Constance Talmadge
American actress
Constance Talmadge
Constance Talmadge was a silent movie star born in Brooklyn, New York, USA, and was the sister of fellow actresses Norma Talmadge and Natalie Talmadge.
Biography
Constance Talmadge's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Constance Talmadge
News
News abour Constance Talmadge from around the web
Ronald Colman Movie Schedule: LOST HORIZON, HER NIGHT OF ROMANCE, RAFFLES - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Constance Talmadge, Ronald Colman, Jean Hersholt. BW-85 mins. 2:00 AM LOST HORIZON (1937) Four fugitives from a Chinese revolution discover a lost world of peace and harmony. Dir: Frank Capra. Cast: Ronald Colman, Jane Wyatt, Edward Everett
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Google News article
DVDS; An Independent Woman, Nobly Suffering in Silents
NYTimes - about 7 years
SHE was perhaps the biggest female star of the silent era. Her dark, depthless eyes gazed from the covers of influential fan magazines, projecting a nobly suppressed pain and longing; in the stories inside, she -- or her ghost writers -- advised the emerging independent American women of the 1920s on matters of fashion and home décor. She
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NYTimes article
The Listings: Movies
NYTimes - about 7 years
Ratings and running times are in parentheses; foreign films have English subtitles. Full reviews of all current releases, movie trailers, showtimes and tickets: nytimes.com/movies. 'AJAMI' (No rating, 2:00, in Arabic and Hebrew) This Israeli nominee for the 2010 Oscars is a tough, multistranded crime drama set in a mostly Arab neighborhood of
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NYTimes article
PROPERTY VALUES; What You Get for ... $1 Million
NYTimes - over 8 years
Chicago WHAT: A three-bedroom 2,627-square-f00t brick Victorian with two full and two half baths, built in 1889 on a 31-foot-wide lot HOW MUCH: $1,075,000 PER SQUARE FOOT: $355.14 SETTING: After years as an area for farming celery -- a crop amenable to sandy soil -- the Lakeview area of Chicago first became popular in the 19th century among
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Louder Than Words
NYTimes - over 17 years
SILENT STARS By Jeanine Basinger. Illustrated. 497 pp. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. $35. CELEBRITY, as Andy Warhol understood, is not necessarily related to achievement or depth. It just is -- not like a poem but like a silk-screened can of Campbell's soup. In that sense, Jeanine Basinger's fascinating, evocative and at times provocatively
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NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - about 18 years
A sophisticated comedy, a graphic World War II story, a milestone of the silent screen and a tense melodrama are among the highlights of this week's films on television. Danny Kaye is in top form as a royal scapegoat in Norman Panama's COURT JESTER (1956). Set in Old England, this smooth spoof of knights and derring-do dispatches the comedian in
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NYTimes article
PHOTOGRAPHY VIEW; Advertisements for the Insecure, Unreal Self
NYTimes - almost 24 years
Hollywood declared 1992 the year of the woman, but the best female role of the year was played by a man. Go figure. As for ordinary women, the cinema has been important in determining their roles, too, with strong assists from fashion magazines and advertising. But since television arrived, advertising has probably become the most influential
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NYTimes article
Lillian Gish, 99, a Movie Star Since Movies Began, is Dead
NYTimes - about 24 years
Lillian Gish, the last of the great silent film stars, who performed for more than 85 years in movies, theater and television, died in her sleep on Saturday evening at her home in Manhattan. She was 99 years old. Her personal manager, James E. Frasher, said the cause was heart failure. "She was the same age as film," Mr. Frasher said. "They both
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NYTimes article
Books of The Times; Centenary for Author of an Indubitable Classic
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: Anita Loos A Biography By Gary Carey Illustrated. 331 pages. Alfred A.Knopf. $24.95. Anita Loos A Biography By Gary Carey Illustrated. 331 pages. Alfred A.Knopf. $24.95. Anita Loos would have been 100 this year, though if she were still around she might well have persuaded us all that she was only 90. In old age she published two volumes of
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Series of Silent Films Continues at St. John's
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: ''The Passion of Joan of Arc'' (1928), directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer and starring Marie Falconetti, is to be shown Thursday at 8 P.M. at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, Amsterdam Avenue and 112th Street, as part of its continuing summer series of silent films. ''The Passion of Joan of Arc'' (1928), directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer and
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Verdict Expected to Focus Attention on Early Tobacco Ads
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: A New Jersey jury's verdict that the Liggett Group was liable for a smoker's death because its advertising promoted tobacco's healthfulness will serve notice to all tobacco companies that they are responsible for their early advertising claims, according to several experts on tobacco marketing. Many of these ads use statements about health,
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NYTimes article
IDEAS & TRENDS; Understanding the Dream World of Cigarette Ads
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: The magazine advertisement is starkly beautiful: a woman with full, open lips holds a bar of melting ice to her neck, as water streams onto her naked shoulder. Embedded in the ice, in shimmering green letters, is the word ''Salem.'' The magazine advertisement is starkly beautiful: a woman with full, open lips holds a bar of melting ice to her
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POETS OF PACKAGING, SCULPTORS OF DESIRE
NYTimes - almost 33 years
THE MIRROR MAKERS A History of American Advertising and Its Creators. By Stephen Fox. Illustrated. 383 pp. New York: William Morrow & Co. $17.95. ADVERTISING has always been the Peck's Bad Boy of American business. Unlike most goods and other services, which tend to be taken seriously, its products are words and pictures, urging us to buy things we
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ANITA LOOS DEAD AT 93; SCREENWRITER, NOVELIST
NYTimes - over 35 years
Anita Loos, the screenwriter, playwright and novelist whose name was indissolubly linked with her book ''Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,'' died last night at Doctors Hospital in Manhattan. She was 93 years old. Miss Loos was admitted to the hospital Monday night after suffering a heart attack, according to her physician, Dr. Shepard G. Aronson. He said
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Constance Talmadge
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1973
    Age 74
    Died on November 23, 1973.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1929
    Age 30
    With the advent of talkies in 1929, Talmadge left Hollywood.
    More Details Hide Details Her sister Norma did make a handful of appearances in talking films, but for the most part the three sisters retired all together, investing in real estate and other business ventures. Only a few of her films survive today. Like her sister Norma, Talmadge succumbed to substance abuse and alcoholism later in life. She also had many failed affairs and relationships. She was married four times; all the unions were childless: Talmadge's mother fostered the belief she might one day return to films. “Success and fame cast a spell that can never been quite shaken off,” her mother pointed out in her autobiography. “A woman, because of her love, may say, and in the fervor of the moment believe, that she is ready to give up her chosen work. But there is sure to come a time when keen longing and strong regret for her lost career dominate over the more placid contentments of love and marriage. Then unhappiness and friction ensue.”
  • TWENTIES
  • 1920
    Age 21
    When Talmadge was asked by a writer for Green Book Magazine what sort of stories she wanted to do in 1920, she said: "Although no less than sixty manuscripts are submitted to me every week, it is exceedingly difficult to get exactly the kind of comedy I especially want.
    More Details Hide Details I want comedies of manners, comedies that are funny because they delight one’s sense of what is ridiculously human in the way of little everyday commonplace foibles and frailties – subtle comedies, not comedies of the slap stick variety." "I enjoy making people laugh. Secondly, because this type of work comes easiest and most naturally to me, I am not a highly emotional type. My sister could cry real tears over two sofa cushions stuffed into a long dress and white lace cap, to look like a dead baby, and she would do it so convincingly that 900 persons out front would weep with her. That is real art, but my kind of talent would lead me to bounce that padded baby up and down on my knee with absurd grimaces that would make the same 900 roar with laughter. "You see, in my way, I take my work quite as seriously as my sister does hers – I would be just as in earnest about making the baby seem ridiculous as she would about making it seem real. I am not fitted to be a vamp type. There is nothing alluring, or exotic, or erotic, or neurotic about me. I could not pull the vamp stuff to save my life, but if I am assigned a vamp role in a comedy, and I had such a part in my fourth First National picture, In Search of a Sinner.
  • 1919
    Age 20
    So popular was Talmadge's portrayal of the tomboyish Mountain Girl, Griffith released in 1919 the Babylonian sequence from Intolerance as a new, separate film called The Fall of Babylon.
    More Details Hide Details He refilmed her death scene to allow for a happy ending. Her friend Anita Loos, who wrote many screenplays for her, appreciated her "humour and her irresponsible way of life". Over the course of her career, Talmadge appeared in more than 80 films, often in comedies like A Pair of Silk Stockings (1918), Happiness à la Mode (1919), Romance and Arabella (1919), Wedding Bells (1921) and The Primitive Lover (1922). Talmadge, along with her sisters, was heavily billed during her early career. According to her 1923 Blue Book of the Screen biography, she was "5'5" tall, 120 lbs, with blonde hair and brown eyes, was an outdoor girl who loved activities."
  • TEENAGE
  • 1914
    Age 15
    She began making films in 1914, in a Vitagraph comedy short, In Bridal Attire (1914).
    More Details Hide Details Her first major role was as The Mountain Girl and Marguerite de Valois in D.W. Griffith's Intolerance (1916). Griffith re-edited Intolerance repeatedly after its initial release, and even shot new scenes long after it was in distribution. Grace Kingsley found Talmadge in her dressing room at the Fine Arts Studio, in Los Angeles, in the midst of making up for some new shots. "Did you really drive those galloping brutes of horses?" asked Kingsley. "Indeed I did," said Talmadge. "Two women sat behind me at the Auditorium the other night. They said, 'Of course she never really drove those horses herself. Somebody doubled for her.' Know what I did? I turned around and told them, 'I wish I could show you my knees, all black and blue even yet from being cracked up against the dashboard of that chariot!'"
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1898
    Born
    Constance was born on April 19, 1898 in Brooklyn, New York to poor parents, Fred and Peg Talmadge.
    More Details Hide Details Her father was an alcoholic, and left them when she was still very young. Her mother made a living by doing laundry. When a friend recommended that Constance's mother use older sister Norma as a model for title slides in flickers, which were shown in early nickelodeons, Peg decided to do so. This led all three sisters into an acting career.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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