Casey Jones
American railroad engineer
Casey Jones
John Luther "Casey" Jones was an American railroad engineer from Jackson, Tennessee, who worked for the Illinois Central Railroad (IC). As a boy, he lived near Cayce, Kentucky, where he acquired the nickname of "Cayce," which he chose to spell as "Casey. " On April 30, 1900, he alone was killed when his passenger train, the Cannonball Express, collided with a stalled freight train at Vaughan, Mississippi, on a foggy and rainy night.
Biography
Casey Jones's personal information overview.
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News
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Mississippi poultry workers vote to unionize - Facing South
Google News - over 5 years
The little town of Water Valley, population approximately 4000, has a long history of unionization that goes back to the days of railroad legend Casey Jones, a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers who died trying to save his passengers in
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Labor activist-singer Joe Hill brought humor, hope to the fight - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
In “Casey Jones - the Union Scab,'' for example, Hill humorously shows a worker (Jones) refusing to join a railroad strike and then falling to a fiery death when his train isn't properly maintained. When Jones gets to heaven, Hill writes that he “went
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EDITORIAL: Smokescreens from smokestackers; EPA counters propaganda - istockAnalyst.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
The longtime polluters of America's air conjure images of Casey Jones' fate, applying catastrophic scenes to our country's finances if power companies have to spend money reducing smokestack emissions. Their public-relations people,
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INCH AZ: Casey Jones - Inside College Hockey
Google News - over 5 years
Background: Jones was hired into his first Division I head coaching position earlier this summer at Clarkson. He had served as an assistant coach at Clarkson under Mark Morris from 1993-95 so he has some familiarity with Clarkson's
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Stars and stripes flying at Casey Jones - Jackson Sun
Google News - over 5 years
The Jackson Madison Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution have the Field of Flags on display at Casey Jones Village in Jackson. / Katie Brake/The Jackson Sun Visitors to the Casey Jones Village can take advantage of a new display — 125
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Texas filmmaker self-funds fan flick about TMNT sidekick Casey Jones - io9
Google News - over 5 years
With almost no budget, Austin filmmaker Polaris Banks made his own 35-minute fan movie about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle's cricket bat-wielding vigilante friend Casey Jones. Banks got Robbie Rist, the voice of Michelangelo in the movies,
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Lone Star Scene: Ninja Turtles fans film 'Casey Jones' - YNN Austin
Google News - over 5 years
With a love of the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" franchise and nearly no budget to work with, filmmaker Polaris Banks didn't follow many rules in the making of "Casey Jones." His ambitious production applied for no city permits while shooting in
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Clarkson's Jones brings changes to hockey program - WatertownDailyTimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
POTSDAM — A lot has changed in the short time Casey Jones has been the Clarkson University men's hockey coach. Since his hiring in late May, Jones has hired two assistant coaches, finalized a recruiting class and moved into a temporary
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Jones joins Clarkson ice staff - WatertownDailyTimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
Head coach Casey Jones chose Jones, who is not related, to join the staff, which also includes former Golden Knight Phil Roy, who had been an assistant at Merrimack. Andy Jones, who was working for Sioux Falls of the USHL, is replacing Chris Rogles,
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Nightlife: See what's coming this weekend to Bell's Eccentric Cafe, The Strutt ... - Kalamazoo Gazette - MLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
6 — Casey Jones and the Beatdown. AUG. 9 — Open mic with Branden Mann. AUG. 10 — Ladies night with Steve Pesch. AUG. 11 — Kris Hitchcock and Small Town Son. 200 E. Michigan Ave., 269-343-2739. EVERY WED — $2 pints, euchre tournament, 8 pm-close
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JR Ventimilia, Joshua Sternin, & Ciro Nieli Talk Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles ... - Comic Book Movie
Google News - over 5 years
They also address the roles of certain characters in the series (such as Casey Jones and April O' Neil), as well as the roles of the Turtles themselves. Since this is a reboot, did you want to do anything to put your own personal spin on the Teenage
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Reflecting back on Zips football from 1985-92 - Monmouth Daily Review Atlas
Google News - over 5 years
Casey Jones was the starting quarterback in the 1990 season. His name makes him sound like an engineer, and he was just that. Casey's ball handling and quick decisions helped two running backs gain over 1000 yards the same year
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All-day fundraiser benefits animal rescue in memory of Amber Kendrick - Jackson Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Renee Allen of Bolivar sings 'Jesus Take the Wheel' during the Amber Kendrick Memorial Foundation benefit on Saturday at the Casey Jones Amphitheater in Casey Jones Village in Jackson. / KENNETH CUMMINGS/The Jackson Sun Family and friends of Amber
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Amber Kendrick Memorial Benefit is July 23 at Casey Jones Village - Jackson Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Casey Jones Village will host the Amber Kendrick Memorial Benefit on July 23 to raise money to help the Kendrick family start a non-profit organization called The Amber D Rescue in honor of their daughter Amber Kendrick. On May 31, Amber was killed
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Sherby Presented with Clarkson's Barben Award - Clarkson Golden Knights
Google News - over 5 years
Clarkson Head Coach Casey Jones presents Tom Sherby with the 2011 Arnold H. Barben Award at Saturday's Alumni Hockey Golf Outing - photo by Gary Mikel Thomas A. Sherby was presented the Arnold H. Barben Award on July 16, 2011 during the Annual Clarkson
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Clarkson hires former defenseman Roy as top assistant - WatertownDailyTimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
POTSDAM — Clarkson University men's hockey coach Casey Jones named Phil Roy his top assistant on Friday. “This is a great opportunity coming back to my alma mater,” Roy said in a statement. “I have always paid attention to what was going on at
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Casey Jones
    THIRTIES
  • 1900
    Age 36
    Died in 1900.
    More Details Hide Details
    His watch stopped at the time of impact: 3:52 am on April 30, 1900.
    More Details Hide Details Popular legend holds that when his body was pulled from the wreckage, his hands still clutched the whistle cord and brake. A stretcher was brought from the baggage car on No. 1, and crewmen of the other trains carried his body to the depot, a half-mile (.80 km) away. The headlines in the Jackson, Tennessee, Sun read: "FATAL WRECK - Engineer Casey Jones, of This City, Killed Near Canton, Miss. - DENSE FOG THE DIRECT CAUSE - Of a Rear End Collision on the Illinois Central. - Fireman and Messenger Injured - Passenger Train Crashed Into a Local Freight Partly on the Siding-Several Cars Demolished." A Jackson, Mississippi, newspaper report described the accident: The south-bound passenger train No. 1 was running under a full head of steam when it crashed into the rear end of a caboose and three freight cars which were standing on the main track, the other portion of the train being on a sidetrack. The caboose and two of the cars were smashed to pieces, the engine left the rails and plowed into an embankment, where it overturned and was completely wrecked, the baggage and mail coaches also being thrown from the track and badly damaged. The engineer was killed outright by the concussion. His body was found lying under the cab, with his skull crushed and right arm torn from its socket. The fireman jumped just in time to save his life.
    There he worked with his next and last fireman, Simeon T. "Sim" Webb in 1900.
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    He was killed on April 30, 1900 when his train collided with a stalled freight train near Vaughan, Mississippi.
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    Jones drove the engine until he transferred to Memphis in February 1900.
    More Details Hide Details No. 638 stayed in Water Valley. That year he drove the engine that became most closely associated with him, for one time. That was Engine No. 382, known affectionately as "Ole 382.", or "Cannonball". It was a steam-driven Rogers 4-6-0 "Ten Wheeler" with six drivers, each approximately six feet (1.8 m) high. Bought new in 1898 from the Rogers Locomotive Works, it was a very powerful engine for the time. When a potential disaster arose, all of Jones' skill and the engine's responsiveness were put to the greatest test. His regular fireman on No. 638 was his close friend, John Wesley McKinnie, with whom he worked exclusively from about 1897 until he went to the passenger run out of Memphis.
  • 1898
    Age 34
    Jones was an avid baseball fan and watched or participated in the game whenever his schedule allowed. During the 1880s he had played at Columbus, Kentucky, while he was a cub operator on the M & O. One Sunday during the summer of 1898, the Water Valley shop team was scheduled to play the Jackson shop team and Jones got to haul the team to Jackson for the game.
    More Details Hide Details Jones was issued nine citations for rules infractions in his career, with a total of 145 days suspended. But in the year prior to his death, Jones had not been cited for any rules infractions. Railroaders who worked with Jones liked him but admitted that he was a bit of a risk taker. Unofficially though, the penalties were far more severe for running behind than breaking the rules. He was by all accounts an ambitious engineer, eager to move up the seniority ranks and serve on the better-paying, more prestigious passenger trains. Jones in February 1900 was transferred from Jackson, Tennessee, to Memphis, Tennessee, for the passenger run between Memphis and Canton, Mississippi. This was one link of a four-train run between Chicago, Illinois, and New Orleans, Louisiana, the so-called "cannonball" passenger run. "Cannonball" was a contemporary term applied to fast mail and fast passenger trains of those days, but it was a generic term for speed service. This run offered the fastest schedules in the history of American railroading. Some veteran engineers doubted the times could be met and some quit.
  • 1895
    Age 31
    He recounts an incident in 1895 as Jones' train approached Michigan City, Mississippi.
    More Details Hide Details He had left the cab in charge of fellow Engineer Bob Stevenson, who had reduced speed sufficiently for Jones to walk safely out on the running board to oil the relief valves. He advanced from the running board to the steam chest and then to the pilot beam to adjust the spark screen. He had finished well before they arrived at the station, as planned, and was returning to the cab when he noticed a group of small children dart in front of the train some ahead. All cleared the rails easily except for a little girl who suddenly froze in fear at the sight of the oncoming iron horse. Jones shouted to Stevenson to reverse the train and yelled to the girl to get off the tracks in almost the same breath. Realizing that she was still immobile, he raced to the tip of the pilot or cowcatcher and braced himself on it, reaching out as far as he could to pull the frightened but unharmed girl from the rails. The event was partially spoofed in The Brave Engineer, in which the hero rescued a damsel from a cliché bandit.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1890
    Age 26
    His work in Jackson primarily involved freight service between Jackson and Water Valley, Mississippi. Both locations were busy and important stops for IC, and he developed close ties with them between 1890 and 1900.
    More Details Hide Details Jones was also famous for his peculiar skill with the train whistle. His whistle was made of six thin tubes bound together, the shortest being half the length of the longest. Its unique sound involved a long-drawn-out note that began softly, rose and then died away to a whisper, a sound that became his trademark. The sound of it was variously described as "a sort of whippoorwill call," or "like the war cry of a Viking." People living along the IC line between Jackson and Water Valley would turn over in their beds late at night upon hearing it and say "There goes Casey Jones" as he roared by. During the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago, Illinois, in 1893, IC was charged with providing commuter service for the thousands of visitors to the fairground. A call was sent out for trainmen who wanted to work there. Jones answered it, spending a pleasant summer there with his wife. He shuttled many people from Van Buren Street to Jackson Park during the exposition. It was his first experience as an engineer in passenger service and he liked it.
  • 1886
    Age 22
    They were married at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Jackson on November 25, 1886.
    More Details Hide Details They bought a house at 211 West Chester Street in Jackson, where they raised their three children. By all accounts he was a devoted family man and teetotaler. Jones went to work for the Mobile & Ohio Railroad and performed well and was promoted to brakeman on the Columbus, Kentucky to Jackson, Tennessee route, and then to fireman on the Jackson, Tennessee to Mobile, Alabama route. In summer 1887 a yellow fever epidemic struck many train crews on the neighboring Illinois Central Railroad (IC), providing an unexpected opportunity for faster promotion of firemen on that line. On March 1, 1888, Jones switched to IC, firing a freight locomotive between Jackson, Tennessee and Water Valley, Mississippi. He was promoted to engineer, his lifelong goal, on February 23, 1891. Jones reached the pinnacle of the railroad profession as a crack locomotive engineer for IC. Railroading was a talent, and Jones was recognized by his peers as one of the best engineers in the business. He was known for his insistence that he "get her there on the advertised" (time) and that he never "fall down": arrive at his destination behind schedule. He was so punctual, it was said that people set their watches by him.
    Since she was Catholic, he decided to convert and was baptized on November 11, 1886 at St. Bridget's Catholic Church in Whistler, Alabama, to please her.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1864
    Age 0
    Jones' tombstone in Jackson's Mount Calvary Cemetery gives his birth year as 1864, but according to information his mother wrote in the family Bible, he was born in 1863.
    More Details Hide Details The tombstone was donated in 1947 by two out-of-town railroad enthusiasts who accidentally got his birth year wrong. Until then, a simple wooden cross had marked his grave. Casey Jones's fame can almost certainly be attributed to the traditional song, The Ballad of Casey Jones, also known as "Casey Jones, the Brave Engineer", recorded by, among others, Billy Murray, Mississippi John Hurt, Pete Seeger, Furry Lewis, Johnny Cash, and played live by the The Grateful Dead. Songs titled Casey Jones, usually about the crash or the driver, have been recorded by Vernon Dalhart (Edison Disc recorded June 16, 1925), This Bike Is a Pipe Bomb, Feverfew (Blueboy (band)), Tom Russell, Leonid Utyosov, The New Christy Minstrels, Skillet Lickers, and the Grateful Dead. A pro -union protest song spoof of The Ballad of Casey Jones, written and sung by IWW union activist Joe Hill, titled Casey Jones the Union Scab portrays a negative version of Jones. Casey Jones is depicted as a selfish person, refusing to join the strike movement of the South Pacific Railway Company. As his engine is badly in disrepair he crashes from a bridge, dies and goes to Heaven, where St Peter wants him to break a strike of celestial musicians. But the scheme doesn't quite work: The rebellious musicians form a local union and threw Casey down all the way down the "Golden stairs", right into Hell where Satan urges him to shovel sulphur in the furnaces.The last and ironic line runs: "That's what you get for scabbing for the SP Line."
  • 1863
    Born
    Born in 1863.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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