Dashiell Hammett
American Novelist
Dashiell Hammett
Samuel Dashiell Hammett was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories, screenplay writer, and political activist. Among the enduring characters he created are Sam Spade, Nick and Nora Charles, and the Continental Op. In addition to the significant influence his novels and stories had on film, Hammett "is now widely regarded as one of the finest mystery writers of all time" and was called, in his obituary in The New York Times, "the dean of the...
Biography
Dashiell Hammett's personal information overview.
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When We Need Our Barbarians - Grantland
Google News - over 5 years
It's a face that belongs on the cover of a crime pulp — maybe Black Mask, in which Dashiell Hammett serialized The Maltese Falcon in 1929, or Spicy Detective, which launched in the year the photo was taken, 1934. 1 You look at the picture and think of
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Firm scores Kurosawa remake rights - CBC.ca
Google News - over 5 years
He noted his Yojimbo (which eventually spawned Sergio Leone's A Fistful of Dollars) took direction from The Glass Key, the film noir adaptation of the Dashiell Hammett novel, while his films Throne of Blood and Ran were retellings of Shakespeare's
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USPS celebrates John Huston -- and Baltimore's Dashiell Hammett - Baltimore Sun (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Huston follows Dashiell Hammett's novel almost to the letter, but he heightens the greed of the characters until they become satiric, and he adds a magical curtain line - Bogey looking at the worthless title bird and calling it "The stuff that dreams
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HBO Releases BORED TO DEATH "Invitation to the Set" Video - The Daily BLAM
Google News - over 5 years
On a whim, Ames decides to emulate his idol novelists Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler by posing as a private detective and offering his services through an online ad. Soon enough, he takes on various cases of unwitting clients, satisfying some
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The fires that burn in the loneliest guys on the pitch - The National
Google News - over 5 years
... players and therefore are reluctantly thrown in net, the truth is that a goalkeeper - regardless of the sport - is the sporting world's equivalent of the hardboiled detective created by Dashiell Hammett and made more popular by Raymond Chandler
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The webcomic Hard Boiled Shaman is a supernatural detective noir of the North - io9
Google News - over 5 years
Muktuk Wolfsbreath may have the internal monologue of Dashiell Hammett protagonist, but he carries bone darts instead of a gat, solves crimes in the literal underworld, and beds a femme fatale who rides a reindeer. Many years ago, Terry LaBan created
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Mexican author Paco Ignacio Taibo II honored for 30 years of work - Fox News
Google News - over 5 years
Poniatowska, for her part, praised the crime novelist, winner of the Planeta novel award in 1992 and three-time winner of the International Dashiell Hammett Prize, as a "key figure in Mexican literature." During the ceremony, she teased Taibo by
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Nick and Nora - ABC Online
Google News - over 5 years
Nick and Nora Charles, characters created by Dashiell Hammett in his novel The Thin Man, went on to inspire six films, a radio show, and a television series. The original Broadway production, directed by Arthur Laurents opened on December 8,
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Golden Gazette Newspaper Hearkens Back to Early 20th Century Americana - San Francisco Chronicle (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Famed mystery/thriller/adventure writers as Edgar Rice Burroughs, Raymond Chandler, Carroll John Daly, Lester Dent, Walter B. Gibson, Dashiell Hammett, L. Ron Hubbard, H. Bedford Jones and Norvell Page publishing their tales in such notable magazines
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LOCAL INTELLIGENCE; Hollywood Film Exchanges: Tenderloin, San Francisco
NYTimes - over 5 years
Three MGM lions on a building on Hyde Street in today's seamy Tenderloin district are a reminder of a bit of Hollywood history. From the 1930s to the 1960s, the area was home to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 20th Century-Fox, Paramount, Columbia and other Hollywood studios, which set up film distribution centers along Hyde Street between Golden Gate and
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'Very Bad Men' Author Harry Dolan Knows His Pulp - Wall Street Journal (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
His book, a tensely-paced piece of crime fiction, reads an awful lot like the pulp crime novels of Chandler and contemporaries like Dashiell Hammett. “Chandler said that scene is more important than plot,” Dolan said. “A good scene, one that requires a
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The New Master of Noir - Daily Beast
Google News - over 5 years
... is the pseudonym under which Banville has written five crime novels, good books but so unlike the dense, witty books Banville writes under his own name that it's rather as if Nabokov had been unmasked as the author of Dashiell Hammett's mysteries
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DeKalb library to participate in 'Big Read' again - Dekalb Daily Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
This year, the DeKalb Public Library's program will focus on “The Maltese Falcon,” by Dashiell Hammett, a choice library director Dee Coover said she was excited about since more people know the 1941 John Huston film starring Humphrey Bogart than they
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ANN ARBOR: Local author pens second mystery novel - Heritage Newspapers
Google News - over 5 years
In college, he discovered Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett, and read "The Big Sleep," "The Long Goodbye" and "The Maltese Falcon" when he should have been reading philosophy. At Colgate University, Dolan was an editor of The Mage,
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411mania Interviews: Joe Maddalena (Hollywood Treasure) - 411mania.com
Google News - over 5 years
One of my personal favorite things was literature – I loved Dashiell Hammett, F Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, James Joyce – and we'd venture out in Hollywood and I started buying scripts and movie cards and poster of the movie adaptations of the
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Call Board – July 3 - Allentown Morning Call
Google News - over 5 years
Crowded Kitchen Players will hold auditions for Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon" 7-8:30 pm Wednesday and Friday at McCoole's Arts and Events Place, 10 S. Main St. Quakertown. . Seeking 12 actors: Sam Spade, age 30-55; Brigid, 25-40; Captain,
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What should you take to the lake? Something old, something new - City Pulse
Google News - over 5 years
"The Maltese Falcon," by Dashiell Hammett: The classic tough-guy/noir-detective novel that never loses its appeal. Since it was first published in 1930, it's the book mystery and thriller writers dream of writing. "Once Upon A River," by Bonnie Jo
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Rereading: Mildred Pierce by James M Cain - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
After Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler Cain is the writer most often credited with defining the "hard-boiled", the tough-talking, fast-moving urban stories of violence, sex and money that characterised so much popular film and fiction in America
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dashiell Hammett
    OTHER
  • 1961
    Hammett died in Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, on January 10, 1961, of lung cancer, diagnosed just two months before.
    More Details Hide Details As a veteran of two world wars, he was buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Hammett's relationship with Lillian Hellman was portrayed in the film Julia. Jason Robards won an Oscar for his depiction of Hammett, and Jane Fonda was nominated for her portrayal of Lillian Hellman. Hammett was portrayed semi-fictionally as the protagonist in the film Hammett. Novels All the novels except The Thin Man were originally serialized in three, four, or five parts in various magazines. Short fiction Collected short fiction Screenplays Other publications In 2011, magazine editor Andrew Gulli found fifteen previously unknown short stories by Dashiell Hammett in the archives of the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas in Austin.
  • 1953
    He testified on March 26, 1953, before the House Un-American Activities Committee about his own activities but refused to cooperate with the committee.
    More Details Hide Details No official action was taken, but his stand led to his being blacklisted, along with others who were blacklisted as a result of McCarthyism. Hammett became an alcoholic before working in advertising and alcoholism continued to trouble him until 1948, when he quit after his doctor's orders. However, years of heavy drinking and smoking worsened the tuberculosis he contracted in World War I, and then according to Hellman "jail had made a thin man thinner, a sick man sicker... I knew he would now always be sick." Hellman wrote that during the 1950s Hammett became "a hermit", his decline evident in the clutter of his rented "ugly little country cottage", where "signs of sickness were all around: now the phonograph was unplayed, the typewriter untouched, the beloved foolish gadgets unopened in their packages." He may have meant to start a new literary life with the novel Tulip but left it unfinished, perhaps because he was "just too ill to care, too worn out to listen to plans or read contracts. The fact of breathing, just breathing, took up all the days and nights." Hammett could no longer live alone, and they both knew it, so he spent the last four years of his life with Hellman. "Not all of that time was easy, and some of it very bad", she wrote, but, "guessing death was not too far away, I would try for something to have afterwards."
  • 1951
    Hammett testified on July 9, 1951, in front of United States District Court Judge Sylvester Ryan, facing questioning by Irving Saypol, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, described by Time as "the nation's number one legal hunter of top Communists".
    More Details Hide Details During the hearing, Hammett refused to provide the information the government wanted, specifically the list of contributors to the bail fund, "people who might be sympathetic enough to harbor the fugitives." Instead, on every question regarding the CRC or the bail fund, Hammett declined to answer, citing the Fifth Amendment, refusing to even identify his signature or initials on CRC documents the government had subpoenaed. As soon as his testimony concluded, Hammett was found guilty of contempt of court. Hammett served time in a West Virginia federal penitentiary where, according to Lillian Hellman, he was assigned to clean toilets. Hellman noted in her eulogy of Hammett that he submitted to prison rather than reveal the names of the contributors to the fund because "he had come to the conclusion that a man should keep his word." During the 1950s, Hammett was investigated by Congress.
  • 1947
    On April 3, 1947, the CRC was identified as a Communist front group on the Attorney General's List of Subversive Organizations, as directed by U.S. President Harry S. Truman's Executive Order 9835.
    More Details Hide Details The CRC's bail fund gained national attention on November 4, 1949, when bail in the amount of "$260,000 in negotiable government bonds" was posted "to free eleven men appealing their convictions under the Smith Act for criminal conspiracy to teach and advocate the overthrow of the United States government by force and violence." On July 2, 1951, their appeals exhausted, four of the convicted men fled rather than surrender themselves to Federal agents and begin serving their sentences. The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York issued subpoenas to the trustees of the CRC bail fund in an attempt to learn the whereabouts of the fugitives.
  • 1946
    After the war, Hammett returned to political activism, "but he played that role with less fervor than before." He was elected President of the Civil Rights Congress (CRC) on June 5, 1946, at a meeting held at the Hotel Diplomat in New York City, and "devoted the largest portion of his working time to CRC activities".
    More Details Hide Details In 1946, a bail fund was created by the CRC "to be used at the discretion of three trustees to gain the release of defendants arrested for political reasons." Those three trustees were Hammett, who was chairman, Robert W. Dunn, and Frederick Vanderbilt Field, "millionaire Communist supporter."
  • 1943
    In 1943, still a member of the military, he co-authored The Battle of the Aleutians with Cpl.
    More Details Hide Details Robert Colodny, under the direction of an infantry intelligence officer, Major Henry W. Hall. While in the Aleutians he developed emphysema.
  • 1942
    In early 1942, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hammett again enlisted in the United States Army.
    More Details Hide Details He was a disabled veteran of World War I, a victim of tuberculosis, and a Communist, but he pulled strings in order to be admitted. He served as a sergeant in the Aleutian Islands, where he edited an Army newspaper.
  • 1940
    He suspended his anti-fascist activities when, as a member (and in 1941 president) of the League of American Writers, he served on its Keep America Out of War Committee in January 1940 during the period of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1937
    Hammett devoted much of his life to left-wing activism. He was a strong anti-fascist throughout the 1930s and in 1937 joined the Communist Party.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1934
    Though he sporadically continued to work on material, he wrote his final novel in 1934, more than twenty-five years before his death.
    More Details Hide Details It is not certain why he moved away from fiction; Hellman speculated in a posthumous collection of Hammett's novels that "I think, but I only think, I know a few of the reasons: he wanted to do new kind of work, he was sick for many of those years and getting sicker."
  • 1931
    In 1931, Hammett embarked on a 30-year affair with the playwright Lillian Hellman.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1929
    In 1929 and 1930, he was romantically involved with Nell Martin, a writer of short stories and several novels.
    More Details Hide Details He dedicated The Glass Key to her, and in turn, she dedicated her novel Lovers Should Marry to him.
  • 1922
    Hammett was first published in 1922 in the magazine The Smart Set.
    More Details Hide Details Known for the authenticity and realism of his writing, he drew on his experiences as a Pinkerton operative. Hammett wrote most of his detective fiction while he was living in San Francisco in the 1920s, and streets and other locations in San Francisco are frequently mentioned in his stories. He said that "All my characters were based on people I've known personally, or known about." Raymond Chandler, often considered Hammett's successor, summarized his accomplishments in The Simple Art of Murder: Hammett was the ace performer... He is said to have lacked heart; yet the story he himself thought the most of, The Glass Key, is the record of a man's devotion to a friend. He was spare, frugal, hard-boiled, but he did over and over again what only the best writers can ever do at all. He wrote scenes that seemed never to have been written before.
  • 1918
    Hammett enlisted in the Army in 1918 and served in the Motor Ambulance Corps.
    More Details Hide Details However, he became ill with the Spanish flu and later contracted tuberculosis. He spent most of his time in the Army as a patient at Cushman Hospital in Tacoma, Washington, where he met a nurse, Josephine Dolan, whom he later married. Hammett and Dolan had two daughters, Mary Jane (born 1921) and Josephine (born 1926). Shortly after the birth of their second child, Health Services nurses informed Dolan that due to Hammett's TB, she and the children should not live with him full-time. Dolan rented a home in San Francisco, California, where Hammett would visit on weekends. The marriage soon fell apart, but he continued to financially support his wife and daughters with the income he made from his writing.
  • 1915
    He served as an operative for Pinkerton from 1915 to February 1922, with time off to serve in World War I.
    More Details Hide Details However, the agency's role in union strike-breaking eventually disillusioned him.
  • 1894
    Born on May 27, 1894.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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