Charles Kingsford Smith
Australian aviator
Charles Kingsford Smith
Sir Charles Edward Kingsford Smith MC, AFC, often called by his nickname Smithy, was an early Australian aviator. In 1928, he earned global fame when he made the first trans-Pacific flight from the United States to Australia. He also made the first non-stop crossing of the Australian mainland, the first flights between Australia and New Zealand, and the first eastward Pacific crossing from Australia to the United States.
Biography
Charles Kingsford Smith's personal information overview.
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What is the objection? - York Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
His request is like taking a poll to determine: Do we want Charles Smith to be sentenced for false pretense? That's ridiculous! There is a step by step process for that, and we do not determine guilt of high crimes and misdemeanors, or any other crimes
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Best NBA players from the University of Pittsburgh - Yahoo! Sports
Google News - over 5 years
Charles Smith averaged 16.8 points and 8.1 rebounds per game at Pitt from 1985 to 1988. He was then taken with the third overall pick in the 1988 NBA Draft by the Philadelphia 76ers, and immediately traded to the Los Angeles Clippers for Hersey Hawkins
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Chappell, Smith & Associates Partners with Keystone Insurers Group - MarketWatch (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Tom Chappell and Charles Smith purchased the agency in 1981. Tom Chappell is active in several local and national professional organizations, including the Aviation Insurance Association. He served on the advisory panel for the National Academy of
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Guest Column: Reason for optimism on mental health endeavors - Rockford Register Star
Google News - over 5 years
Dr. Charles Smith of Rockford is on the Mental Illness Awareness Committee of the Mental Health Association of the Rock River Valley. By Dr. Charles Smith The situation for people struggling with mental illness in Winnebago County should get the
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Fragile economy could reduce police awareness of wrongful convictions: Report - Montreal Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Marquardt was unjustly sent to prison for 13 years based largely on the testimony of discredited Ontario pathologist Charles Smith. Although police officers are more aware of the risk of wrongful convictions than ever before, today's climate of
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SFO and FMA lay charges in Belgrave Finance investigation - National Business Review
Google News - over 5 years
Former Belgrave Finance director, Stephen Charles Smith (43), and an associate, Raymond Tasman Schofield (49), have appeared in the Auckland District Court to face charges arising from the collapse of Belgrave Finance. The Serious Fraud Office (SFO)
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Stretch of interstate dedicated - Willows Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Charles Smith's granddaughter, Nichole Andrade, praised the Willows CHP office and, Henriques in particular, for organizing the memorial. "I'm very grateful to him for doing this for our family," Andrade said. Known by his friends as "Smitty," Smith
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Fort Pitt's Smith Likes Boeing, Honeywell and Telecom - Washington Post
Google News - over 5 years
8 (Bloomberg) -- Charles Smith, chief investment officer at Fort Pitt Capital Group Inc., talks about the outlook for President Barack Obama's speech about his plan to spur jobs growth, investment strategy in the current economic environment and some
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Newcastle Eagles set to re-sign legend Charles Smith - Journal Live
Google News - over 5 years
NEWCASTLE Eagles intend to add one more new face before the BBL season starts – as they finally wrap up a one-year deal to bring back long-serving forward Charles Smith. Smith, who with over 5000 points is the Eagles
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Witness who helped Jefferson investigators in murder probe is slain - NOLA.com
Google News - over 5 years
View full sizeSusan Poag,The Times-PicayuneA crowd gathers at 4th Street and Commerce Street in Bridge City as Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office deputies and detectives investigate the fatal shooting of Charles Smith. Charles Smith, 46, was found dead
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OK road ranks second fastest in nation - KFOR
Google News - over 5 years
"It's a fast road," Charles Smith said, who lives along 33. "Everybody's in a hurry these days. They put it to the limit and a little more, you know?" Because the 25 mile stretch of Highway 33 runs straight for as far as the eye can see, ranking second
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Andre De Shields to Direct Crossroads Theatre's AINT MISBEHAVIN - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
He has been nominated as "Best Leading Actor" for his title role in Charles Smith's new play The Gospel According to James, produced last Spring at the Victory Gardens Biograph Theater in Chicago, Dennis Zacek, Artistic Director
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Former Ark. hospital director gets new state job - Asbury Park Press
Google News - over 5 years
The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (http://bit.ly/ppl9NH) reports that Charles Smith has become the assistant administrator of the Arkadelphia Human Development Center. Smith resigned June 17, days after federal reviewers found the hospital violated
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Randolph County Man Indicted For Role in US Marshal Shooting Pleads Guilty - WDTV
Google News - over 5 years
On February 16th, 2011, Deputy US Marshal Derek Hotsinpiller, and several other officers were attempting serve a warrant to Charles Smith, 50, at 319 Central Street in Elkins. The indictment listed that Smith was wanted on charges of Possession with
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Police Academy star Charles Smith dead - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
The 66-year-old actor and former NFL star - who was best known for his role as Moses Hightower in the hit comedy movie series 'Police Academy' - was found by police yesterday afternoon after officers were called to his property
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C.B. Smith enters North Greenbush race - Albany Times Union
Google News - over 5 years
"The unexpected declination left us little time to recruit a candidate but we realized all along that we had the most honest, well equipped, committed and informed candidate here on our town committee all along in Charles Smith", said Town Democratic
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Charles Kingsford Smith
    THIRTIES
  • 1935
    Age 38
    His most famous aircraft, the Southern Cross, is now preserved and displayed in a purpose-built memorial to Sir Charles Kingsford Smith near the International Terminal at Brisbane Airport. Kingsford Smith sold the plane to the Australian Government in 1935 for £3000 so it could be put on permanent display for the public.
    More Details Hide Details The plane was carefully stored for many years before the current memorial was built. Kingsford Smith Drive in Brisbane passes through the suburb of his birth, Hamilton. Another Kingsford Smith Drive, which is located in the Canberra district of Belconnen, intersects with Southern Cross Drive. Opened in 2009, Kingsford Smith School in the Canberra suburb of Holt was named after the famous aviator, as was Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith Elementary School in Vancouver, Canada. He was pictured on the Australian $20 paper note (in circulation from 1966 until 1994, when the $20 polymer note was introduced to replace it), to honour his contribution to aviation and his accomplishments during his life. He was also depicted on the Australian one-dollar coin of 1997, the centenary of his birth. Albert Park in Suva, where he landed on the trans-Pacific flight, now contains the Kingsford Smith Pavilion.
    Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and co-pilot John Thompson "Tommy" Pethybridge were flying the Lady Southern Cross overnight from Allahabad, India, to Singapore, as part of their attempt to break the England-Australia speed record held by C. W. A. Scott and Tom Campbell Black, when they disappeared over the Andaman Sea in the early hours of 8 November 1935.
    More Details Hide Details Despite a brave search for 74 hours over Bay of Bengal by test pilot Eric Stanley Greenwood OBE their bodies were never recovered. Eighteen months later, Burmese fishermen found an undercarriage leg and wheel (with its tyre still inflated) which had been washed ashore at Aye Island in the Gulf of Martaban, off the southeast coastline of Burma, some south of Mottama (formerly known as Martaban). Lockheed confirmed the undercarriage leg to be from the Lady Southern Cross. Botanists who examined the weeds clinging to the undercarriage leg estimated that the aircraft itself lies not far from the island at a depth of approximately. The undercarriage leg is now on public display at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney, Australia. In 2009, filmmaker and explorer Damien Lay stated he was certain he had found the Lady Southern Cross. The location of the claimed find was widely misreported as "in the Bay of Bengal". However, the 2009 search was in fact at the same location where the landing gear had been found in 1937, at Aye Island in the Andaman Sea.
  • 1934
    Age 37
    In 1934, he purchased a Lockheed Altair, the Lady Southern Cross, with the intention of competing in the MacRobertson Air Race.
    More Details Hide Details He was unable to make it to England in time for the start of the race, and so flew the Lady Southern Cross from Australia to the United States instead; the first eastward crossing of the Pacific Ocean by aircraft.
  • 1933
    Age 36
    In 1933, Seven Mile Beach, New South Wales, was used by Sir Charles Kingsford Smith as the runway for the first commercial flight between Australia and New Zealand.
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    He later sold the aircraft to Captain W.N. "Bill" Lancaster who vanished on 11 April 1933 over the Sahara Desert; Lancaster's remains were not found until 1962.
    More Details Hide Details The wreck of the Southern Cross Minor is now in the Queensland Museum. Also in 1931, Smith began developing the Southern Cross automobile as a side project.
  • 1932
    Age 35
    Kingsford Smith was knighted in the 1932 King's Birthday Honours List as a Knight Bachelor.
    More Details Hide Details He received the accolade on 3 June 1932 from the Australian Governor-General Sir Isaac Isaacs for services to aviation and later was appointed honorary Air Commodore of the Royal Australian Air Force. The major airport of Sydney, located in the suburb of Mascot, was named Kingsford Smith International Airport in his honour. The federal electorate surrounding the airport is named the Division of Kingsford Smith, and includes the suburb of Kingsford.
  • 1931
    Age 34
    In 1931, he purchased an Avro Avian he named the Southern Cross Minor, to attempt an Australia-to-England flight.
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  • 1930
    Age 33
    He arrived in Sydney on 22 October 1930.
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    In 1930, he competed in an England to Australia air race, and, flying solo, won the event taking 13 days.
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    Collecting his 'old bus', Southern Cross, from the Fokker Aircraft Company in the Netherlands where it had been overhauled, in June 1930 he achieved an east-west crossing of the Atlantic from Ireland to Newfoundland in 31½ hours, having taken off from Portmarnock Beach (The Velvet Strand), just north of Dublin.
    More Details Hide Details New York gave him a tumultuous welcome. The Southern Cross continued on to Oakland, California, completing a circumnavigation of the world, begun in 1928.
  • 1929
    Age 32
    While on their way to help with the search two friends of Kingsford Smith crash landed in the Tanami Desert in Central Australia and died of thirst and exposure on 12 April 1929.
    More Details Hide Details The pair, Keith Vincent Anderson and Henry Smith "Bobby" Hitchcock, had been flying a Westland Widgeon plane named Kookaburra. Many sections of the media and public felt that the forced landing of the Southern Cross, which was dubbed the "Coffee Royal" incident after the brew of coffee and brandy which the crew had drunk while awaiting rescue, had been a publicity stunt and that Kingsford Smith was responsible for the two deaths. Despite him being exonerated by an official enquiry Kingsford Smith's reputation within Australia never fully recovered during his lifetime. The bodies of Anderson and Hitchcock were later recovered from the Tanami Desert. Hitchcock's body was returned to Perth for burial at Karrakatta Cemetery, while Anderson's body was returned to Sydney. Over 6000 mourners attended Keith Anderson's funeral. It was an elaborate affair befitting a national hero. Anderson was buried at Rawson Park, Mosman, on 6 July 1929. A grand memorial was later erected at the gravesite in his honour.
    On 31 March 1929, en route from Sydney to England, the Southern Cross with Kingsford Smith at the helm made an emergency landing on a mudflat near the mouth of the Glenelg River, in the Kimberley region of northern Western Australia.
    More Details Hide Details The Southern Cross was found and rescued after a fortnight's searching, with George Innes Beard, Albert Barunga and Wally from the Kunmunya Mission the first overland party to reach the downed aircraft.
  • 1928
    Age 31
    Kingsford Smith's flight was planned for takeoff from Richmond, near Sydney, on Sunday 2 September 1928, with a scheduled landing around 9:00 a.m. on 3 September at Wigram Aerodrome, near Christchurch, the principal city in the South Island of New Zealand.
    More Details Hide Details This plan drew a storm of protest from New Zealand churchmen about ‘setting the sanctity of the sabbath at nought’. The mayor of Christchurch supported the churchmen and cabled a protest to Kingsford Smith. As it happened, unfavourable weather developed over the Tasman and the flight was deferred, so it is not known whether or how Kingsford Smith would have heeded the cable. Accompanied by Charles Ulm, navigator Harold Arthur Litchfield, and radio operator Thomas H. McWilliams, a New Zealander made available by the New Zealand Government, Kingsford Smith left Richmond in the evening of 10 September, planning to fly overnight to a daylight landing after a flight of about 14 hours. The planned route was only just over half the distance between Hawaii and Fiji. After a stormy flight, at times through icing conditions, the Southern Cross made landfall in much improved weather near Cook Strait, the passage between New Zealand's two main islands. At an estimated out from New Zealand, the crew had dropped a wreath in memory of the two New Zealanders who had disappeared during their attempt to cross the Tasman earlier that year.
    After making the first non-stop flight across Australia from Point Cook near Melbourne to Perth, in Western Australia in August 1928, Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm registered themselves as Australian National Airways (see below).
    More Details Hide Details They then decided to attempt the Tasman crossing to New Zealand not only because it had never yet been done, but also in the hope the Australian Government would grant Australian National Airways a subsidised contract to carry scheduled mail regularly. The Tasman had remained unflown after the failure of the first attempt in January 1928, when New Zealanders John Moncrieff and George Hood had vanished without trace.
    At 8:54 a.m. on 31 May 1928, Kingsford Smith and his 4-man crew left Oakland, California, to attempt the first trans-Pacific flight to Australia.
    More Details Hide Details The flight was in three stages. The first, from Oakland to Wheeler Army Airfield, Hawaii, was, taking an uneventful 27 hours 25 minutes (87.54 mph). They took off from Barking Sands on Mana, Kauai, since the runway at Wheeler was not long enough. They headed for Suva, Fiji, away, taking 34 hours 30 minutes (91.45 mph). This was the most demanding portion of the journey, as they flew through a massive lightning storm near the equator. The third leg was the shortest, in 20 hours (84.15 mph), and crossed the Australian coastline near Ballina before turning north to fly to Brisbane, where they landed at 10.50 a.m. on 9 June. The total flight distance was approximately. Kingsford Smith was met by a huge crowd of 26,000 at Eagle Farm Airport, and was welcomed as a hero. Australian aviator Charles Ulm was the relief pilot. The other crewmen were Americans, they were James Warner, the radio operator, and Captain Harry Lyon, the navigator and engineer.
    In 1928, Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm arrived in the United States and began to search for an aircraft.
    More Details Hide Details Famed Australian polar explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins sold them a Fokker F.VII/3m monoplane, which they named the Southern Cross.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1922
    Age 25
    During the First World War, Ken Richards had been the observer in Kingsford Smith's plane in France. Later Richards moved to Cowra, New South Wales. Kingsford Smith owned an old Avro plane and in 1922 flew to Cowra to see his old comrade.
    More Details Hide Details Kingsford Smith and Richards flew under the Cowra traffic bridge. They also attempted to fly under the nearby railway bridge, but Richards fortunately noticed the telephone lines and pulled the aircraft away only seconds from impact.
  • 1921
    Age 24
    Applying for a commercial pilot's licence on 2 June 1921 (in which he gave his name as 'Charles Edward Kingsford-Smith'), he became one of Australia's first airline pilots when he was chosen by Norman Brearley to fly for the newly formed West Australian Airways.
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    Later Kingsford Smith worked as a barnstormer in the United States before returning to Australia in 1921.
    More Details Hide Details He did the same in Australia and also flew airmail services, and began to plan his record-breaking flight across the Pacific.
  • 1919
    Age 22
    On being demobilised in England, in early 1919, he joined Tasmanian Cyril Maddocks, to form Kingsford Smith, Maddocks Aeros Ltd, flying a joy-riding service mainly in the North of England, during the summer of 1919, initially using surplus DH.6 trainers, then surplus B.E.2s.
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  • 1918
    Age 21
    On 1 April 1918, along with other members of the Royal Flying Corps, Kingsford Smith was transferred to the newly established Royal Air Force.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1917
    Age 20
    In August 1917, while serving with No. 23 Squadron, Kingsford Smith was shot down and received injuries which required amputation of a large part of his left foot.
    More Details Hide Details He was awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry in battle. As his recovery was predicted to be lengthy, Kingsford Smith was permitted to take leave in Australia where he visited his parents. Returning to England, Kingsford Smith was assigned to instructor duties and promoted to Captain.
    Initially, he performed duty as a motorcycle despatch rider, before transferring to the Royal Flying Corps, earning his pilot's wings in 1917.
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  • 1915
    Age 18
    In 1915, he enlisted for duty in the 1st AIF (Australian Army) and served at Gallipoli.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1897
    Age 0
    Born on February 9, 1897.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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