Cathy Freeman
Australian sprinter
Cathy Freeman
Catherine Astrid Salome "Cathy" Freeman, OAM is a former Australian sprinter, who specialised in the 400 metres event. She became the Olympic champion for the women's 400 metres at the 2000 Summer Olympics, at which she lit the Olympic Flame. Freeman was the first ever Aboriginal Commonwealth Games gold medalist at age 16 in 1990. 1994 was her breakthrough season. At the 1994 Commonwealth Games in Canada, Freeman won gold in both the 200 m and 400 m.
Biography
Cathy Freeman's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Cathy Freeman from around the web
On a run for peace
Busselton Mail - over 3 years
BUSSELTON mayor Ian Stubbs has received an honour previously given to Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, Muhammad Ali, Desmond Tutu and Cathy Freeman.
Article Link:
Busselton Mail article
An Aussie finally Masters it at Augusta
Fox News - almost 4 years
Greg Norman almost couldn't stand to watch. The Great White Shark had circled around the elusive green jacket too many times without being able to wear it. Pam Scott was on the other side of the world, trying to catch every agonizing moment. Norman's close calls lurked in the memories of so many Australians on Monday. They woke up, nervously turned on the TV or radio or went online and discovered Adam Scott was still going strong at the Masters. No Australian had worn the famous green jacket, although Norman and Scott had been among the handful of Aussies to finish runner-up. Pam Scott was home with her daughter in Queensland state, watching her 32-year-old son on TV, knowing that generations of people were willing him on, desperate for another big fish in Australian golf. "We leaped in the air," she said. "We were sitting on the bed all morning from four o'clock and couldn't contain ourselves. It was just ...
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Fox News article
Aussie Alex gatecrashes finals fever party
Brisbane Times - over 4 years
Del Piero arrives, Australia already in love with ''The Little Painter'' ... ANZ Stadium hasn't had crowds like this since Cathy Freeman ... Sheens on the brink at Concord ... Secret Admirer hiding from nobody ... Heskey's coming, too.
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Brisbane Times article
Oscar Pistorius Revolutionizes Olympic Notions
Huffington Post - over 4 years
LONDON -- There are times when history only becomes clear with hindsight and others – rarer, more goose-bumpy – when you actually feel it being made. Oscar Pistorius revolutionizing our notions of what is possible with every clink, clink of his prosthetic legs on the London Olympic running track was one such moment. A double-amputee, tearing down the finish straight on carbon-fiber blades. You almost had to rub your eyes to believe it. Then again, Pistorius' gift to us all is that he has made this seem not at all strange. By running 400 meters in 45.44 seconds, Pistorius showed how absurd it is to think of him as "disabled." He's different to many of us. But with one lap of the track, he showed that is not because his legs stop just below the knees. Rather, with the 13th fastest time in a field of 49 sprinters from 39 countries, he proved he's an exceptional athlete. Exceptional not because he runs on blades. Just exceptional, full stop. "That's going to be his ...
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Huffington Post article
North Korea Refuses To Take Field
Huffington Post - over 4 years
GLASGOW, Scotland — London Olympic organizers mistakenly displayed the South Korean flag on a jumbo screen instead of North Korea's before a women's soccer match Wednesday, prompting the North Koreans to refuse to take the field for nearly an hour. The flag flap began during player introductions when a North Korean player was introduced along with a shot of the South Korean flag. The match against Colombia was delayed for more than an hour, and organizers apologized for the error. "Today ahead of the women's football match at Hampden Park, the South Korean flag was shown on a big screen video package instead of the North Korean flag. Clearly that is a mistake," organizers said. "We will apologize to the team and the National Olympic Committee and steps will be taken to ensure this does not happen again." The statement, however, included another gaffe: It failed to refer to the countries by their official Olympic names, causing organizers to reissue the state ...
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Huffington Post article
Trivia: Test Your Olympic Knowledge Part 2
Brandon Patch - over 4 years
From Michael Phelps winning eight gold medals at the 2008 Beijing Olympics to Nadia Comăneci receiving the first perfect 10 in 1976, there have been several unforgettable moments in Olympic history.  As hundreds of world-class athletes prepare to compete in the 2012 Summer Olympic Games beginning July 27, Patch is celebrating the start of the games by posting Olympic trivia questions all this week. Post your answers in the comments below. We'll post the correct answers in the comments by 6 p.m. today. Which author of the seminal book on baby and child care was also a gold medalist.  Dr. Benjamin Spock Dr. Michael Cohen C. R. Partridge Jane Mattes    2. How long is the route for the marathon event in the 2012 Olympics? 8 miles 11.2 miles 26.3 miles 40.6 miles   3. Who lit the torch to start the Games in Atlanta? Wayne Gretzky Cathy Freeman Muhammad Ali Ken Henry   4. What is the name of the mascot of the 2012 Games? Misha ...
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Brandon Patch article
Out of the void: Cathy finds her purpose
Brisbane Times - over 4 years
OVER coffee in her home town Melbourne, Cathy Freeman puts herself back in the mind of the 27-year-old woman she was on the night of September 25, 2000.
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Brisbane Times article
Nice stadium but something's missing: A cauldron. How will London hold the Olympic flame?
Fox News - over 4 years
London's Olympic Stadium is ready, with a pristine track, a well-manicured grassy field and rows of gleaming seats to welcome 80,000 fans. But one thing is clearly missing. Where's the cauldron that will hold the Olympic flame? Organizers usually keep back details about the Olympics' opening ceremony, including the flame lighting, to ensure the appropriate drama, so it's no surprise that they're being coy. But usually there is some structure — somewhere — that indicates where the flame will burn throughout the games. There is one tower next to the Olympic Stadium that could solve the mystery — the ArcelorMittal Orbit, a ruby red sculpture of twisted steel that looks like a smashed rollercoaster. Except that Olympic officials say this crazy sightseeing contraption won't be it. "No, it's not the cauldron," said Peter Tudor, the director of venues for the Olympic Park Legacy Corp. "I would know if there was a massive gas ...
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Fox News article
Olympic Torch relay pioneered at Nazi Games
Daily News Channel - almost 5 years
From classical Greece, mist clears to reveal white marble images in Myron’s celebrated statue of an athlete poised to launch a discus in the prologue to Leni Riefenstahl’s , “Olympia” remarkable documentary film. The sculptured Greek ideal of physical beauty with pictures of a shot putter, a javelin thrower and rhythmic gymnasts. Finally, flame floods the screen followed by a bare-chested runner embarking on the first torch relay of the modern Olympics. The relay footage is both haunting and disturbing like the remainder of Riefenstahl’s lengthy masterwork. In Greece the Olympia torch travels through Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Austria and Czechoslovakia to Berlin and the 1936 Nazi Games. It is a journey the German army was destined to retrace. Under the gaze of German Chancellor Adolf Hitler , Greece lead the 51 nations parading at the opening ceremony. During the inter-war years the flame, the five rings, the Olympic oath, the hymn and the anthems were products of the ...
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Daily News Channel article
The Top 10 Performances In Summer Olympics History
Midwest Sports Fan - almost 5 years
We are a mere three months and three days away from the beginning of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. To get you ready for this year’s games, here is a list of history’s ten greatest Summer Olympic performances. This year’s games will be the twenty-seventh Summer Olympics. There have been dozens, if not hundreds, of memorable and legendary performances in the history of the Olympics. The most difficult part of putting this list together was choosing only ten. And since this is an American site with a largely American readership, the list is heavy on American athletes and Olympic sports that get big ratings in the States (track and field, swimming, and gymnastics). Honorable Mention First, the honorable mentions: 1912, Stockholm: A Greco-Roman Wrestling match between Russia’s Martin Klein and Finland’s Alfred Asikainen lasts 11 hours and 40 minutes. 1948, London: 17-year-old American Bob Mathias wins the decathlon, becoming the youngest ever athlete to win a track-a ...
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Midwest Sports Fan article
Commentator's big call on depression - The Canberra Times
Google News - over 5 years
Instead, Hamilton watched Cathy Freeman's iconic race on television, recovering from the lowest point in his life. Ten years on, his career is back in shape. This weekend he will indulge one of his favorite passions, which just happens to also be his
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Google News article
We're on course, says happy Van Commenee with Games on horizon - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Mo Farah and Dai Greene will have to carry the burden of golden expectation into a home Olympics, as Liu Xiang did in Beijing in 2008 and Cathy Freeman in Sydney in 2000. Their prospects of emulating the latter, and ending up not just on the rostrum
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Google News article
Brock charity can't answer questions - The Age
Google News - over 5 years
But those interested must click from brockdakar.com.au through to the Peter Brock Foundation (PBF) site to the Cathy Freeman Foundation site. Phil Brock maintains that auditors have been looking at the PBF books, that the foundation may be wound up and
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Google News article
World Cup - Beale relishing licence to thrill - Yahoo! Eurosport UK
Google News - over 5 years
He is looking forward to following in the foosteps of Ella and the likes of athlete Cathy Freeman and rugby league player turned boxing world champion Anthony Mundine. "Obviously going into battle with other countries, I'm very proud to be indigenous
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Google News article
Pearson adopts Freeman as mentor - Ninemsn
Google News - over 5 years
Years after she adopted Debbie Flintoff-King as her mentor, Cathy Freeman has returned the favour for another champion hurdler - Sally Pearson. Freeman picked the brain of Flintoff-King - the Seoul Olympic 400m hurdles gold medallist - during her
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Google News article
YouTube Picks - The Hindu
Google News - over 5 years
There's also a piece on football creating awareness about landmines, and on Daley Thompson and a surfing project in Australia involving indigenous chidren. Other celebrities include Steve Waugh and Cathy Freeman. ... it's all about the power of sports
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Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Cathy Freeman
    FORTIES
  • 2014
    Freeman was appointed as an Ambassador for Cottage by the Sea, alongside celebrity chef Curtis Stone and big wave surfer Jeff Rowley. Freeman retired from her position as Patron after 10 years in 2014.
    More Details Hide Details In 2007 Cathy Freeman founded the Cathy Freeman Foundation. The Foundation works with four remote Indigenous communities to close the gap in education between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian children. Freeman was born in 1973 at Slade Point, Mackay, Queensland, to Norman Freeman and Cecelia. She and her brothers Gavin, Garth and Norman (who died after a motor vehicle accident on 16 September 2008) were raised there and in other parts of Queensland. She also had a sister named Anne-Marie (1966–1990) who suffered from cerebral palsy and spent much of her life in a home for the disabled. Freeman attended several schools, but was mostly educated at Fairholme College, in Toowoomba.
  • 2012
    Since retiring from athletics Freeman has become involved in a range of community and charitable activities. She was an Ambassador of the Australian Indigenous Education Foundation until 2012.
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  • 2011
    Freeman gave birth to Ruby Anne Susie March on 8 July 2011.
    More Details Hide Details She joined with actress Deborah Mailman on a road trip+, a four-part television documentary series Going Bush (2006) where the pair set off on a journey from Broome to Arnhem Land spending time with Indigenous communities along the way.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2008
    In 2008, Freeman participated in Who Do You Think You Are? and discovered that her mother was of Chinese and English heritage as well as Aboriginal.
    More Details Hide Details As a result of a 1917 Queensland policy that Aborigines could serve in the military if they had a European parent, her paternal great grandfather, Frank Fisher served in the 11th Light Horse Regiment during World War I. On her right arm, the side closest to the spectators on an athletics track, she had the words "Cos I'm Free" tattooed midway between her shoulder and elbow.
  • 2006
    In October 2006 Freeman announced her engagement to Melbourne stockbroker James Murch. They married at Spray Farm on the Bellarine Peninsula on 11 April 2009.
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  • 2002
    Later that year, Freeman began dating Australian actor Joel Edgerton whom she had initially met at the 2002 TV Week Logies. Their relationship ended in early 2005.
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    After her success in Sydney she took an extended break from the track to nurse Bodecker through a bout of throat cancer between May–October 2002.
    More Details Hide Details She announced their separation in February 2003.
    In 2002, she returned to the track to compete as a member of Australia's victorious 4 × 400 m relay team at the 2002 Commonwealth Games.
    More Details Hide Details Freeman announced her retirement in 2003.
  • 2001
    Freeman did not compete during the 2001 season.
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  • 2000
    Freeman was the home favourite for the 400 m title at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, where she was expected to face-off with rival Pérec.
    More Details Hide Details This showdown never happened, as Pérec left the Games after what she describes as harassment from strangers. Freeman won the Olympic title in a time of 49.11 seconds, becoming only the second Australian Aboriginal Olympic champion (the first was Freeman's 4x400 teammate Nova Peris-Kneebone who won for field hockey 4 years earlier in Atlanta). After the race, Freeman took a victory lap, carrying both the Aboriginal and Australian flags. This was despite the fact that unofficial flags are banned at the Olympic Games and the Aboriginal flag, while recognised as official in Australia, is not a national flag, nor recognised by the International Olympic Committee. Freeman also made the final of the 200 m, coming sixth. In honour of her gold medal win in Sydney, she represented Oceania in carrying the Olympic flag at the opening ceremonies of the next Olympics, in Salt Lake City, joining Archbishop Desmond Tutu (Africa), John Glenn (The Americas), Kazuyoshi Funaki (Asia), Lech Wałęsa (Europe), Jean-Michel Cousteau (Environment), Jean-Claude Killy (Sport), and Steven Spielberg (Culture).
    Her winning streak continued into the 2000 season, despite Pérec's return to the track.
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    She became the Olympic champion for the women's 400 metres at the 2000 Summer Olympics, at which she lit the Olympic Flame.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1999
    Freeman had a long-term romantic relationship with Nick Bideau, her manager, that ended in acrimony and legal wranglings over Freeman's endorsement earnings. Freeman married Alexander "Sandy" Bodecker, a Nike executive and 20 years her senior, in 1999.
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    Upon her return to the track in 1999, Freeman did not lose a single 400 m race, including at the World Championships.
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    She returned from injury in form with a first place in the 400 m at the 1999 World Championships.
    More Details Hide Details She announced her retirement from athletics in 2003. In 2007 she founded the Cathy Freeman Foundation. Cathy Freeman began athletics at the age of 2. Her first coach was her stepfather, Bruce Barber. By her early teens she had a collection of regional and national titles, having competed in the 100 m, 200 m, high jump and long jump.
  • 1998
    Freeman took a break for the 1998 season, due to injury.
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  • 1997
    In 1997, Freeman won the 400 m at the World Championships in Athens, with a time of 49.77 seconds.
    More Details Hide Details Her only loss in the 400 m that season was in Oslo where she injured her foot.
  • 1996
    By this stage, she was the biggest challenger to France's Marie-José Pérec at the 1996 Olympics.
    More Details Hide Details She eventually took the silver medal behind Pérec, in an Australian record of 48.63 seconds. This is still the sixth fastest time ever and the second fastest since the world record was set in Canberra, Australia in 1985. Only Sanya Richards-Ross has come within a quarter of a second of Freeman's time since. Pérec's winning time of 48.25 is the Olympic record and the third fastest ever.
    Freeman made more progress during the 1996 season, setting many personal bests and Australian records.
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    She also won the silver medal in the 1996 Olympics and came first at the 1997 World Championships, in the 400 m event.
    More Details Hide Details In 1998 Freeman took a break from running due to injury.
  • 1995
    Although a medal favourite at the 1995 World Championships in Athletics in Sweden, Freeman finished fourth.
    More Details Hide Details She also reached the semi-finals of the 200 m.
  • 1994
    During the 1994 season, Freeman took 1.3 seconds from her 400 m personal best, achieving 50.04 seconds.
    More Details Hide Details She also set all-time personal bests in the 100 m (11.24) and 200 m (22.25).
    Competing at the 1994 Commonwealth Games in Canada, Freeman won gold in both the 200 m and 400 m.
    More Details Hide Details She also competed as a member of Australia's 4 × 100 m squad, winning the silver medal and as a member of the 4 × 400 m team, who finished first but were later disqualified.
    1994 was Freeman's breakthrough season, when she entered into the world's elite for the first time.
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  • 1993
    At the 1993 World Championships in Athletics Freeman competed in the 200 m, reaching the semi-finals.
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  • 1992
    Also in 1992 she travelled to her first Olympic Games, reaching the second round of her new specialty event; the 400 metres.
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  • 1990
    She was then selected to represent Australia at the 1990 World Junior Championships in Athletics in Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
    More Details Hide Details There, she reached the semi-finals of the 100 m and placed fifth in the final of the 400 m. Freeman competed in her second World Junior Championships in Seoul, South Korea. She competed only in the 200 m, winning the silver medal behind China's Hu Ling.
    She moved to Melbourne in 1990 after the Auckland Commonwealth Games.
    More Details Hide Details Shortly after moving to Melbourne Nic Bideau, her manager, introduced Freeman to athletics coach Peter Fortune, who would become Freeman's coach for the rest of her career.
    In 1990, Freeman was chosen as a member of Australia's 4 × 100 m relay team for the 1990 Commonwealth Games in Auckland, New Zealand.
    More Details Hide Details The team won the gold medal, making Freeman the first ever Aboriginal Commonwealth Games gold medallist, as well as one of the youngest, at 16 years old.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1989
    In a competition in 1989, Freeman ran 11.67s in the 100 metres and Danila began to think about entering her in the Commonwealth Games Trials in Sydney.
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  • 1988
    In 1988, she was awarded a scholarship to an exclusive girls' school, Fairholme College in Toowoomba.
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  • 1987
    In 1987, Freeman moved on to Kooralbyn International School to be coached professionally by Romanian Mike Danila, who became her first coach and later a key influence throughout her career; he provided a strict training regime for the young athlete.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1978
    Her parents divorced in 1978.
    More Details Hide Details Freeman has described how she has been influenced by early experiences with racism and also by her Bahá'í Faith. Freeman was raised a Baha'i, and says of her faith, "I'm not a devout Baha'i but I like the prayers and I appreciate their values about the equality of all human kind". Freeman's mother Cecelia (née Sibley) was born in the Aboriginal community on Palm Island. Freeman's father was Normane Fisher; Normane was raised by his mother Geraldine Roy and his stepfather Claude Freeman. Freeman's late grandfather, Frank Fisher was an outstanding Rugby League player.
  • 1973
    Born on February 16, 1973.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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