghreb, the best financed al-Qaida affiliate, now controls northern Mali — an area the size of Texas. That makes it "the largest territory controlled by Islamic extremists in the world," said Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on African Affairs. Officials from the State and Defense departments told senators that the United States was working with the African Union and ECOWAS, the 15-member Economic Community of West African States, o ...
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Fox News article
Obama praises Petraeus's record as lawmakers quiz FBI director Mueller
Guardian (UK) - over 4 years
Republicans on Capitol Hill suggest an election week coverup of FBI's investigation into former CIA director's personal life Barack Obama has brushed aside Republican suggestions of a coverup over the FBI investigation of the former CIA director, David Petraeus, as critics question why the White House was not informed about the probe until after last week's presidential election. "The FBI has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed," the president told the first press conference since his re-election. "One of the challenges here is we're not supposed to meddle in criminal investigations, and that's our practice." Members of Congress are questioning why the attorney general, Eric Holder, and the FBI director, Robert Mueller, did not notify the president and the heads of congressional intelligence committees about the months-long Petraeus investigation after it was discovered he was having an affair and a separate one into General John Allen, the US commander in Afghanistan, ...
Article Link:
Guardian (UK) article
BENGHAZI NEWS – latest from FNC’s Jennifer Griffin and Adam Housley
Fox News - over 4 years
After more than nine weeks of trying to reconcile their story line with that of the State Department and the CIA, the Pentagon finally released its timeline of the Libya terror attack during a Friday afternoon, off-camera briefing with an official who could only be quoted anonymously.   The news was overtaken almost immediately by the announcement that Gen. David Petraeus had resigned, purportedly due to an extramarital affair. He was slated to testify in closed-door hearings on Capitol Hill this coming week before the Senate and House intelligence committees. Petraeus no longer plans to testify. However, while the Petraeus resignation has since dominated attention in Washington, an examination of the military’s version of events reveals a number of discrepancies and gaps worth closer scrutiny.   THE FIRST DISCREPANCY   The Defense Department timeline on the night of Sept. 11 begins at 9:42 p.m. local time and states, “The incident starts at the facility in Benghazi.” ...
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Fox News article
Bob Cesca: The Selective Patriotism of the Benghazi-Gate Conspiracy Theorists
The Huffington Post - over 4 years
I've had this ongoing theory that if Al Gore had been president during 9/11, the Republicans would've tried to impeach him for allowing it to happen. They would've immediately began screeching the question: What did Gore know and when did he know it? Perhaps while rescue workers were still digging through the rubble at Ground Zero. Instead, Bush was president and the entire nation rallied around him in the wake of the largest terrorist attack on American soil. It was a testament not only to the unflinching patriotism of the American people but to the cooperative fairness of partisan Democrats who shelved their animosity about the 2000 election for the sake of national unity. For many months, only the criminals who committed the attacks were held accountable for 9/11. What we know now is that the Bush administration was, in fact, aware of Bin Laden's determination to engage in a large-scale attack inside the United States (reference to the August 8, 2001 presidential dail ...
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The Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Carter Ham
    FIFTIES
  • 2012
    Age 60
    Ham was in overall command of military forces when the September 11, 2012 terrorist attacks were launched on the American consulate and CIA annex in Benghazi, Libya.
    More Details Hide Details Congressman Trey Gowdy who led the Congressional investigation into the attacks stated that Carter Ham acknowledges that he altered President Obama and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's order to deploy to Benghazi to rescue American personnel, and redirected the deployment to Tripoli, Libya instead. After a normal 24-month tour of duty as Commander, U.S. Africa Command, General Ham was succeeded by General David M. Rodriguez. General Ham retired in June 2013. Ham was quoted in an online Washington Post article by Greg Miller and Craig Whitlock, posted on October 1, 2012, that, as saying, that, as a result of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb's overtaking and capturing more territory in Mali in Africa, and possessing arms from Libya after the Libyan Civil War which overthrew Muammar Gaddafi, there is the possibility of the U.S. assisting, but not leading, counterterrorism operations done by other countries. A more radical step would be the use of drones.
  • 2011
    Age 59
    He assumed the post on March 8, 2011.
    More Details Hide Details Ham was in command of U.S. forces enforcing the Libyan no-fly zone, along with Admiral Samuel J. Locklear. Described as "in charge of the coalition effort", Ham on March 21, 2011 said, "there would be coalition airstrikes on Colonel Qaddafi’s mobile air defenses and that some 80 sorties – only half of them by the United States – had been flown on Monday." Admiral Locklear, aboard the flagship Mount Whitney, had tactical command of the Operation Odyssey Dawn joint taskforce. General Ham also said he had “full authority to attack the regime’s forces if they refused to comply with President Obama’s demands that they pull back from Ajdabiya, Misrata and Zawiya," according to one report. Earlier, he said that the United States was not working with the Libyan rebels. “Our mission is not to support any opposition forces,” Ham said by video feed to the Pentagon from his headquarters in Stuttgart.
    As commander of Africa Command, he led Operation Odyssey Dawn, the initial U.S. role in the 2011 military intervention in Libya.
    More Details Hide Details Ham previously served as the Commanding General of the U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army from August 28, 2008 to March 8, 2011. Prior to that, he served as Director for Operations (J-3) at the Joint Staff from August 2007 to August 2008 and the Commanding General, U.S. 1st Infantry Division from August 2006 to August 2007, and was the commander of Operation Able Sentry in Macedonia in the mid-1990s, during the Yugoslav wars. Ham was born on February 16, 1952 in Portland, Oregon, and attended Charles F. Brush High School. He holds a B.A. in Political Science from John Carroll University, as well as an M.A. in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.
  • 2010
    Age 58
    The U.S. Senate, in November 2010, confirmed Ham's nomination to become the next Commander of U.S. Africa Command, headquartered at Kelley Barracks, Stuttgart, Germany.
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  • 2006
    Age 54
    Ham assumed command of the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas in August 2006 and served as the Commanding General until July 2007, returning to The Joint Staff as Director for Operations, J-3.
    More Details Hide Details On August 28, 2008, Ham became the 34th Commander of the United States Army Europe headquartered at Campbell Barracks, Heidelberg, Germany. In 2010, General Ham served as co-chair for the comprehensive review of issues associated with the repeal of the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy.
  • 2004
    Age 52
    In January 2004, he assumed command of Multinational Brigade (Task Force Olympia) – North in Mosul, Iraq serving there until February 2005.
    More Details Hide Details During his time in Iraq, Ham suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, which was caused by his attending the aftermath of a deadly suicide bombing at a mess hall. He later sought treatment for his condition and publicly encouraged other soldiers to do the same. Returning from Iraq, Ham served as the Deputy Director for Regional Operations, J-3, on The Joint Staff.
  • FORTIES
  • 1999
    Age 47
    From 1999 to 2001 he commanded the 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, then served as Deputy Director, J-8, United States Central Command at MacDill AFB in Tampa, Florida and in Doha, Qatar, during which time he was selected for promotion to Brigadier General.
    More Details Hide Details Ham was subsequently assigned as the Deputy Commanding General for Training and Readiness, I Corps at Fort Lewis, Wash. in August 2003.
  • 1997
    Age 45
    He graduated from the Air War College in 1997 then returned to Germany where he served as G-3, then Chief of Staff, 1st Infantry Division.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1990
    Age 38
    He attended the College of Naval Command and Staff, graduating with distinction in 1990, and was then assigned to the U.S. Army Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia.
    More Details Hide Details He served a tour as an advisor with a Saudi Arabian National Guard Brigade in Riyadh as part of OPM-SANG then returned to Fort Benning, where he was the executive officer for the Infantry School. Ham commanded the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry in Vilseck, Germany including a six-month tour with the United Nations Protection Forces in the Republic of Macedonia. Following battalion command, he was the Senior Observer/Controller of the Timberwolf Team at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany.
  • 1984
    Age 32
    In 1984, he served with a joint service unit in support of the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. From 1984 until 1989, Ham served as Assistant Inspector General, then as Battalion S-3 and Executive Officer with the Opposing Force at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1976
    Age 24
    He was commissioned, as an infantry officer, as a Distinguished Military Graduate in 1976.
    More Details Hide Details He later received his master's degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island as well as graduating from several military schools including the Infantry Officer Basic Course, the Armor Officer Advanced Course, the College of Naval Command and Staff of the U.S. Naval War College and the U.S. Air Force Air War College. He is a member of the John Carroll University ROTC Hall of Fame. He and his wife, Christi, are both John Carroll University graduates. Ham's early assignments included service at Fort Knox, Kentucky and tours of duty in Italy and Germany. After graduating from the Armor Officers Advanced Course, he was a Recruiting Area Commander in Lima, Ohio.
  • 1974
    Age 22
    Ham enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1974 and served two years as an infantryman in the 82nd Airborne Division before being accepted in the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (Army ROTC) while attending John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1965
    Age 13
    He received the rank of Eagle Scout as a youth in 1965 and was bestowed the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award in 2012 from the Boy Scouts of America.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1952
    Age 0
    Born on February 16, 1952.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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