Cecilia Muñoz-Palma
Filipino judge
Cecilia Muñoz-Palma
Cecilia Muñoz-Palma was a Filipino jurist and the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court of the Philippines. She was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Ferdinand Marcos on October 29, 1973, and served until she reached the then-mandatory retirement age of 65. While on the Court, Muñoz-Palma penned several opinions adverse to the martial law government of her appointer, President Marcos.
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Cecilia Muñoz-Palma's personal information overview.
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Christian Roots of the Family - Manila Bulletin
Google News - over 5 years
To give credit to whom it is due, I remember that it was the late Justice Cecilia Munoz Palma, who chaired the Constitutional Commission that drafted the 1987 Philippine Constitution, who was most responsible for the whole article on The Family
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QC to start building houses for responsible poor - Philippine Information Agency
Google News - over 5 years
Secretary to the Mayor and QC Task Force Housing chairman Tadeo Palma revealed that teachers, especially those teaching in Payatas like in Justice Cecilia Munoz Palma Elementary School, will be the first batch of beneficiaries of the socialized housing
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St. Scholastica's College has new president - ABS CBN News
Google News - over 5 years
Other distinguished names include Justice Cecilia Muñoz-Palma, the first woman justice of the Supreme Court; Carmen Dayrit-Padilla, the first woman president of the International Organization of Folk Arts; and Marie Antoinette Leviste, the first and
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QC might trim oversized classes - Philippine Information Agency
Google News - over 5 years
For the high school level, the Justice Cecilia Munoz Palma High School in Payatas registered the biggest class size with 74 students per class. Apart from considering the proposal, the QC government also intends to come up with a massive school
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Miriam twits Desierto, backs call for younger Ombudsman - ABS CBN News
Google News - almost 6 years
She cited as examples Justice Cecilia Muñoz-Palma who became the president of the Constitutional Convention and Justice Ameurfina Melencio-Herrera who became chancellor of the Philippine Judicial Academy
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Wasting wisdom - Manila Standard Today
Google News - almost 6 years
Former Chief Justice Cecilia Munoz Palma and Senator Eva Estrada Kalaw continued to be beacons of democracy in this country well until their late years. I have a number of friends and colleagues who are more than 60 today but are probably more
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AQUINO ASKS PANEL TO 'BE QUICK' IN PREPARING AN NEW CONSTITUTION
NYTimes - over 30 years
A 48-member commission gathered today to begin drafting a new Philippine constitution. President Corazon C. Aquino urged it to act quickly to restore a democratic basis to the nation's Government. The body named a former Supreme Court Justice, Cecilia Munoz Palma, as its president. Mrs. Palma, a longtime supporter of Mrs. Aquino, immediately
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PUTTING IT TOGETHER
NYTimes - almost 31 years
PRESIDENT CORAZON C. AQUINO dates her central ideas of politics and government to a sad, intimate, now- cherished time when she made weekly conjugal visits to her husband, Ninoy, during his years as a political prisoner of Ferdinand E. Marcos - years of seething in confinement while he became a legend among Filipinos. She listened closely in those
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GRUMBLING IN THE PHILIPPINES: CAN AQUINO GOVERN NATION?
NYTimes - almost 31 years
As President Corazon C. Aquino approaches the end of her second month in power, the euphoria of her victory has faded, and many Filipinos have begun to question her ability to exercise power and to make her Government work. Mrs. Aquino, who still appears in public dressed in yellow, as she did throughout her campaign, remains a popular and
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CHARTING AQUINO'S COURSE: PORTRAIT OF THE INNER CIRCLE
NYTimes - about 31 years
When Corazon C. Aquino is faced with a difficult decision, according to people familiar with her style of leadership, she consults with an inner circle of trusted advisers that includes members of her family, which has been involved in politics for generations, and a small number of opposition politicians and activists. Then, friends say, she will
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MARCOS FOES ARE HINDERED BY NEW RIFTS
NYTimes - about 31 years
A clash of personal rivalries has dimmed hopes for unity within the moderate Philippine opposition, to the evident delight of President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Reports of a shouting, finger-wagging confrontation between two leading opposition figures have led to recriminations and to predictions that Mr. Marcos may face two opponents in the election
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IN MANILA, OFFICIALS SEE LITTLE IMPACT, BUT OPPOSITION IS DELIGHTED
NYTimes - over 33 years
Early reports today that President Reagan had postponed his visit to the Philippines elicited little reaction from Government officials and relief from the opposition. ''It doesn't have any political impact on the Philippines,'' said a Foreign Ministry official by telephone. He recalled that President Jimmy Carter, during his Administration, had
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AROUND THE WORLD; Manila Activists Call For Gandhian Protests
NYTimes - almost 34 years
Four human rights advocates called today for nonviolent protests in the style of Mohandas K. Gandhi in an effort to force President Ferdinand E. Marcos to relinquish powers to decree capital punishment and indefinite detention for people said to be seditious or subversive. The presidential powers came to light recently in connection with petitions
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CIVILIAN RULE FAILS TO UNITE FILIPINOS
NYTimes - about 35 years
A year ago today, President Ferdinand E. Marcos ended 8 years, 3 months and 26 days of martial law and proclaimed a ''new republi c'' in the Philippines. The gesture brought tears to the eyes of the First Lady, Imelda Marcos, and approval from the United States. The lifting of martial law, it was believed, promised Filipinos the restoration of
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Cecilia Muñoz-Palma
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2006
    Age 92
    Muñoz-Palma died on January 2, 2006, at the age of 92.
    More Details Hide Details Three years later, the International Women’s Forum inducted her into its International Hall of Fame. Her family and friends formed the Justice Cecilia Muñoz Palma Foundation to “continue what she started,” and will be launched on February 2009. A street beside the City Hall of Manila was named in her memory. The City College of Manila also named a hall in her honor.
  • 2000
    Age 86
    She served in this capacity until 2000.
    More Details Hide Details Muñoz-Palma strongly denounced the circumstances that led to Estrada's vacation of the presidency and the assumption into office of Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo.
  • 1998
    Age 84
    However, in 1998, she supported Vice-President Joseph Estrada for the presidency.
    More Details Hide Details After his election, President Estrada appointed the 85-year-old Muñoz-Palma as Chairperson of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office.
  • 1987
    Age 73
    Following the ratification of the 1987 Constitution, Muñoz-Palma faded from the public eye.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1986
    Age 72
    When Aquino created the 1986 Constitutional Commission to draft the new Constitution, she appointed Muñoz-Palma as one of its members.
    More Details Hide Details The Commission would later elect her as its Chairwoman.
    After Aquino assumed the presidency in 1986, Muñoz-Palma called in vain for the retention of the unicameral Batasang Pambansa as the country's legislative body but such plea was not heeded by the new President.
    More Details Hide Details Instead, the President dissolved it by means of a proclamation, which formed a provisional constitution that declares her government to be revolutionary and assumed legislative powers the now former Batasan held.
    When Corazon Aquino was installed as President following the 1986 People Power Revolution, Muñoz-Palma was appointed chairwoman of the 1986 Constitutional Commission that drafted the 1987 Constitution.
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  • 1984
    Age 70
    After her retirement from the Court, Muñoz-Palma emerged as a prominent figure in the anti-Marcos political opposition. In 1984, she was elected under the UNIDO banner to the Regular Batasang Pambansa as an Assemblywoman, representing Quezon City.
    More Details Hide Details She headed for a time a National Unification Council that sought to unify all anti-Marcos opposition groups. She also became an early supporter of the attempt to draft the then-reluctant Corazon Aquino to run for the presidency against Marcos.
  • 1975
    Age 61
    As early as 1975, she had expressed skepticism that "a referendum under martial rule can be of no far-reaching significance as it is accomplished under an atmosphere or climate of fear." (Aquino v. COMELEC, G.R. No.
    More Details Hide Details L-40004, January 31, 1975, J. Muñoz-Palma, Separate Opinion) The following year, she voted against allowing Marcos the right to propose amendments to the Constitution by himself, and in doing so, ventured to call for the lifting of martial law itself. In a later dissent, she added that "under a martial law regime there is, undeniably, repression of certain rights and freedoms, and any opinion expressed would not pass the test of a free and untrammeled expression of the will of the people. That "(M)artial law connotes power of the gun, meant coercion by the military, and compulsion and intimidation" was so stated by President Ferdinand E. Marcos upon proclamation of martial law in the country."
  • FIFTIES
  • 1973
    Age 59
    In 1973, she again made history, this time as the first female Supreme Court Associate Justice.
    More Details Hide Details By the time she retired from the Court in 1978, Muñoz-Palma had become identified, along with Claudio Teehankee, as a dissenter from rulings that affirmed the decrees and actions enforced by her appointer, President Ferdinand Marcos, during his martial law rule.
    She was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Ferdinand Marcos on October 29, 1973, and served until she reached the then-mandatory retirement age of 65.
    More Details Hide Details While on the Court, Muñoz-Palma penned several opinions adverse to the martial law government of her appointer, President Marcos. After retiring from the Court, she became a leading figure in the political opposition against Marcos, and was elected to the Batasang Pambansa as an Assemblywoman from Quezon City.
  • 1968
    Age 54
    In the next few years, she was assigned as a judge to Laguna and Rizal until her appointment to the Court of Appeals in 1968, the second woman ever to be appointed to the appellate court.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1947
    Age 33
    She became the first woman prosecutor of Quezon City in 1947.
    More Details Hide Details Seven years later, she became the first female district judge when she was named a trial court judge for Negros Oriental.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1937
    Age 23
    The daughter of a congressman from Batangas, Muñoz-Palma earned her law degree from the University of the Philippines College of Law, and a Master of Laws degree from Yale Law School. She topped the 1937 Philippine Bar exams with a 92.6% rating.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1913
    Born
    Born on November 22, 1913.
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