Dave Garroway
Television journalist
Dave Garroway
David Cunningham "Dave" Garroway was an American television personality. He was the founding host and anchor of NBC's Today from 1952 to 1961. His easygoing and relaxing style belied a battle with depression. Garroway has been honored for his contributions to radio and television with a star for each on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as well as the St. Louis Walk of Fame, the city where he spent part of his teenage years and early adulthood.
Biography
Dave Garroway's personal information overview.
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Bill Jacobson, Comedy Writer From TV's Golden Era, Dies at 91 - Hollywood Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Jacobson was a contemporary of and worked alongside Neil and Danny Simon, Larry Gelbart, Jerry Bach and Yip Harburg and was associated with a classic 1954 Max Liebman TV special, Babes in Toyland, starring Dave Garroway as Santa Claus
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Bill Kurtis, Tom Skilling Reflect as Chicago Newsers Gather at Broadcast Museum - mediabistro.com
Google News - over 5 years
“Phil Donahue, Oprah Winfrey, Kukla, Fran and Ollie, Dave Garroway, Paul Harvey - the broadcast history of this city is just amazing,” legendary WGN meteorologist Tom Skilling tells TVSpy. “We really have a story to tell here
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Producer from TV's early days dies at 89 - TheChronicleHerald.ca
Google News - over 5 years
Banner was producer or executive producer of shows starring Perry Como, Dave Garroway and Garry Moore, in addition to Burnett and Shore. He produced two specials to help save Carnegie Hall from demolition in the early 1960s, the second of which starred
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Bob Banner Dies at 89; Producer in TV's Infancy - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Mr. Banner was producer or executive producer of shows starring Perry Como, Dave Garroway and Garry Moore, in addition to Ms. Burnett and Ms. Shore. He produced two specials to help save Carnegie Hall from demolition in the early 1960s, the second of
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Gennaro Meoli, trumpeter with Bellboys, shirtmaker, dies at 76 | Philadelphia ... - Philadelphia Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
They also played the Riverside in Reno, and on various TV shows, including Dave Garroway's "Wide Wide World," and the "Colgate Comedy Hour" with Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. In the spring of 1957, Freddie Bell and the Bellboys had a successful tour of
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Paid Notice: Deaths FISHEL, JAMES W.
NYTimes - over 5 years
FISHEL--James W.,James W. Fishel, an advertising executive for more than 50 years and former president of Fairfax Advertising Agency, a division of Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide, died yesterday at his home in Manhattan. He was 93 years old. A native of New York City, Mr. Fishel attended the city's public schools. After graduating from Washington &
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Paid Notice: Deaths FISHEL, JAMES W.
NYTimes - over 5 years
FISHEL--James W.,James W. Fishel, an advertising executive for more than 50 years and former president of Fairfax Advertising Agency, a division of Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide, died yesterday at his home in Manhattan. He was 93 years old. A native of New York City, Mr. Fishel attended the city's public schools. After graduating from Washington &
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Today In History - Sports Radio ESPN 1420
Google News - over 5 years
In 1961, Dave Garroway made his last appearance as host of NBC's "Today" show. In 1969, Dick Cavett began a three night a week, prime time television series on ABC. In 1977, George Willig scaled the World Trade Center in New York City
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Confidence boost from an unlikely place - Schenectady Gazette (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
When I was 16, I appeared on "The Dave Garroway Show," the very first morning show on NBC, to discuss my literary aspirations, and I spent the summer at Columbia University on scholarship attending a special journalism program
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From the Vault of Art Shay: Studs - Chicagoist
Google News - almost 6 years
Early on, while running Stud's Place, a fictional TV joint with Beverly Younger as smarmy waitress, I remember one interview Studs did with Chicago TV's brilliant Dave Garroway. "You looked out your window and you saw these two kids making out in the
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Talk show icons got start here - Chicago Tribune
Google News - almost 6 years
... the first late-night talk show here, a year before Steve Allen and his "Tonight Show"; Dave Garroway, Lee Phillip and her "Mornin' Miss Lee" show on WBBM-Ch. 2 in 1953; Studs Terkel; Irv Kupcinet; Bob Lewandowski; Sig Sakowicz … it's a long list
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Designing for Destruction: The Rise of the Bomb Shelter - The Atlantic
Google News - almost 6 years
It may have been a bad dream, but I vividly recall, as a kid in the late '50s, that I heard the newscaster Jack Lescoulie on The Today Show with Dave Garroway predict on air that by 1960 the United States and Russia would be fighting
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Conrad John Band featuring Brian Erickson - WEAU-TV 13
Google News - almost 6 years
... enthusiastic praise from Myron Floren, accordionist on the Lawrence Welk Show from 1950 to 1982, and from Art Van Damme, known as “the father of the jazz accordion”, who performed on The Dinah Shore Show, Tonight, and The Dave Garroway Show
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People of Monroe: Charles Biebel - VillageSoup Belfast
Google News - almost 6 years
... Missouri where Charlie attended the Hanley Junior High School where his father taught and later the well respected "U City" Senior High School which lists Dave Garroway, the NBC Today Show host from 1952-61, as one of its graduates
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TV pioneer Ernie Kovacs a barrel of laughs - Philadelphia Inquirer
Google News - almost 6 years
Affiliate WPTZ stuck with Kovacs' show for a few months, but then went with the network offering, starring Dave Garroway. Kovacs left Philadelphia for New York. No copies exist of Three to Get Ready, but the boxed set includes three installments of a
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BOOKS; Trucks, Muscle Cars and a Racing Potato
NYTimes - over 7 years
FOR the first time, the wide-ranging book reviews published periodically in the Automobiles section include a book for the youngest readers (and their parents). Other books reviewed here range from a 60th anniversary history of Ford's F-Series trucks to an account of the making of the supercars of the muscle era and an ode to unrestored collector
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Irving R. Levine, 86; Made Economy Simple
NYTimes - almost 8 years
Irving R. Levine, the longtime NBC News correspondent whose easily accessible explanations of monetary policy, fluctuations in the Dow Jones industrial average and the intricacies of the global market helped make the economy a staple of television news, died in Washington on Friday. He was 86 and lived in Washington and Boca Raton, Fla. The cause
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dave Garroway
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1982
    Age 68
    His final such appearance was on the 30th anniversary show, on January 14, 1982.
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  • 1981
    Age 67
    In 1981, Garroway underwent open-heart surgery, a result of which he contracted a staph infection.
    More Details Hide Details On January 14, 1982, Today broadcast its 30th anniversary special, which featured all of the important living former and current staff members. Garroway, who had recently undergone rehab for an amphetamine addiction, appeared to be cheerful and in good spirits during the show. He also gave every indication that he would be present for the show's 35th anniversary in 1987. A few months later however, Garroway began suffering complications from the infection he'd picked up during surgery. He spent some weeks in and out of hospitals and had an in-home nurse tending to him. On July 21, he was found dead of a self-inflicted shotgun wound at his Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, home. There was no suicide note and Garroway's nurse did not recall him being unusually depressed in the final day of his life. Garroway's son Michael said that his father had been experiencing complications from his heart operation and he had "unfortunately succumbed to the traumatic effects of his illness." In addition, he was extremely depressed at his inability to resurrect a TV career, saying to friends and family "I'm old hat, old news. Nobody wants old Dave anymore." His family held a private graveside service for him in Philadelphia on July 28. Garroway is buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania.
  • 1980
    Age 66
    Garroway married astronomer Sarah Lee Lippincott in February 1980.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1972
    Age 58
    While in Los Angeles, Garroway began to take acting workshops; he had a role in an episode of the western series Alias Smith and Jones as a judge in 1972.
    More Details Hide Details Garroway appeared sporadically on other television programs without achieving the success and recognition levels he enjoyed on Today. He largely remained out of the public eye for the rest of the 1960s-70s although he did reemerge for Today anniversaries.
  • 1971
    Age 57
    He planned to reenter the television world with a CBS summer replacement show, Newcomers, but the show never made it past the summer of 1971.
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  • 1969
    Age 55
    In April 1969, Garroway launched a daytime talk show on WNAC-TV, Tempo Boston, which he hoped would be picked up for national syndication.
    More Details Hide Details Stations in New York and Philadelphia agreed to pick up the show, but by early 1970, the small-scale syndication ended and Tempo was cancelled. The show had promise, but management instead decided to fill its time slot with old movies instead of more expensive local programming. After leaving the Boston airwaves, Garroway traveled to southern California, hosting a music-and-talk show on KFI radio in Los Angeles.
  • FORTIES
  • 1962
    Age 48
    After leaving Today, Garroway returned to television on National Educational Television (the forerunner of PBS) with a science series called Exploring the Universe in late 1962.
    More Details Hide Details Later he went back to working in radio, doing "split shift" shows called Garroway AM (mid mornings) and Garroway PM (mid afternoons) for WCBS (AM), New York. Garroway also started a magazine, National FM-Radio; the venture was a costly failure with Garroway realizing he was not cut out to be a businessman. While he was in the publishing business, Garroway began reading various law books in an effort to try to understand what his lawyer was saying. His attorney told him that he had done enough legal reading to pass the New York State bar exam. On a bet, Garroway sat for and passed the written exam.
  • 1961
    Age 47
    On June 16, 1961, television's "Communicator" said goodbye to the morning show he helped pioneer.
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    In late May 1961, Garroway resigned, announcing his intention to leave Today-either at the end of October when his contract was finished or sooner, if possible; he wanted to spend more time with his children.
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    When Garroway's second wife, Pamela, died of a prescription drug overdose on April 28, 1961, Garroway sank into a deeper emotional malaise.
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    In 1961, Garroway hosted a special filmed program for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association that traced Billy Graham's crusades from 1949 to 1960.
    More Details Hide Details Garroway's laid-back demeanor on TV hid his struggle with depression. Toward the end of his professional career, he began to have disagreements with staff members; some days Garroway would disappear in the middle of the Today broadcast, leaving colleagues to finish the live program.
  • 1960
    Age 46
    By 1960, there was also a board game called "Dave Garroway's Today Game".
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  • 1959
    Age 45
    Garroway took Today to various locations during his tenure: Paris in 1959 and Rome in 1960; car shows and technology expos; plays and movies; and aboard an Air Force B-52 for a practice bombing run.
    More Details Hide Details Through television, Garroway gave viewers access to a variety of people that included politicians, writers, artists, scientists, economists, and musicians. In his role as Today host, Garroway acted as pitchman for several of the show's sponsors. Among them were Admiral television sets, Alcoa and Sergeant's dog food. Most of the appearances were in the form of print ads in newspapers and magazines.
  • 1956
    Age 42
    He married former actress and ballerina Pamela Wilde in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details They had a son, David Cunningham Garroway, Jr., in 1958. Garroway later adopted Wilde's son Michael from her first marriage. Wilde died of a prescription drug overdose on April 28, 1961.
    Garroway narrated a compilation of romantic songs performed by the Boston Pops Orchestra, Getting Friendly with Music, in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details He also served as narrator for special albums, including 1964's The Great Campaigners, 1928–1960 and 1960's Names From the Wars. In 1960, Garroway penned Fun on Wheels, an activity book for children on road trips. The book was revised and reissued in 1962 and 1964. Toward the end of his life, Garroway planned to write an autobiography. The book never made it past the research stage; the surviving notes, manuscripts, audio tapes, and news clippings were sent to former Today researcher Lee Lawrence. Upon Lawrence's death in 2003, the boxes were turned over to the Library of American Broadcasting, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries, where they resided as of 2009.
  • 1955
    Age 41
    On October 16, 1955, he began hosting NBC's live Sunday afternoon documentary Wide Wide World, continuing with that series until June 8, 1958.
    More Details Hide Details Another Friday evening variety show, Dave's Place, was on the air in 1960. He also hosted a radio show, Dial Dave Garroway, that went on the air as soon as Today wrapped up each morning. Dial Dave Garroway began in 1946 when Garroway was still working for WMAQ in Chicago.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1953
    Age 39
    At the same time he did Today, Garroway also hosted a Friday night variety series, The Dave Garroway Show, from October 2, 1953, to June 25, 1954.
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  • 1952
    Age 38
    He was joined by news editor Jim Fleming and announcer Jack Lescoulie when the show debuted on Monday, January 14, 1952.
    More Details Hide Details Though initially panned by critics, Garroway's style attracted a large audience that enjoyed his easygoing presence early in the morning. His familiar "cohost," a chimpanzee with the puckish name of J. Fred Muggs, didn't hurt his genial manner, but his concurrent seriousness in dealing with news stories and ability to clearly explain abstract concepts earned him the nickname "The Communicator" and eventually won praise from critics and viewers alike.
  • 1951
    Age 37
    Legendary pioneering NBC president Sylvester "Pat" Weaver chose Garroway as the host of his new morning news-and-entertainment experiment, the Today show, in 1951.
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    He won the award again in 1951.
    More Details Hide Details Garroway was the first "communicator" on NBC Radio's Monitor when the program first aired on June 12, 1955. He continued as the Sunday evening host of the news/music program from 1955 to 1961. Garroway worked on the air at WCBS radio in 1964 and briefly hosted the afternoon drive shift at KFI in Los Angeles in late 1970 and early 1971. Garroway was introduced to the national television audience when he hosted the experimental musical variety show Garroway at Large, telecast live from Chicago. It was carried by NBC from June 18, 1949, to June 24, 1951. Garroway's relaxed, informal style when on the air became part of his trademark. In 1960, New York Times reviewer Richard F. Shepard wrote, "He does not crash into the home with the false jollity and thunderous witticisms of a backslapper. He is pleasant, serious, scholarly looking and not obtrusively convivial." On television, Garroway was known for his signoff, saying "Peace" with an upraised palm.
  • 1948
    Age 34
    His fellow disc jockeys voted him the nation's best in the 1948 and 1949 Billboard polls.
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  • 1947
    Age 33
    Garroway also worked to organize jazz concerts, creating a "Jazz Circuit" of local clubs in 1947, bringing back interest in this music genre.
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  • 1945
    Age 31
    Garroway was married three times and had three children. His first marriage was to Adele Dwyer whom he married in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had a daughter, Paris, before divorcing the following year.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1941
    Age 27
    When the United States entered World War II in 1941, Garroway enlisted in the U.S. Navy.
    More Details Hide Details While stationed in Honolulu, he hosted a radio show when he was off duty, playing jazz records and reminiscing about the old days back in Chicago. After the war, Garroway went to work as a disc jockey at WMAQ (AM) in Chicago. Over time, Garroway hosted a series of radio programs such as The 11:60 Club, The Dave Garroway Show, and Reserved for Garroway. One oddity Garroway introduced on his radio shows was having the studio audience respond to a song number not by applauding but by snapping their fingers.
  • 1939
    Age 25
    Following graduation, he landed a job at Pittsburgh radio station KDKA in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details As a station reporter, he went about the region filing reports from a hot-air balloon, a U.S. Navy submarine in the Ohio River, and from deep inside a coal mine. His early reporting efforts earned Garroway a reputation for finding a good story, even if it took him to unusual places. The "Roving Announcer", as he was known, worked his way up to become the station's special events director, while still attending to his on-air work. After two years with KDKA, Garroway left for Chicago.
  • 1938
    Age 24
    Garroway began his broadcasting career modestly. Starting at NBC as a page in 1938, he graduated 23rd in a class of 24 from NBC's school for announcers.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1913
    Born
    Born on July 13, 1913.
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