Edwina Burma
aristocrat
Edwina Burma
Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, GBE, DCVO, CI, DStJ was an English heiress, socialite, relief-worker, wife of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, and last Vicereine of India.
Biography
Edwina Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma's personal information overview.
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News
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India Hicks talks royals, jewels and lice - Globe and Mail
Google News - over 5 years
My mother [Pamela Hicks, daughter of Earl and Countess Mountbatten of Burma] inherited an amazing collection of fine jewellery from her mother and grandmother. And my father was once commissioned by the French house of Chaumet to bring to life his own
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'Mae Naak' poised to invade UK - Bangkok Post
Google News - over 5 years
Countess Mountbatten will preside over the tour's opening at Southwark Cathedral, with the Siam Philharmonic Orchestra performing in collaboration with the Fairhaven Choir of Cambridge. The Bloomsbury Theatre performance will also feature Tosca,
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Fashion royalty at Elton John's White Tie and Tiara Ball 2011 - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Aristo-model and interior designer , India Hicks dazzled in a one-shouldered, black-beaded Victoria Beckham gown with her grandmother, Edwina Mountbatten's (Countess Mountbatten of Burma) white fox stole tossed over one arm
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Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
It operates principally from the Southampton General Hospital, but is also responsible for the Princess Anne Hospital, the Royal South Hants Hospital and the Countess Mountbatten House. The trust is a teaching and research centre, and operates a
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William McIlroy forced to repay £1200 to Countess Mountbatten Hospice - Daily Echo
Google News - over 5 years
But William McIlroy decided to keep £1200 he collected in lottery sales for the Countess Mountbatten Hospice in West End. The 58-year-old had worked for the charity for nearly ten years as a canvasser, but by July last year had received a verbal and
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Bluntly speaking - BBC News
Google News - over 5 years
"He always speaks his mind, sometimes not necessarily with a high degree of tact," says his cousin Countess Mountbatten. "But on the other hand, I think that people have come to expect that of him, and they really rather enjoy it and they think,
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India Hicks launches fine jewelry inspired by famous father David Hicks - Los Angeles Times (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Her mother, Pamela Hicks, a daughter of Countess Mountbatten of Burma and the last Viceroy of India, was a bridesmaid to Queen Elizabeth. And India's father, David Hicks, is the iconic 1960s and '70s interior designer known for his geometric patterns
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Lottery and Activities Coordinator - Third Sector
Google News - over 5 years
We are working in partnership with the Countess Mountbatten Hospice Charity to find a passionate and professional individual who can take responsibility for maximising the income generated through the Hospice Lottery and provide support for the people
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Prince Philip at 90, ITV1, review - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
The best of the other sources of anecdotes was Countess Mountbatten of Burma, the Duke's cousin. At the Coronation, she said, some peers kept sandwiches under their coronets, “and when there was an interval, the coronets would be taken off and the
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Legacy Botleigh Grange Hotel tickled pink to be hosting charity ball - PRLog.Org (press release)
Google News - almost 6 years
PRLog (Press Release) – May 06, 2011 – The Pretty in Pink ball is being held at The Legacy Botleigh Grange Hotel & Spa on Saturday, May 28 to raise funds for Breakthrough Breast Cancer Care and the Countess Mountbatten Hospice Charity
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A Royal Wedding? She's Been There
NYTimes - almost 6 years
''IT is dreadful,'' declared India Hicks, the model and former ''Top Design'' host, in a supremely proper English accent that made the phrase a symphony of syllables. She was sitting in a room at the Mark hotel on the Upper East Side, gazing out her window at rain squalls so thick they disguised the adjacent maze of apartment buildings. True to her
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Exit Strategy
NYTimes - over 9 years
INDIAN SUMMER The Secret History of the End of an Empire. By Alex von Tunzelmann. Illustrated. 401 pp. Henry Holt & Company. $30. On the balmy evening of Aug. 15, 1947, Earl Mountbatten of Burma, the great- grandson of Queen Victoria and the last viceroy of India, gave a sumptuous party in the Mughal Gardens of Delhi to mark the end of empire.
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Queen Elizabeth Turns 80, While Charles Waits
NYTimes - almost 11 years
Queen Elizabeth II, Britain's monarch for 54 years, celebrated her 80th birthday on Friday, an occasion that drew headlines like ''Elizabeth the Great'' and ''Our Great Mum'' and also raised questions about her succession. As a royal standard measuring 19 by 38 feet flew over the Round Tower at Windsor Castle, her residence west of London, the
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Social Events
NYTimes - almost 26 years
For Young Musicians April 9 -- A concert at 8 P.M. in memory of the late soprano Eleanor Steber at the Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall will benefit New Music for Young Ensembles, which sponsors an annual competition for American composers. The group will present the world premieres of "Woodwind Quintet" by Joelle Wallach for flute, clarinet and
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ARCHITECTURE VIEW; A Cabinet of Curiosities Becomes a Museum
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: IN THIS ERA OF OVEREXPANDING museums, not only are the buildings themselves often losing their recognizable profiles, but the private collections that formed the institutions have long since merged their individual identities. Time was in earlier centuries when anyone of means who traveled to distant lands reurned with a few artifacts that
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THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - about 30 years
''WE wish you a merry Christmas.'' ''Bah, humbug!'' Those sentiments were heard in this week's round of preholiday festivities, which ranged from a staged reading of ''A Christmas Carol'' starring F. Murray Abraham to the singing of Christmas carols by the Boys Choir of Harlem at the Metropolitan Club. Monday's reading of the Dickens classic at the
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F. Murray Abraham To Say, 'Bah, Humbug'
NYTimes - about 30 years
Ebenezer Scrooge, in the person of F. Murray Abraham, will appear next Monday at 7:30 P.M. at a staged reading of Charles Dickens's ''Christmas Carol'' at the Marriott Marquis Theater, Broadway and 45th Street. The reading is part of a benefit for the Riverside Shakespeare Company and the Anglo-American School. A reception and dinner will follow
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RING LARDNER BY ANY OTHER NAME: REAL-LIFE CHARACTERS IN FICTION
NYTimes - almost 31 years
AHEARN, in ''The Young Lions'' (1948) by Irwin Shaw. Critics welcomed this as an outstanding novel of the Second World War. But Ernest Hemingway -according to his biographer, Carlos Baker - thought it a disgraceful, ignoble book, written by a coward who had never fired a shot in anger. He took the American war correspondent, Ahearn, to be a
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THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - about 33 years
THIS week's theme song could well have been ''What Are the Simple Folk Doing Tonight?'' There was no question about what the fancy folk were doing. They were out partying. As one woman-about-town lamented, ''I'm having my hair done so many times, by Christmas I won't have a hair left on my head.'' On Tuesday, there was a black-tie dinner at the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Edwina Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma
    FIFTIES
  • 1960
    Age 58
    In accordance with her wishes, Lord Mountbatten buried her at sea off the coast of Portsmouth from HMS Wakeful on 25 February 1960; Nehru sent two Indian destroyers to accompany her body; Geoffrey Fisher, the Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated.
    More Details Hide Details Lady Mountbatten will be portrayed by Gillian Anderson in Gurinder Chadha's upcoming historical drama film Viceroy's House.
  • FORTIES
  • 1950
    Age 48
    In 1950 the link with the monarchy was severed and India's governor general was replaced with a non-executive president.
    More Details Hide Details Lady Mountbatten, in all accounts of the violent disruption that followed the Partition of India, is universally praised for her heroic efforts in relieving the misery. She continued to lead a life of service after her viceroyalty in India, including service for the St John Ambulance Brigade.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1922
    Age 20
    She and Mountbatten married on 18 July 1922 at St. Margaret's Church.
    More Details Hide Details The wedding attracted crowds of more than 8,000 people, and was attended by many members of the royal family, including Queen Mary, Queen Alexandra, David the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) and Prince Philip, and dubbed "wedding of the year". The reception was held in Brook House after which the couple rode a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost to the bride's family's country house. Edwina was known to be wildly promiscuous throughout the marriage, doing little to hide such indiscretions from her husband. He became aware of her numerous lovers, accepted them and even developed friendships with some of them - making them "part of the family". Towards the end of Edwina's life, her daughter Pamela Mountbatten wrote a memoir of her mother in which she describes her mother as "a man eater" and her mother's many lovers as a succession of "uncles" throughout her childhood.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1920
    Age 18
    By the time Lord Louis Mountbatten first met Edwina in 1920, she was a leading member of London society.
    More Details Hide Details Her maternal grandfather died in 1921, leaving her £2 million (£ in today's pounds), and his palatial London townhouse, Brook House, at a time when her future husband's naval salary was £610 per annum (£ in today's pounds). Later, she would inherit the country seat of Broadlands, Hampshire, from her father, Wilfred William Ashley, 1st Baron Mount Temple.
  • 1914
    Age 12
    After Ashley's father's remarriage in 1914 to Molly Forbes-Sempill, she was sent away to boarding schools, first to the Links in Eastbourne, then to Alde House in Suffolk, at neither of which was she a willing pupil.
    More Details Hide Details Her grandfather, Sir Ernest, solved the domestic dilemma by inviting her to live with him and, eventually, to act as hostess at his London residence, Brook House. Later, his other mansions, Moulton Paddocks and Branksome Dene, would become part of her Cassel inheritance.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1901
    Born
    She was born in 1901, the elder daughter of Wilfred William Ashley, later 1st Baron Mount Temple (of the 1932 creation), who was a Conservative Member of Parliament.
    More Details Hide Details Edwina Ashley was patrilineally descended from the Earls of Shaftesbury who had been ranked as baronets since 1622 and ennobled as barons in 1661. She was a great-granddaughter of the reformist 7th Earl of Shaftesbury through his younger son, The Hon. Evelyn Melbourne Ashley (1836–1907) and his wife, Sybella Farquhar (d. 1886), a granddaughter of the 6th Duke of Beaufort. From this cadet branch, the Ashley-Cooper peers would inherit the estates of Broadlands and Classiebawn Castle in Sligo, Ireland. Ashley's mother was Amalia Mary Maud Cassel (1879–1911), daughter of the international magnate Sir Ernest Joseph Cassel, friend and private financier to the future King Edward VII. Cassel was one of the richest and most powerful men in Europe. He lost his beloved wife (Annette Mary Maud Maxwell), for whom he had converted from Judaism to Roman Catholicism. He also lost his only child, Amalia. He was then to leave the bulk of his vast fortune to Edwina, his elder granddaughter.
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