Charles Elliott Perkins
Charles Elliott Perkins
Charles Elliott Perkins was an American businessman and president of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. He was so well respected that historian Richard Overton wrote, "From the time that Charles Elliott Perkins became vice president of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy [1876 1876] ... until he resigned as president in 1901, he was the Burlington."
Biography
Charles Elliott Perkins's personal information overview.
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Tech's Johnson allows opposing D to pick its poison - FS South
Google News - over 5 years
I think all these guys can carry it. To this point everybody's kind of tried to take the B-Back away. That's fine. But when they don't I think you'll see David [Sims] or Preston [Lyons] or Charles [Perkins] one of those guys have a huge game
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Indigenous art overlooked - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
At 47, Perkins, a daughter of the indigenous activist Charles Perkins, has four children and is at the peak of her career. She has no new role to go to. Confirming the letter yesterday, Perkins said her resignation had been driven by a desire to
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Lyons, Greene upgraded for Georgia Tech - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Coach Paul Johnson graded them as doubtful on Wednesday. Both would play important roles if available. Lyons is the backup to starter David Sims and Greene is the No. 3 receiver behind Stephen Hill and Tyler Melton. Lyons' backup is Charles Perkins
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Lyons, Greene doubtful for Georgia Tech - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
That means, in all likelihood, that Charles Perkins moves up to No. 2 and either Daniel McKayhan or Chris Jackson move up to No. 3. (That's my second mention of Chris Jackson today.) 2. Guard JC Lanier and A-back Marcus Wright have been practicing this
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Perkins ponders a bigger picture outside the gallery - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
One is the trust she chairs, named after her late father, the activist Charles Perkins, for indigenous children and students. Another is pressing for the country's first institution devoted to indigenous art. It should be in Sydney, she says,
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Council facing land decision - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
Charles Perkins bought the land in 1905. It now sits in a trust held by four descendants poised to sell the site for $3.5 million to Angelo D'Emilia, a local businessman and the state representative for the region. Because Childs Bridge Farm has
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Is Richmond's anti-poverty initiative too ambitious? - WTVR
Google News - over 5 years
"If it wasn't for Social Security, I'd be in trouble," said Charles Perkins, "It's real tough... basically, there are no jobs." The former truck driver was forced to give up his job after 15 years because of physical limitations
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Paul Johnson Q&A - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Preston Lyons had a great one, he broke about two or three tackles when he scored and Charles (Perkins) bounced back from fumbling the ball and had a nice catch on third down and ran the ball. Richard (Watson) had a nice run there at the end
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Sims takes lead in Tech B-back competition - Atlanta Journal Constitution
Google News - over 5 years
Sims worked hard over the summer and rose from fourth on the depth chart behind Preston Lyons, Charles Perkins and Richard Watson to the top spot, for now. The order, though, is subject to change and the backs have been getting rotated in practice
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Coffee Bluff landmark to reopen - Savannah Morning News
Google News - over 5 years
Kruger and his wife Paula, partner Charles Perkins and grillmaster Joe Moore plan to stick with the barbecue theme. “We're stoked,” said Kruger, who acquired the business in 2009 and had planned to open last year before being badly hurt in an
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Ga. Tech's Sims making best of move from QB to RB - Houston Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
"Today for the first time Charles Perkins caught my eye," Johnson said. "He was humming out there. He had a good day of practice." But even the praise for Perkins turned into another compliment for Sims. "David Sims has really been practicing and today
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Law Firm Mark Twain Used Continues In Hartford - Hartford Courant
Google News - over 5 years
Outside of their professional relationship, Clemens makes clear in one letter dated 1885 his regard for Charles Perkins, whom he refers to as "an old personal friend and the best lawyer in Hartford." Friendship, says Philippon, was not something the
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More from Johnson, Sims - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
B-back Charles Perkins is starting to turn on the jets. David Sims churning up the waters in the B-back competition has brought out the best in Perkins, which is exactly what coach Paul Johnson wanted. “I think he's just playing harder, running harder,
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Johnson deems Tech practice 'suspect' - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Johnson did say a few players caught his attention, naming wide receiver Stephen Hill, B-back Charles Perkins and A-back Tony Zenon. B-back David Sims has been having a strong camp, Johnson said, and ”Charles decided to come along for the ride
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Watts, Perkins stand out in Tech practice - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Two players who caught coach Paul Johnson's attention: Outside linebacker Brandon Watts, who made plays in a one-minute drill at the end of practice, and B-back Charles Perkins, who made a couple good blocks. For Perkins, who is still learning the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Charles Elliott Perkins
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  • 1907
    Perkins suffered from Bright's disease. He became confined to his home shortly before his death, and died at his home in Westwood, Massachusetts, on November 8, 1907.
    More Details Hide Details The day his funeral was held, the entire CB&Q railroad came to a halt as a memorial to him.
  • 1901
    Charles Perkins resigned as president of the system in 1901 after New York City investors took control of the line.
    More Details Hide Details That year, James Jerome Hill, president of and the largest stockholder in the Great Northern Railway, won the financial support of J. P. Morgan for an attempt to take over the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. Hill's strategy was for his railroad and Morgan's Northern Pacific Railway to jointly buy Perkins' railroad. However, Edward Henry Harriman, president of the Union Pacific Railroad and the Southern Pacific Railroad, also wanted to buy the CB&Q. Harriman demanded a one-third interest in the CB&Q, but Hill refused him. Harriman then began to buy up Northern Pacific's stock, forcing Hill and Morgan to try to retain their majority stockholder status in the road by purchasing more stock as well. Northern Pacific's stock price skyrocketed, and the artificially high stock threatened to cause a crash on the New York Stock Exchange. Hill and Morgan were ultimately successful in obtaining more Northern Pacific stock than Harriman, and won control not only of the Northern Pacific but also the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. (Alarmed by Harriman's actions, Hill created a holding company—the Northern Securities Company—to control all three of his railroads. In 1904, in Northern Securities Co. v. United States, 193 U.S. 197, the Supreme Court of the United States held that Northern Securities violated the Sherman Antitrust Act. Hill was forced to disband his holding company and manage each railroad independently. The Northern Pacific, Great Northern, and Chicago, Burlington and Quincy would not formally merge until 1969.)
  • 1888
    As president of the system, he led the CB&Q through the Burlington Railroad Strike of 1888.
    More Details Hide Details Perkins was notably opposed to labor unions. In May 1886, he fired all known members of the Knights of Labor working for roads under his control. Now, Perkins also sought to eliminate unionization of workers on the CB&Q. He believed that unionized workers "owe allegiance to somebody else, and not to the railroad company that employs them." When the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen demanded that the railroad honor its work rules and implement a uniform pay scale that did not discriminate against newly hired workers, Perkins refused. The union struck on February 27, 1888, and 97 percent of the locomotive engineers and brakemen walked out (even though the union represented only 65 percent of the workers). Perkins hired strikebreakers to replace the workers who had walked off the job.
  • 1883
    But by 1883, members of the board of directors were pushing Perkins to start fostering industrial development along its tracks as a means of boosting freight.
    More Details Hide Details Perkins initially resisted, but over time adopted a policy of encouraging heavy industry to build along his system's rail lines so that they could become captive shippers.
    In 1883, Perkins took a secret trip over the StPM&M and reported to the CB&Q's board of directors that it appeared to be a well-engineered line which ran through excellent markets.
    More Details Hide Details Henry Davis Minot followed up with another investigation in 1884. In addition to seeking a lease of the StPM&M lines, Perkins also sought to build a line to St. Paul. The Minnesota legislature awarded the Chicago, Burlington and Northern Railroad (CB&N) a charter to build this line around the same time as Minot's study. But negotiations between the CB&Q's Boston investors and Hill dragged on. Hill was anxious for an agreement because the Milwaukee Road had already extended as far west as Fargo, North Dakota, and the Chicago and North Western Railroad was pushing west as well. The parties reached agreement on August 3, 1885, agreeing to buy large portions of stock in each other's company and placing Minot on the StPM&M's board of directors. Although publicly Hill denied existence of an alliance, Perkins authorized the CB&N to buy stock in StPM&m's depot subsidiary, leased StPM&M track between St. Paul and Minneapolis, and won the right to use the StPM&M's Minneapolis depot. The deal between the CB&N and StPM&M did not prove as profitable as expected, however, and Perkins was forced to absorb the former into the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. In 1889, Perkins led the system in constructing tracks across Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming so that it could link up with the Northern Pacific Railway near Billings, Montana.
  • 1882
    Perkins began seeking a way to add a line from Chicago to Saint Paul, Minnesota, in 1882.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1878
    In May 1878, Forbes ousted Harris and installed himself as president of the railroad.
    More Details Hide Details The Nebraska division merged with the CB&Q in 1881. That year, John Murray Forbes stepped down as president of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, and Perkins succeeded him. Because the railroad's biggest financial backers were located in Boston, Massachusetts, he moved to that city. Perkins was considered an "intelligent, forceful" railroad executive. He pushed for dual routes through market territories to keep his competitors out, created a highly regarded management team, and required that his railroad meet the highest engineering standards. During Perkins' tenure as president of the railroad, he bought up numerous other rail systems in order to expand his line's reach. These included the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, Omaha and Republican Valley Railway, Grand Island and Wyoming Central Railroad, Big Horn Southern Railroad, and Chicago, Burlington and Northern Railroad. In 1886, he expanded the line's reach to St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1879, James Jerome Hill and others formed the Saint Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway (StPM&M).
  • 1877
    While Perkins was vice president of the B&MR, the Great Railroad Strike of 1877 occurred.
    More Details Hide Details Realizing public opinion was against the railroad and that support for the strike was widespread among workers, he shut down the railroad's operations on July 24 and demanded that the system's property be protected by "constitutional authorities". Within two days, public opinion turned against the strikers, and the strike began to collapse when conductors returned to work that day. The fallout of the dispute with the Union Pacific led to a number of changes in the CB&Q. The CB&Q and B&MR became more closely allied, at the expense of the Iowa Pool. The Burlington was absorbed into the CB&Q in 1880. Perkins and Forbes then worked together to take over the Kansas City, St. Joseph and Council Bluffs Railroad and the Burlington and Southwestern Railway the same year. The Union Pacific was unable to reach an agreement with the Rock and O&N for more favorable freight charges. Instead, the Union Pacific reached an informal agreement with the CB&Q by which the Union Pacific would build a new rail line north of the Platte River, allowing it to control freight in the northern part of the state. The B&MR would control freight in the southern half. Perkins demanded that the board choose between himself and Harris.
  • 1876
    In 1876, Gould proposed that the Iowa Pool and Union Pacific jointly and perpetually lease the B&MR (depriving Perkins of his control over the road).
    More Details Hide Details Perkins and Forbes rejected the proposal, but Harris met with Gould and was so favorably impressed with the idea that he called for a meeting that would include Gould, Forbes, and Perkins. Meanwhile, Gould purchased enough stock on the Rock and O&N roads that he won a seat on their board of directors. Harris won over a majority of the CB&Q's board of directors, and Perkins did all he could to sabotage further negotiations. By June 1877, negotiations for the "Quintuple Contract" collapsed.
    In 1876, Perkins began lobbying Congress for legislation which would require railroads to charge shippers only for the actual miles traveled (a rule that would prevent the Union Pacific from charging higher rates, and thus drive it out of business).
    More Details Hide Details
    In March 1876 he was named the company's vice president, but continued to hold the vice presidency and superintendency of the company's business operations west of the Missouri River.
    More Details Hide Details
    He was so well respected that historian Richard Overton wrote, "From the time that Charles Elliott Perkins became vice president of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 1876... until he resigned as president in 1901, he was the Burlington."
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1875
    Forbes ousted Joy in 1875 and appointed Robert Harris as the CB&Q's new president—a move which led to Perkins' elevation to the road's vice presidency.
    More Details Hide Details Although the CB&Q eventually purchased another minor railroad to enhance its position vis-á-vis the other small Nebraska railroads, Perkins came to believe that Jay Gould (majority stockholder in the Union Pacific) was using the lure of B&MR traffic to cause dissension within the Iowa Pool.
    Perkins was named to the Board of Directors of the CB&Q in 1875.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1873
    On January 1, 1873, the railroad merged with the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy (CB&Q), but he continued to hold the position of president of the Nebraska division.
    More Details Hide Details This proved a difficult economic time for the railroad. The Panic of 1873 set off the Long Depression, a prolonged period of deflation and little economic growth which did not end until after the Panic of 1893. During the first several years of the Long Depression, the CB&Q neither acquired nor built any new track, although the parent railroad did absorb its Iowa division.
  • 1872
    He helped incorporate the Burlington and Missouri River's Nebraska division, and was named its director as well as director of the line's Iowa division. Perkins was appointed vice president of the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad in 1872.
    More Details Hide Details He was also named president of the B&MR's Nebraska division (a position he held until 1875).
  • 1865
    He was named Acting Superintendent and then Superintendent of the line in 1865.
    More Details Hide Details At that time, the railroad extended a mere, from Burlington to Ottumwa, Iowa.
  • 1864
    Perkins was married to Edith Forbes of Milton, Massachusetts, on September 22, 1864.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had seven children: Sons Robert, Charles and Samuel, and daughters Alice, Edith, Margaret, and Mary. Although he died and was buried in Boston, Massachusetts, there is a large memorial in Aspen Grove Cemetery in Burlington. The large marble obelisk-style stone is the largest in the cemetery, and sits near a bluff overlooking the main line of the original CB&Q railroad. Perkins was a director of other railroads as well, including the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad and the Kansas City, St. Joseph and Council Bluffs Railroad (both of which later merged with the Burlington line). He was also a member of the board of directors of the American Bell Telephone Company, whose headquarters were in Boston. Perkins is one of the most quoted railroad executives by historians of American railroads. Perkins owned a large estate in Burlington, named "Apple Trees." This mansion was once a museum to the history of the city, until 2006, when the city historical society moved into the vacated public library building. The mansion still serves as a museum, but in a much smaller scale than before. Perkins Park in Burlington, Iowa, was once part of this estate, and is named for him. The building that houses the Burlington Community School District Board, and superintendent's offices was a mansion that was built by Perkins, and given to his son, Charles as a wedding present.
  • 1860
    He was promoted to paymaster a year later, and then at age 20 was made Assistant Treasurer of the railroad in 1860.
    More Details Hide Details His rapid rise in the company's ranks was not surprising: His uncle was John Murray Forbes, the railroad's president.
  • 1840
    He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on November 24, 1840, to James Handasyd and Sarah Hart (Elliott) Perkins.
    More Details Hide Details His ancestor was Pierre de Morlaix, bailiff at Malvern Chase (the large forest which was the favorite hunting ground of Edward I of England). His ancestor Edmund Perkins emigrated to Boston, Massachusetts, some time before 1677. His father, James Handasyd Perkins, was a noted Unitarian minister in Cincinnati. Charles was the oldest of five boys. He drowned (it may have been suicide) when Perkins was a child. Charles Perkins was educated in the Cincinnati public schools, graduating from high school at the age of 16. He also received a portion of his education from Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts. When he was 16 years old, he moved to Burlington, Iowa, where he won a job as a clerk in a fruit store. When he was 19 he took a job as a clerk for the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad (B&MR).
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