Daniel J. Sullivan
American director
Daniel J. Sullivan
Daniel J. Sullivan is an American theatre and film director and playwright.
Biography
Daniel J. Sullivan's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Daniel J. Sullivan from around the web
Review: ‘Troilus and Cressida,’ a Trojan War Love Story
NYTimes - 7 months
Daniel Sullivan’s staging of this relatively obscure Shakespeare play at the Delacorte Theater gets many things right.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
The Week Ahead: ‘Troilus and Cressida’ Brings Love and War to Central Park
NYTimes - 7 months
Daniel Sullivan directs a version of one of Shakespeare’s problem plays at the Delacorte Theater for the free Shakespeare in the Park series.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Macbeth </em> at Berkeley Rep: Visually Stunning but Short on Dramatic Interplay and Impact
Huffington Post - 12 months
Conleth Hill as Macbeth, Frances McDormand as Lady Macbeth in Shakespeare's classic tale Photos by Kevin Berne Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow may give director Daniel Sullivan and his colleagues the time they need to reinforce the strengths and repair the weaknesses of their Macbeth at Berkeley Rep. At the moment, though, their efforts have shaped only a technical triumph that sorely lacks performances worthy of their backdrop. Highly anticipated because of the involvement of Sullivan, perhaps the country's most respected interpreter of Shakespeare, along with stars Conleth Hill in the title role and Frances McDormand as Lady Macbeth, the production offers an abundance of sound and fury but too little interpersonal passion. In case you're unfamiliar with the stars, McDormand's many accolades include a Tony, an Oscar and an Emmy; Hill holds an Olivier award for work in London, several Tony nominations on Broadway and current attention on HBO's Game of Thrones. The ...
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Huffington Post article
On the Culture Front: Henry IV, El Vy, The Civilians' War on Christmas, and more
Huffington Post - about 1 year
The immersion into Phyllida Lloyd's meticulously crafted reimagination of "Henry IV" begins before the audience steps foot into the new home of St. Ann's Warehouse. I was cutting it close on a recent evening and walking briskly to the theater as I noticed a chain gang of prisoners being led down the street by stern-faced guards. I slipped in the main entrance a few minutes before their arrival and subsequent parade through the lobby, which was prefaced by a thundering announcement of their arrival. Seating is organized in "blocks" to heighten the mood and guards are positioned through the theater as a reminder that the kingdom being fought over exists within the fragile boundaries of the inmates' imagination. This eerie feeling pulsates throughout the play though there are only a handful of moments that exist outside of Shakespeare's text. Clare Dunne is a particular standout in the all-female cast as next-in-line-for-the-throne Hal. When she stands on a makeshift podium, the drivin ...
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Huffington Post article
History and Honor at Brent Family Cemetery in Aquia, Virginia
Huffington Post - over 1 year
This story first appeared in the Arlington Catholic Herald, the award-winning newspaper for the Catholic Diocese of Arlington, Virginia. A little-known knob in the tree of Virginia history lies at the end of a dirt road in Aquia. Neighboring St. William of York Church in Stafford and flanked by wooded swampland, the Brent Family Cemetery dates back to 1686, when King James II of England granted George Brent a swath of 30,000 acres nestled between the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers. With that grant, the king also issued a royal mandate for the Brents to freely practice their Catholic faith. Brent was the nephew of Maryland Governor Giles Brent who, with his better-known sister, Margaret -- a businesswoman and the first American woman to demand the right to vote -- fled to Virginia in 1649 following attacks led by Protestant ship captain Richard Ingle. Like many Catholic families after the outbreak of the English Civil War, they no longer felt safe in Maryland. Thus, the Brents ...
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Huffington Post article
First Nighter: Annaleigh Ashford as A. R. Gurney's Talking Dog Runs Away With 'Sylvia'
Huffington Post - over 1 year
When it gets to coming on strong these days, few are coming on stronger than Annaleigh Ashford. She was a Tony, Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle awards nominee two years ago for Kinky Boots (after appearances in Legally Blonde, Wicked and Hair) and then won the Tony, Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circles awards last year for the You Can't Take It With You revival. Then, she played committed-to-ballet Essie Sycamore. Now she's putting her hilarious physical and verbal skills to good use as the title character in A. R. Gurney's Sylvia, at the Cort Theatre. The comedy winks at a particular instance of a dog being man's best friend -- but not, as Gurney writes it, a woman's best friend. What the prolific playwright has here is the study of one guy's middle-age crisis, kinda sorta mixed with one guy's offbeat seven-year itch. The poor fellow is Greg (Matthew Broderick), who's bored with his job but wrested from his malaise when he finds an abandoned dog in Central Park, whose tag ...
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Huffington Post article
Theater: A Fighting Cock; A Not-So-Wild "Geese" On Broadway
Huffington Post - over 3 years
YEAR OF THE ROOSTER *** out of **** THE SNOW GEESE ** 1/2 out of **** YEAR OF THE ROOSTER *** out of **** ENSEMBLE STUDIO THEATRE For 45 years, the Ensemble Studio Theatre has been nurturing new voices. Clearly it's been hitting a new peak under the artistic direction of William Carden. They've received Obie awards and serious success with shows like Hand To God and Finks. An EST show is sure to have a distinctive voice, very talented actors and a spirit of passionate support. That's all on display with Year Of The Rooster by Eric Dufault. EST has been with this writer from the start of the project, taking it from a rough idea on paper to sharing a few pages to a workshop staging and now this full production on their mainstage to launch a new season. It's peopled with excellent performances (kudos to casting director Tom Rowan) and makes the most of modest resources to get across the idea of a young talent. Room for growth can be seen in a second act that loses its way a bit. But ...
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Huffington Post article
Dressed to Die For: Mary-Louise Parker in The Snow Geese, Trudie Styler in an Anglo-Irish The Seagull, Marin Ireland in Marie Antoinette
Huffington Post - over 3 years
In Sharr White's new play The Snow Geese at the Samuel J. Friedman Theater, Mary-Louise Parker as Elizabeth wears black, in mourning for her dead husband, but really she is attired in Jane Greenwood's circa 1917 period detail, eh weeds, for a lost way of life. Under Daniel Sullivan's direction, a family who thinks it has money, now doesn't. Two brothers (Evan Jongkeit and Brian Cross, both very fine) vie in Oedipal conflict. Max Hohmann (Danny Burstein), a doctor put out of business because he is German, administers laudanum while his wife and Elizabeth's sister Clarissa (Victoria Clark) keeps everyone in line. The pretty Ukrainian maid Victoria (Jessica Love) learns to make coffee, now that she's a refugee from former upper class wealth. A gun brandished, fires off. Wild geese fly afrenzy as if in Hitchcock's The Birds. As soon as you know the house will go, you are in Chekhov country, even though the setting is rural New York. But geographic and psychic dislocation also mark Thomas ...
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Huffington Post article
<i>Snow Geese</i>: A Chekhov Wannabe With Mary-Louise Parker
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Everybody can't be Chekhov, but that has never stopped other playwrights from trying. Sharr White, who had a solid success with The Other Place on Broadway earlier this year, makes his own lackluster stab with The Snow Geese, a rather dreary mess of a play that opened last night in a Manhattan Theatre Club production with Mary-Louise Parker at center stage. In Snow Geese, White appears to be aiming at a sort of Cherry Orchard meets Seagull with the Gaesling family's hunting lodge outside Syracuse, N.Y., substituting for the Gayev family's fated cherry trees and the flock of geese of White's title standing in for the dead bird of Chekhov's. The Gaeslings, however, drink coffee instead of samovars of tea. The action takes place at the aforementioned country house over a 24-hour period beginning on the morning of Nov. 1, 1917. It has been eight weeks since Ted Gaesling died and his widow, Elizabeth, and two sons, Duncan and Arnold, are attempting to carry on dad's tradition of holdin ...
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Huffington Post article
City Room: Dying in the Line of Duty on a Sept. 11 Decades Ago
NYTimes - over 3 years
On Sept. 11, 1954, Daniel Sullivan died after flying off the back of a fire truck in Queens, so 9/11 has ever since had special meaning to his family.     
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NYTimes article
City Room: For One Firefighter’s Family, Sept. 11 Was Already a Day to Mourn
NYTimes - over 3 years
On Sept. 11, 1954, Daniel Sullivan died after flying off the back of a fire truck in Queens, so 9/11 has ever since had special meaning to his family.     
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Regina Weinreich: James Gandolfini Evoked in Comedy of Errors at the Delacorte
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Central Park offers a natural bucolic setting for Shakespeare's lighter fare, but with this year's Comedy of Errors, its lush greens frame an urban stage for Ephesus, a fictive town in upstate New York that harbors mob types among its citizenry. At center, three buildings rotate in the foreground representing by turns a train station (Adirondack Transit Lines), brothel, hotel, jewelry shop, a private home, Saint Bridget's abbey with an homage to Edward Hopper's as the back street. This smalltown, USA designed by John Lee Beatty ideally serves the shenanigans involving a set of twins, attended by another set of twins, just the fodder for Shakespearean mistaken identities. Three couples jitterbug as a preamble, signaling a jazz age time shift for the Chaplin meets Gumby of Dromio (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) and the dapper man he serves Antipholus (Hamish Linklater). A Duke (Skipp Sudduth) whose voice is more Guys &amp; Dolls--or a nod to James Gandolfini as Tony Soprano--metes justic ...
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Huffington Post article
The Comedy of Errors: Theater Review - Hollywood Reporter
Google News - over 3 years
Hollywood Reporter The Comedy of Errors: Theater Review Hollywood Reporter An often tiresome play gets an engaging jumpstart from master Shakespeare director Daniel Sullivan and a first-rate cast. Venue. Delacorte Theater, New York (runs through June 30). Cast. Hamish Linklater, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Emily Bergl. Heidi Schreck ... The Comedy of ErrorsEntertainment Weekly A 'Comedy of Errors' Unfolds in the '40s, With FedorasNew York Times (blog) Theater Review: An Economically Robust Comedy of ErrorsVulture NBC New York -Huffington Post -Financial Times all 11 news articles »
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Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Daniel J. Sullivan
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2010
    Age 69
    His collaborations with Donald Margulies include the Pulitzer-Prize-winning Dinner With Friends in New York and Los Angeles, the Broadway revival of Sight Unseen, and the Broadway productions of Brooklyn Boy and the 2010 Broadway production of Time Stands Still.
    More Details Hide Details Sullivan has directed most of Charlayne Woodard's plays: Pretty Fire (Seattle Rep, 1994-95), Neat (Seattle Rep, 1996–97), Stories (Seattle Rep, May 1999), In Real Life (Mark Taper Forum, July 2001 and Manhattan Theatre Club, October 2002) and The Nightwatcher. Other Broadway credits include Retreat From Moscow, Morning's at Seven, Proof, Major Barbara, A Moon for the Misbegotten, Accent on Youth, The Homecoming, Rabbit Hole, Prelude to a Kiss, After The Night And The Music, Julius Caesar, and Ah, Wilderness. For Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte, Sullivan directed The Merry Wives of Windsor, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2007) and Twelfth Night (2009). Other Off-Broadway credits include Stuff Happens, Intimate Apparel, Ancestral Voices, Spinning Into Butter, Far East, London Suite, Psychopathia Sexualis The American Clock, and Good People.
  • FORTIES
  • 1981
    Age 40
    After two years as Resident Director of the Seattle Repertory Theatre, he assumed the position of Artistic Director in 1981, serving until 1997.
    More Details Hide Details It was there that he directed the first production of his own play, Inspecting Carol. Sullivan has forged successful working relationships with many prominent American playwrights. He directed Herb Gardner's Tony winning I'm Not Rappaport at Seattle Rep before staging it off-Broadway, on Broadway, in London's West End, and the United States national tour. He reteamed with Gardner to stage Conversations with My Father in Seattle, New York City, and Los Angeles. His first association with Wendy Wasserstein was the Pulitzer Prize and Tony-winning The Heidi Chronicles, which he directed off Broadway, on Broadway and its National Tour. The duo later collaborated on The Sisters Rosensweig on Broadway and the National Tour, An American Daughter, and Ms. Wasserstein's final play, Third. He directed both the off-Broadway and screen version of Jon Robin Baitz's The Substance of Fire, as well as the original productions of A Fair Country and Ten Unknowns in New York, and Baitz's translation of Hedda Gabler in Los Angeles.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1971
    Age 30
    His directorial debut there was A.R. Gurney's Scenes from American Life in 1971. for which he won a Drama Desk Award.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1963
    Age 22
    In 1963, he began his professional career as an actor at the city's Actor's Workshop, where he remained for two years.
    More Details Hide Details Sullivan worked as both an actor and director with the Lincoln Center Repertory Company in the late 1960s and 1970s.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1940
    Born
    Born on June 10, 1940.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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