Charles Lamb
English essayist
Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb was an English essayist, best known for his Essays of Elia and for the children's book Tales from Shakespeare, which he produced with his sister, Mary Lamb (1764–1847). Lamb has been referred to by E.V. Lucas, his principal biographer, as "the most lovable figure in English literature".
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Charles Lamb's personal information overview.
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José Alarcón Hernández - E- Consulta
Google News - over 5 years
Su obra más conocida es: “The Spirit of the Age”, publicada en 1825, la cual es una colección de retratos de sus contemporáneos, que incluían a sus amigos Charles Lamb, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, Lord Byron, Jeremy Bentham,
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All over the map - Calgary Herald
Google News - over 5 years
The political highway is an interesting analogy. The editorial purposefully assigns the centre line (politics that agree with the editor), soft shoulders (social conservatism) and ditches (NDP),
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Town mouse on Coleridge at Ramsgate - Country Life (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
'Such it is if Ladies will go gadding about with other people's husbands at watering places,' tutted Charles Lamb. They would come in autumn, but, even then, Coleridge found the water 'not cold enough to my liking'. His technique was to stand on the
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I'll Buy That For a Dollar: CCM Moves Morristown Location - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
“The new location includes all the latest in available instructional equipment and is a very warm, welcoming and accessible location for students to take CCM classes,” said Charles Lamb, director of the CCM in Morristown location
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Réduction des dépenses publiques : sempiternel leurre ? (10:00) - Le Post (Blog)
Google News - over 5 years
La participation ressemble au sou du franc qui induit nos domestiques à de gigantesques approvisionnements d'épicerie, ou encore, si l'on veut une similitude plus littéraire, rappelle l'invention du rôti de porc, telle que la raconte Charles Lamb
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Illuminations: Against The Duel: Part I - MobyLives
Google News - over 5 years
Neither did Charles Lamb or Charles Dickens, both of whom cited Fuller's description of the raptor. The fable and citation above is lifted directly from the Illuminations for Anton Chekhov's The Duel, and no, we're not launching a super nuanced counter
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Um giro por Covent Garden - Tribuna do Norte - Natal
Google News - over 5 years
Jane Austen e Charles Lamb, por exemplo, quando de temporadas em Londres, fizeram de Henrietta Street e Russel Street, respectivamente, suas paragens. Onde hoje é o Charles Dickens Coffee House (em Wellington Street) funcionaram por muitos anos as
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A Visit to The Lambs Club for High Tea - LifeGoesStrong
Google News - over 5 years
It opened in 1905 as a clubhouse for the Lambs, the first professional theatrical club in America, who borrowed their name from a similar group in London named after drama critic and essayist Charles Lamb. The opulent lobby is decorated in red,
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Cubist painting in a Monkstown gallery - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
The exhibition and sale also includes a painting titled Twins by Daniel O'Neill (€55000) and works by other artists including Colm Middleton, Mary Swanzy, Mainie Jellett, Charles Lamb, Harry Kernoff and contemporary landscape artist Ken Brown
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Cycle café Look Mum No Hands! presents The Great British Bunt-Off - Time Out London
Google News - over 5 years
... bike ride and classic games like lucky dip, guess the weight of the cake and splat the car. Once the winners have been declared, the bunting will be taken on a tour on London's fnest establishments, starting off at The Charles Lamb pub in Angel
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Critic's guide to going out this week - Irish Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Check out May Guinness's L'enfant, painted in 1905 in Paris at the dawn of Cubism; surrealists Colm Middleton and Alan Kenny; and the works of Mary Swanzy and Maine Jellett. And pieces by landscape artists Charles Lamb, Harry Kernoff and Jack Hanlon
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Making it all look simple in Galway - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
Also well worth seeing are Lamb in Connemara at the Galway City Museum, exploring Charles Lamb's sometimes romanticised view of life in the West, Lorg printmakers – including Sioban Piercy – at the University Hospital and 126 Gallery's day-by-day
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Once Upon a Time in Moberly for July 13, 2011 - Moberly Monitor Index
Google News - over 5 years
... Bill Rutledge, Gerald Early, Acting Scoutmaster Dick Boots, CO Robinson, Assistant Scoutmaster Ron Holbrook, John Blakley, Charles Stevenson, Ron Allen, Charles Fleming, Danny Mulkey, Bill Glassen, David Fleming, Charles Lamb, Steve Lee, Danny Holman
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Festive reopening for renovated Galway museum - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
An exhibition of art by the renowned Irish impressionist painter Charles Lamb has been mounted as part of the visual arts section of the arts festival. Lamb spent much of his life in An Cheathrú Rua from the 1930s to the 1960s
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Merging of Telford marked - Otago Daily Times
Google News - over 5 years
Mr Lambie also announced that Charles Lamb had accepted the position of director of the Telford Division. Prof Lamb is an associate professor and head of department of Lincoln's business management, law, and marketing department
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I read‚ therefore I am - Himalayan Times
Google News - over 5 years
Charles Lamb once said ,” I love to lose myself in other men's minds.... Books think for me.”That is exactly how I feel. If books are my meditation, libraries and bookstores are my heaven. There, I get lost in a different world, never knowing how fast
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Charles Lamb
    FIFTIES
  • 1834
    Age 59
    He died of a streptococcal infection, erysipelas, contracted from a minor graze on his face sustained after slipping in the street, on 27 December 1834.
    More Details Hide Details He was 59. From 1833 till their deaths, Charles and Mary lived at Bay Cottage, Church Street, Edmonton north of London (now part of the London Borough of Enfield). Lamb is buried in All Saints' Churchyard, Edmonton. His sister, who was ten years his senior, survived him for more than a dozen years. She is buried beside him. Lamb's first publication was the inclusion of four sonnets in Coleridge's Poems on Various Subjects, published in 1796 by Joseph Cottle. The sonnets were significantly influenced by the poems of Burns and the sonnets of William Bowles, a largely forgotten poet of the late 18th century. Lamb's poems garnered little attention and are seldom read today. As he himself came to realize, he was a much more talented prose stylist than poet. Indeed, one of the most celebrated poets of the day—William Wordsworth—wrote to John Scott as early as 1815 that Lamb "writes prose exquisitely"—and this was five years before Lamb began The Essays of Elia for which he is now most famous.
  • 1833
    Age 58
    A further collection called The Last Essays of Elia was published in 1833, shortly before Lamb's death. Also, in 1834, Samuel Coleridge died.
    More Details Hide Details The funeral was confined only to the family of the writer, so Lamb was prevented from attending and only wrote a letter to Rev. James Gilman, a very close expressing his condolences.
  • FORTIES
  • 1823
    Age 48
    His collected essays, under the title Essays of Elia, were published in 1823 ("Elia" being the pen name Lamb used as a contributor to the London Magazine).
    More Details Hide Details The Essays of Elia would be criticized in the Quarterly Review (January, 1823) by Robert Southey, who thought its author to be irreligious. When Charles read the review, entitled, "The Progress of Infidelity," he was filled with indignation, and wrote a letter to his friend Bernard Barton, where Lamb declared he hated the review, and emphasized that his words "meant no harm to religion." First, Lamb did not want to retort, since he actually admired Southey; but later he felt the need to write a letter Elia to Southey, in which he complained and expressed that the fact that he was a dissenter of the Church, did not make him an irreligious man. The letter would be published in the London Magazine, on October, 1823:
  • 1819
    Age 44
    On 20 July 1819, at age 44, Lamb, who, because of family commitments, had never married, fell in love with an actress, Fanny Kelly, of Covent Garden, and besides writing her a sonnet he also proposed marriage.
    More Details Hide Details She refused him, and he died a bachelor.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1807
    Age 32
    His farce, Mr H, was performed at Drury Lane in 1807, where it was roundly booed.
    More Details Hide Details In the same year, Tales from Shakespeare (Charles handled the tragedies; his sister Mary, the comedies) was published, and became a best seller for William Godwin's "Children's Library".
  • TWENTIES
  • 1802
    Age 27
    Lamb continued to clerk for the East India Company and doubled as a writer in various genres, his tragedy, John Woodvil, being published in 1802.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1797
    Age 22
    In 1797 he contributed additional blank verse to the second edition, and met the Wordsworths, William and Dorothy, on his short summer holiday with Coleridge at Nether Stowey, thereby also striking up a lifelong friendship with William.
    More Details Hide Details In London, Lamb became familiar with a group of young writers who favoured political reform, including Percy Bysshe Shelley, William Hazlitt, and Leigh Hunt.
  • 1796
    Age 21
    Fortuitously, Lamb's first publication was in 1796, when four sonnets by "Mr. Charles Lamb of the India House" appeared in Coleridge's Poems on Various Subjects.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1792
    Age 17
    In 1792 while tending to his grandmother, Mary Field, in Hertfordshire, Charles Lamb fell in love with a young woman named Ann Simmons.
    More Details Hide Details Although no epistolary record exists of the relationship between the two, Lamb seems to have spent years wooing her. The record of the love exists in several accounts of Lamb's writing. "Rosamund Gray" is a story of a young man named Allen Clare who loves Rosamund Gray but their relationship comes to nothing because of her sudden death. Miss Simmons also appears in several Elia essays under the name "Alice M". The essays "Dream Children", "New Year's Eve", and several others, speak of the many years that Lamb spent pursuing his love that ultimately failed. Miss Simmons eventually went on to marry a silversmith and Lamb called the failure of the affair his "great disappointment". Both Charles and his sister Mary suffered a period of mental illness. My life has been somewhat diversified of late. The six weeks that finished last year and began this your very humble servant spent very agreeably in a mad house at Hoxton—I am got somewhat rational now, and don’t bite any one. But mad I was—and many a vagary my imagination played with me, enough to make a volume if all told.
    On 5 April 1792 he went to work in the Accountant's Office for the British East India Company, the death of his father's employer having ruined the family's fortunes.
    More Details Hide Details Charles would continue to work there for 25 years, until his retirement with pension (the "superannuation" he refers to in the title of one essay).
    For a short time he worked in the office of Joseph Paice, a London merchant, and then, for 23 weeks, until 8 February 1792, held a small post in the Examiner's Office of the South Sea House.
    More Details Hide Details Its subsequent downfall in a pyramid scheme after Lamb left (the South Sea Bubble) would be contrasted to the company's prosperity in the first Elia essay.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1778
    Age 3
    Christ's Hospital was a typical English boarding school and many students later wrote of the terrible violence they suffered there. The upper master (i.e. principal or headteacher) of the school from 1778 to 1799 was Reverend James Boyer, a man renowned for his unpredictable and capricious temper.
    More Details Hide Details In one famous story Boyer was said to have knocked one of Leigh Hunt's teeth out by throwing a copy of Homer at him from across the room. Lamb seemed to have escaped much of this brutality, in part because of his amiable personality and in part because Samuel Salt, his father's employer and Lamb's sponsor at the school, was one of the institute's governors. Charles Lamb suffered from a stutter and this "inconquerable impediment" in his speech deprived him of Grecian status at Christ's Hospital, thus disqualifying him for a clerical career. While Coleridge and other scholarly boys were able to go on to Cambridge, Lamb left school at fourteen and was forced to find a more prosaic career.
  • 1775
    Age 0
    Born on February 10, 1775.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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