Connie Chung
American journalist
Connie Chung
Connie Chung, full name: Constance Yu-Hwa Chung Povich is an American journalist who has been an anchor and reporter for the U.S. television news networks NBC, CBS, ABC, CNN, and MSNBC. Some of her more famous interview subjects include Claus von Bülow and U.S. Representative Gary Condit, whom Chung interviewed first after the Chandra Levy disappearance, and basketball legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson after he went public about being HIV-positive.
Biography
Connie Chung's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Connie Chung from around the web
Connie Chung: Bob Simon was a giant
CNN - about 2 years
Former co-anchor of the CBS Evening News, Connie Chung, speaks with Erin Burnett about her former colleague Bob Simon.
Article Link:
CNN article
What We Missed About The Nancy Kerrigan-Tonya Harding Scandal 20 Years Ago
Huffington Post - about 3 years
When I was a little girl, I adored figure skating. The flawless sparkly outfits, the graceful artistry and athletic technicality of the movements, and most of all, the skaters themselves -- specifically, Nancy Kerrigan. She was the perfect ice princess with her Vera Wang-designed costumes and her long, ballerina limbs, and she made every double axel and triple lutz she landed look easy. (Plus she had beautiful brown hair and her name was the same as my mother's, which to a girl under the age of 10 -- who also had brown hair -- made all the difference.) She was the symbol of a Cinderella comeback story. In 1994, just weeks before the winter Olympics, Kerrigan was attacked by an unknown assailant who would later be identified as a hitman hired by fellow skater Tonya Harding's husband Jeff Gillooly, and bodyguard Shawn Eckardt. Kerrigan recovered and won the silver medal. I was not alone in my early-'90s love for Kerrigan. Even before January 6th, 1994, the figure skater's star was q ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
The Young and Restless (in Radio)
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I often wonder when listening to radio, why there aren't more talk show hosts in their teens and twenties? Because I am young, I've realized age has become as much a barrier in an industry that's marginally a lot more seasoned. But perhaps that's why so many young people have retreated to online radio, stopped listening to the AM band and as statistics show, obtain most of their information on their own via the internet. AM radio does not have any young guns voicing the younger generation's concerns enough to connect them back to the AM band. In the 1970's and 1980's, many media market stations helped cultivate the generation of talent that was emerging to the forefront. Luckily, people like Connie Chung, Joe Franklin and Barry Farber created that same environment for me when they became my mentors. But because of consolidation and program syndication, by in large, many young up-and-coming talk show hosts do not get an opportunity to be cultivated the way they used to be. Instead ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
How About Some Rhee-lated Information From Tax Documents?
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I have been reading tax forms -- 990s, the form of the nonprofit organization (no 1040s for them). It might sound boring, but I guess that all depends upon whose tax forms they are. Two 990s are the subject of this post. The first is the 2011 (August 2011 to July 2012) 990 for Michelle Rhee's reform lobbying organization, StudentsFirst (SF). The second is the 2011 990 from the lesser-known SF sister organization, StudentsFirst Institute (SFI). Both forms were signed by Michelle Rhee on June 13, 2013 and filed with the IRS in Ogden UT on June 18, 2013. The Best of Both Worlds: 501(c)3 and 501(c)4 Both SF and SFI are nonprofits. However, SF is a 501(c)4, and SFI, a 501(c)3. A 501(c)3 is limited in the percent of its budget that it can devote to lobbying. (Violation of this restriction is the reason that Common Cause filed its whistleblower complaint with the IRS against the American Legislative Exchange Council [ALEC] in April 2012.) However, a 501(c)4 does not have such a restric ...
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Huffington Post article
Bobby Lee On Comedy, Survival And Being 'A Big, Sweaty Ball Of Flesh'
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Photo: LiveNation Being a comedian isn't always that glamorous. It's common knowledge that, for the most part, comics endure an excruciating ride professionally and emotionally. All those years of having to prove yourself--the highs, the lows, the gigs you get, the gigs you'll never get. Oy. Who needs it? But, take a look around at the comics that have actually made it, folks like Bobby Lee, for instance, and you'll find something rare--a captivating cocktail of vulnerability and strength with some tenacity chased back for good measure. There's also some dark comedy that may weigh a bit heavily on the soul of these creatures. Whatever it is, we keep coming back for more of ... Sarah Silverman, Lisa Lampanelli, Mo Collins, Daniel Tosh, Michael McDonald, Jen Kirkman, Jeff Ross, and Greg Fitzsimmons--to note just a handful. Lee fits nicely on that bill. For a Korean American guy that emerged out of La Jolla's Comedy Store back in the '90s, he found some glory--and longevity--on th ...
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Huffington Post article
Sue Rusche: Marijuana Legalization Proponents Deny Health Harms Just Like the Tobacco Industry Did
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Sooner or later, marijuana legalization proponents will have to take responsibility for grossly misleading the public about the health harms of pot. To persuade people to legalize, they have to perpetuate the myth that marijuana is harmless. Sound familiar? Denying harm is a tactic used by tobacco companies for 50 years to keep people smoking--and buying--cigarettes. Here's just one of thousands of examples: "Charges that smoking causes lung cancer and heart disease are outrageous and medically unsubstantiated," Anne Browder, assistant to the president of the Tobacco Institute which represented the tobacco companies, told the Miami Florida News in 1976. Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, credits his organization as the driving force behind legalizing marijuana, first for medical use and now for recreational use. He says legalization is a policy "grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights." His organization's website present ...
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Huffington Post article
Regina Weinreich: Ode to Girls: Girl Rising
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
The documentary Girl Rising -- the title evokes uprising -- mixes urgency with great storytelling appeal. The latest moment of the feminist revolution is not about debating issues of women's equality in the workplace. It is about changing the world one girl at a time through education. Coming just after the recent PBS series, MAKERS, a history of the recent phase of the Women's Movement in America in all its diversity, Girl Rising asks the question, how do we nurture girls to become "makers" of their own destiny? Taking its agenda global, Girl Rising addresses the dire subjects of girls' vulnerability -- to poverty, human trafficking, bonding which is a form of slavery, child marriage, and assassination for the simple desire to go to school. Filmmakers took the stories of nine girls, had them told by writers of their region, and voiced by well-known actresses: Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Selena Gomez, Kerry Washington, Salma Hayak, Alicia Keys, Priyanka Chopra, Chloe ...
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Huffington Post article
Eric Dezenhall: Why Managing Scandals Is Different Now
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Whenever a mess like the General David Petraeus affair blows up, I am asked by friends, acquaintances, students and journalists to handicap the state of play. The challenge is that no matter how hard I try, I'm lucky if I can get across one semi-cogent sound bite or bottom-line conclusion in most exchanges. What follows, then, are some observations you won't hear on cable TV about how crisis management has changed in the past thirty years - and not for the better. Change #1: Red-carpet fever: Publicity-seekers make bad crisis management clients. If crisis management is the murky art of making problems go away, what do you do when you have a client that is hell-bent for the red carpet? Just because you're in a picture doesn't make you Scarlett Johansson, but scandal subjects often hold two opposing objectives at the same time: Making the public un-remember the more unpleasant aspects of a controversy and holding on to pre-scandal ambitions. One of the characteristic ...
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Huffington Post article
Alan Wang: The Changing Face of News
Asian Week - over 4 years
Alan Wang Growing up in South Texas, Alan Wang didn’t have many Asian role models but from an early age he knew he wanted to be a voice for others like him.  After high school, Alan moved to Austin to study print journalism at the University of Texas and worked to build a craft at journalism.  Early into his career, a professor saw talent and encouraged Alan to not just be behind the page but in front of the camera. After years of traveling for work and reporting assignments in Laredo, Dallas, Fresno and Atlanta, he has settled in to become one of the most recognized news anchors in the Bay Area today   representing over 1.6 million Asian Americans. His role as an Asian American community leader prompted him to expose the Hepatitis B epidemic (a disease that disproportionately affects 1/10 Asians around the world and is directly linked to the Bay Area’s high level of liver cancer) and courageously talk about his own struggles with the virus.  Alan’s veteran experience and tenac ...
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Asian Week article
Rhee's StudentsFirst Names New, High-Profile Board
Education Week - over 4 years
At long last, the education advocacy group begun by former D.C. Chancellor Michelle Rhee has named a new, permanent board of directors. In addition to Rhee herself, the board members include: • comedian and school choice advocate Bill Cosby; • decorated television journalist Connie Chung; • Jennifer Johnson, an executive vice president and CEO for Franklin Resources, an investment-management organization; • former New York City schools chancellor Joel Klein, now the CEO of News Corporation's Education Division; • Roland Martin, a syndicated journalist, columnist, and CNN analyst; • Jalen Rose, an ESPN/ABC analyst, philanthropist, and former pro basketball player who helped to found a charter school in Detroit; • Blair Taylor, the chief community officer for Starbucks coffee and a former CEO of the Los Angeles Urban League. It's an interesting mix of folks, most of whom have been involved in various school-choice, civil rights, or educational endeavors. ...
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Education Week article
Jamison Doran: One of the Lucky Ones
Huffington Post - over 4 years
This is a rebuttal to Taylor Cotter's piece, "A Struggle of Not Struggling." First I want to start that I fancy myself a female journalist has-been, and my inspirations were not Harriet the Spy and Carrie Bradshaw. I am based in reality and count my early inspirations as Barbara Walters, Maureen Dowd, Gloria Steinem, Connie Chung, and I could go on and on. I would assume (and hope) most women wanting to get into the field of journalism look up to actual women working in that field and not unrealistic fictionalized versions. If Carrie Bradshaw is the reason you want to be a journalist, then you probably shouldn't be a journalist. When I read Ms. Cotter's piece, I was upset and more than a little jealous of the success she has found so early in her post-college life. When I was 22 and fresh out of college, I would have loved to have landed my "dream job." Instead, wanting to pursue a career in journalism, I took a job at tiny newspaper in a town of under 1,000 all the way ...
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Huffington Post article
The Brooklyn Artists Ball At The Brooklyn Museum
Los Angeles Guest Of A Guest - almost 5 years
img { border: 1px solid #CED1E5 !important; float: left; margin-right: 7px; margin-top: 4px; padding: 0 !important; } img.alignleft { display: inline!important; float: left!important; } img.alignright { display: inline!important; float: right!important; } img.alignnone { display: inline; float: none !important; } Go HERE for more photos by Daniel Reynolds and tag yourself and your friends! On Wednesday night, the Brooklyn Museum hosted their annual fundraiser, the Brooklyn Artists Ball, which celebrated the contributions of women artists and the 5th anniversary of the Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Over 1,000 guests turned out for an artful evening of cocktails, dinner, and dancing. After dinner, guests had the opportunity to explore the museum's newest installation, Connecting Cultures: A World in Brooklyn, as well as the Keith Haring and Rachel Kneebone exhibitions. For the occasion, the lobby was transformed into a dance floor, wher ...
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Los Angeles Guest Of A Guest article
Women Honored At Sackler Center First Awards
Huffington Post - almost 5 years
Yesterday 15 women were honored at the fifth anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum. The "firstees," as Toni Morrison called them during her speech, became "permanent members of the symbolic fourth wing" of Judy Chicago's 1970s masterpiece, "The Dinner Party." Each received a translucent glass "Dinner Party"-themed award created by Judy Chicago, who was in excellent form -- she wore a glittery pink, blue and yellow dress and sported rose-colored glasses. Gloria Steinem and Elizabeth Sackler presented awards to these remarkable women who took changes and broke through barriers in order to succeed in their respective fields. From art to finance, these 15 women all had grabbed at the bottom rung of the ladder and climbed all the way to the top. Steinem said, "It's the first celebration of firsts in the first feminist art center in the world." When the authority of these words sunk in, the audience erupted. Linda Nochlin received ...
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Huffington Post article
Forward Wins Five Ippies for Multimedia and Print
Forward - almost 5 years
The Forward took home three awards for multimedia as well as honors for best overall print design Thursday night in the Ippies contest sponsored by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. The annual Ippies competition pays tribute to excellence in journalism in the ethnic and community press in the New York City area. Nate Lavey, the Forward’s digital media producer, won both first- and second-place honors in the best video category. He won the top video prize for “Living Apart in Crown Heights,” in which he combined contemporary images and interviews and historical photos to tell the story of the racial tensions that led to the riots and how the neighborhood is faring today. He won a second-place video award for “Naming Mushky,” the story of thousands of girls in the worldwide Lubavitch Hasidic community who were named after Chaya Mushka Schneerson, the late wife of the Lubavitcher rebbe. The paper’s art director, Kurt Hoffman, received a first-place award for best overa ...
Article Link:
Forward article
Del Campo Alum, Lisa Ling Welcomed Back To Region
Fair Oaks Patch - almost 5 years
Traveling the world at the age of 18 as a reporter for Channel One News led television journalist and Carmichael native Lisa Ling to want to share people's stories with a greater audience, Ling said Tuesday in Sacramento. "For a girl from Carmichael who didn't have money to travel, those experiences were so rich," Ling said during her remarks as part of the Sacramento Speaker Series at the Community Center Theater. Ling, a 1991 graduate of Del Campo High School, was introduced by her former English teacher Jim Jordan. "I thought back then 'this young woman is going to run the universe someday' and in the (Del Campo) yearbook she was voted as 'the next Connie Chung'," Jordan said. "She is telling stories that need to be told and standing behind voices that need to be heard." Ling, who currently hosts a series on the Oprah Winfrey Network called Our America with Lisa Ling, spoke about her sister Laura, who was imprisoned in North Korea in 2009, and ultimately released thanks ...
Article Link:
Fair Oaks Patch article
Today in the SCV: Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011 - Signal
Google News - over 5 years
Gary Condit, D-Calif., interviewed by Connie Chung on ABC, denied any involvement in the disappearance of Washington intern Chandra Levy. (Ingmar Guandique, an illegal immigrant from El Salvador, was convicted in Nov. 2010 of murdering Levy,
Article Link:
Google News article
Democratic Party Reports Slow Fundraising In July - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
The most notable names from the new batch of max-out donors include television personality couple Maury Povich and Connie Chung, three members of the Tisch family, which own Loews Corporation, and Maria Cuomo Cole, brother to current New York Governor
Article Link:
Google News article
12 killed in plane crash in northern Canada - CNN (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But she won't talk about it anymore than Connie Chung will. "It" being what's not talked about, not even here. Any posting of "it" is met with personal attacks here. I guess some people just spaz-out when they hear what's not told on TV
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Connie Chung
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 64
    Chung was a judge for the Miss Universe 2011 contest.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 2006
    Age 59
    On the June 27, 2006 episode of The Tonight Show, Jay Leno interviewed Chung about her "Thanks for the Memory" parody.
    More Details Hide Details During the interview, Chung poked fun at her show's low ratings, referring to the musical number as a "private joke for our two viewers". Chung accepted a teaching fellowship at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. While at Harvard, she wrote a discussion paper titled The Business of Getting "The Get": Nailing an Exclusive Interview in Prime Time.
    In January 2006, Chung and Maury Povich began hosting a show titled Weekends with Maury and Connie on MSNBC.
    More Details Hide Details It was Chung's first appearance as a television host since 2003. The show was later canceled and aired its final episode on June 17, 2006. On this episode, Chung, dressed in a white evening gown and dancing atop a black piano, sang a parody to the tune of "Thanks for the Memory". Video clips of the bizarre, off-key farewell performance circulated on internet video sites. Connie herself commented, "All I want to be sure of is that viewers understood it was a giant self-parody. If anyone took it seriously, they really need to get a life."
  • 2002
    Age 55
    In July 2002 Chung interviewed tennis legend Martina Navratilova, who at that point had been a naturalized U.S. citizen for more than 20 years, about her recent criticisms of the U.S. political system.
    More Details Hide Details Chung labelled these criticisms "un-American" and "unpatriotic", and suggested Navratilova should "go back to Czechoslovakia" rather than use her celebrity status to gain a platform for her complaints. When Navratilova asked why it was unpatriotic to speak out, Chung replied, "Well, you know the old line, love it or leave it."
  • FORTIES
  • 1995
    Age 48
    A few months later, in the wake of the April 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, Chung was widely criticized for sarcasm as she asked an Oklahoma City Fire Department spokesman, "Can the Oklahoma City Fire Department handle this?" Many Oklahomans felt the question was insensitive to the situation.
    More Details Hide Details For instance, a few women created "Bite Me, Connie Chung" shirts in response to the interview. Thousands of viewers in Oklahoma and elsewhere called and wrote letters of protest over the tone of the questions. Moreover, co-anchor Dan Rather was irate that Chung was sent from New York to the assignment while he was already in nearby Texas. Consequently, after public outcry, and Rather's complaints, Chung was laid off as co-anchor of the CBS Evening News and was offered a demotion to weekend anchor or morning anchor. Chung left the network after being removed as Co-Anchor of CBS Evening News. After making the jump to ABC News as a co-host of the Monday edition of 20/20 alongside Charles Gibson, she conducted an interview with Gary Condit, focusing on his relationship with murdered Washington, D.C. intern Chandra Levy. She was a guest host of the morning program Good Morning America. After short-lived host Lisa McRee left the program, Chung declined to take over on a permanent basis, saying she did not want to broadcast 10 hours a week in the early morning hours.
    In a January 5, 1995, interview with Kathleen Gingrich, mother of Republican politician Newt Gingrich, on Eye to Eye, Mrs. Gingrich said she could not say what her son thought about First Lady Hillary Clinton on the air.
    More Details Hide Details Chung asked Mrs. Gingrich to "just whisper it to me, just between you and me," and Mrs. Gingrich replied that her son thought of Clinton as a "bitch." Many people interpreted Chung's suggestion that if Mrs. Gingrich would whisper this statement it would be promised that the statement would be off the record. Bill Carter for the New York Times reported, "Ms. Chung had become the object of some of the most ferocious criticism, justified or not, ever directed at any network anchor as a result of her now infamous interview with Speaker Newt Gingrich's mother, Kathleen." The interview was also parodied on Saturday Night Live.
    After her unsuccessful co-anchoring stint with Dan Rather ended in 1995, Chung jumped to ABC News where she co-hosted the Monday edition of 20/20 with Charles Gibson and began independent interviews, a field which would soon become her trademark.
    More Details Hide Details Chung's interviews were largely gentle, but often they were punctuated by a rapid-fire barrage of sharp questions. Despite this, her interviews were still widely recognized as being decidedly softer than those of other interviewers, such as Barbara Walters or Mike Wallace. Consequently, her interviews were often used as a public relations move by those looking to overcome scandal or controversy. Some of her more famous interview subjects include Claus von Bülow and U.S. Representative Gary Condit, whom Chung interviewed first after the Chandra Levy disappearance. Chung was the first journalist to interview basketball legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson after he went public about being HIV-positive.
    In 1995, she was removed as CBS Evening News co-anchor after a controversial interview with a fireman, during rescue efforts at the Oklahoma City bombing, which seemed inappropriately combative and her interview tactics to get Newt Gingrich's mother to admit her unguarded thoughts about Hillary Clinton.
    More Details Hide Details She is married to talk show host Maury Povich and they have one adopted son, Matthew Jay Povich. The youngest of five children, Chung was born and raised in Washington, D.C. less than a year after her family immigrated. Her father, William Ling Chung, was an intelligence officer in the Chinese Nationalist Government.
  • 1993
    Age 46
    Chung left NBC for CBS where she hosted Saturday Night with Connie Chung, and on June 1, 1993, she became the second woman (after Barbara Walters with ABC in 1976) to co-anchor a major network's national news broadcast (the first solo national news anchor title in the United States goes to Katie Couric at CBS).
    More Details Hide Details While hosting the CBS Evening News, Chung also hosted a side project on CBS, Eye to Eye with Connie Chung.
  • 1991
    Age 44
    Chung announced that she was reducing her workload in 1991 in the hopes of getting pregnant.
    More Details Hide Details Together, they have one son, Matthew, whom they adopted on June 20, 1995. Chung was a Washington-based correspondent for the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite in the early 1970s, during the Watergate political scandal. Later, Chung left to anchor evening newscasts for KNXT (now KCBS-TV), the network's owned and operated station in Los Angeles. Chung also anchored the network's primetime news updates (CBS Newsbreak) for West Coast stations from the KNXT studios at Columbia Square during her tenure there. In 1983 Chung returned to network news as NBC created a new early program, NBC News at Sunrise, which was scheduled as the lead-in to the Today program. Later, NBC created American Almanac, which she co-hosted with Roger Mudd, after he left NBC Nightly News where he had co-anchored for two years with Tom Brokaw.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1969
    Age 22
    She graduated from Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, Maryland and went on to receive a degree in journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park in 1969.
    More Details Hide Details She has been married to talk show host Maury Povich since 1984. Chung converted to Judaism upon her marriage to Povich. Chung has become devoted to the faith, and attends synagogue with her family. Chung has noted publicly that she and Povich maintain a kosher lifestyle year round.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1946
    Born
    Born on August 20, 1946.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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