David O. Selznick
Film producer
David O. Selznick
David O. Selznick was an American film producer. He is best known for having produced Gone with the Wind (1939) and Rebecca (1940), and The Third Man (1949), both the former earning him an Oscar for Best Picture.
Biography
David O. Selznick's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of David O. Selznick
News
News abour David O. Selznick from around the web
Montgomery Clift - en bortglömd stjärna - Sourze
Google News - over 5 years
Motspelerskan Jennifer Jones var gift med David Selznick som producerade filmen och han var missnöjd med det mesta men Clift tog de Sicas parti. Selznick bytte namn på filmen och klippte ner den, vilket retade gallfeber på de Sica och Clift
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Vom gezeichneten zum bewegten Bild - NZZ Online
Google News - over 5 years
Das in Walt Disneys Trickfilmstudios geborene Storyboard-System von untereinander kombinierbaren Zeichnungen, die an eine Korktafel geheftet wurden, um den Stand der Dinge zu fixieren, wurde 1939 vom Produzenten David Selznick für die bis dahin
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The 100 Essential Directors Part 3: George Cukor - John Ford - PopMatters
Google News - over 5 years
Cukor honed his talent in New York, directing on the Broadway stage before his childhood friend and mentor, David Selznick, helped him establish himself in Hollywood. So deep was his love of the stage as a child in New York that he frequently skipped
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Festival del Film di Locarno. The Clock (1945) di Vincente Minnelli - ticinolive
Google News - over 5 years
Prima di iniziare le riprese Walker aveva scoperto che la moglie, l'attrice Jennifer Jones, aveva avviato una relazione con il produttore cinematografico David Selznick. Lì era iniziata la sua spirale verso il basso, con una crescente dipendenza
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International Spotlight: A man ahead of his time - Thoroughbred Times
Google News - over 5 years
Without Whitney's financial backing of David Selznick, the classics Gone With the Wind and Rebecca might never have been made. An art collector and philanthropist, Whitney served as an intelligence officer during World War II, was taken prisoner by the
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Marvelous "Moonlight and Magnolias" is a Hilarious Grind - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Playwright Ron Hutchinson takes a witty look at the obsessive production of film producer David Selznick with Moonlight and Magnolias concluding it's five weekend run today at 2 pm @ Alameda's Altarena Playhouse. The play is about the near disaster of
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To Zoom Or Not to Zoom? - San Diego Reader (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Directors and DPs, good ones, too, under the greedy gaze of studio bean counters, brought films in cheaper and faster than even David Selznick could ever imagine. When Peter Fonda was only able to raise a measly $400000 from his dad's friends to make
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Backstage: Corn Stock examines how 'Gone" struck gold - Peoria Journal Star
Google News - over 5 years
The comedy tells the true story of how the desperate and unhappy movie producer David Selznick locked himself, writer Ben Hecht and director Victor Fleming in his office for what became a five-day marathon brainstorming-and-writing session to save a
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The drama of Hollywood's golden age - The Nelson Mail
Google News - over 5 years
It's the golden age of Hollywood and famous producer David Selznick is having a few issues. He's three weeks into shooting his latest historical epic, Gone with the Wind, but the script just isn't working. He decides to fire the director, pull director
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“Film Socialisme”: Humanism and Paranoia - New Yorker (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
There's a cinematic musing on Hollywood—“It's strange that Hollywood was invented by Jews: Adolph Zukor, William Fox, David Selznick, Samuel Goldwyn, Marcus Loew, Carl Laemmle”—accompanied by an image of gangsters in a shootout, as if these Hollywood
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How Ronald Reagan Almost Became A Film Franchise - ChicagoNow (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I contacted Daniel Selznick (son of David Selznick who produced Gone With The Wind) who on the telephone gave me the email of the writer of the screenplay Lindsay Naythons. The following is the entire story from the horse's mouth about how the
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David O. Selznick – King of the Moguls - Legacy.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Born in Pittsburgh as the son of a wealthy silent movie distributor, David Selznick worked for his father as soon as he was able, and moved to Hollywood when he was only 24 to further immerse himself in the movie business
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Frankly, my dear, I don't give a feck - Irish Times
Google News - almost 6 years
David Selznick, who made the movie, was drawn towards a nostalgic, simplified version of Old South aristocracy and flattened out Mitchell's much more complex picture of ethnic and economic diversity in the white South. The novel is far more deeply
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'Moonlight' shines bright over Reston - Fairfaxtimes.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Andy Iquierdo (center, as David Selznick) seeks inspiration from Chuck Dluhy (left, as Ben Hecht) and Michael Clendenin (Victor Fleming) in "Moonlight and Magnolias." David O. Selznick, famed Hollywood movie
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Príbehy z Hollywoodu: Na najväčšieho milovníka sa lásky vykašľali - CAS.sk
Google News - almost 6 years
Náhoda chcela, aby si ho tam všimol hľadač talentov David Selznick z Hollywoodu. Z diváka sa razom stal budúci idol so zmluvou na skvelú kariéru. Skôr, než si zbalil kufre a odišiel do sveta, vo Francúzsku si ho všimol režisér Yves Allégret a natočili
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A cosa stanno lavorando i grandi? Martin Scorsese - www.mauxa.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Prodotto dalla casa indipendente GK Films, quest'opera prende spunto dal racconto illustrato di oltre 500 pagine di David Selznick, vincitore del prestigioso Randolph Caldecott Medal nel 2008, in cui si narra la storia di un ragazzo orfano di dodici
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QUIZ ANSWERS
NYTimes - over 7 years
Questions are on Page 30. THE BACKSTORY 1. B. 2. D. The first, at 11 reels, was ''The Corbet-Fitzsimmons Fight'' (1897). But ''Richard III'' was the first feature-length narrative film produced in the United States, in 1912. 3. B. His sophisticated style of filmmaking became known as the ''Lubitsch touch.'' 4. A. The Court ruled that New York State
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NYTimes article
THE WAY WE LIVE NOW: 04-22-07: ON LANGUAGE; Varmints!
NYTimes - almost 10 years
''I'm not a big-game hunter,'' said Mitt Romney, campaigning in Indianapolis. ''I've made that very clear. I've always been a rodent and rabbit hunter. Small varmints, if you will.'' There's a gem of dialect out of the Wild West. In hundreds of cowboy movies, the man in the white hat -- from William Boyd to John Wayne -- scowls at the rustlers and
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The Truman Show
NYTimes - about 12 years
THE COMPLETE STORIES OF TRUMAN CAPOTE Introduction by Reynolds Price. 297 pp. Random House. $24.95. TOO BRIEF A TREAT The Letters of Truman Capote. Edited by Gerald Clarke. Illustrated. 487 pp. Random House. $27.95. It comes as no surprise to learn, as you do in the preface to ''Too Brief a Treat,'' a new volume of Truman Capote's letters, that the
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HOLIDAY MOVIES; The Moguls Who Put the Holly in Hollywood
NYTimes - over 14 years
WHEN you come to a strange land, what must you do if you wish to be master of ceremonies and king at the box office? Co-opt the sentiments and the ritual occasions of the natives. Case in point, Christmas: act as if you've always owned it. Little wonder, then, that as Jewish businessmen slipped from the garment industry into the movies in the early
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of David O. Selznick
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1965
    Age 62
    Selznick died in 1965 following several heart attacks, and was interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.
    More Details Hide Details There he joined his older brother Myron Selznick (who had died in 1944) in the family crypt. For his contribution to the motion picture industry, David O. Selznick has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7000 Hollywood Blvd, in front of the historic Hollywood Roosevelt hotel.
  • FORTIES
  • 1949
    Age 46
    In 1949 he married actress Jennifer Jones that he discovered early in her career and mentored, and they had one daughter, Mary Jennifer Selznick (1954–1976), who committed suicide by jumping from a 20th-floor window in Los Angeles on May 11, 1976.
    More Details Hide Details Selznick was an amphetamine user, and would often dictate long, rambling memos to his directors, writers, investors, staff and stars. The documentary Shadowing The Third Man relates that Selznick introduced The Third Man director Carol Reed to the use of amphetamine, which allowed Reed to bring the picture in below budget and on schedule by filming nearly 22 hours at a time. Selznick was a Republican. On October 18, 1944, the Hollywood Committee, led by Selznick and Cecil B. DeMille held the Hollywood for Dewey Rally in the Los Angeles Coliseum in support of the Dewey-Bricker ticket, as well as Governor Earl Warren of California, who would be Dewey's running mate in 1948. The gathering drew 93,000, with Lionel Barrymore as the master of ceremonies, and short speeches by Hedda Hopper and Walt Disney. Celebrity attendees included Don Ameche, Edward Arnold, William Bendix, George Burns, Gracie Burns, Gary Cooper, Irene Dunne, Clark Gable, Cary Grant, Fred MacMurray, Raymond Massey, Adolphe Menjou, Ray Milland, George Murphy, Walter Pidgeon, William Powell, Ginger Rogers, Randolph Scott, and Barbara Stanwyck.
  • 1948
    Age 45
    "I stopped making films in 1948 because I was tired," Selznick later wrote. "I had been producing, at the time, for twenty years.Additionally it was crystal clear that the motion-picture business was in for a terrible beating from television and other new forms of entertainment, and I thought it a good time to take stock and to study objectively the obviously changing public tastes.Certainly I had no intention of staying away from production for nine years."
    More Details Hide Details Selznick spent most of the 1950s nurturing the career of his second wife, Jennifer Jones. His last film, the big budget production A Farewell to Arms (1957) starring Jones and Rock Hudson, was ill-received. But in 1954, he ventured into television, producing a two-hour extravaganza called Light's Diamond Jubilee, which, in true Selznick fashion, made TV history by being telecast simultaneously on all four TV networks: CBS, NBC, ABC, and DuMont.
  • 1944
    Age 41
    In 1944, he formed The Selznick Studio and returned to producing pictures with the huge success Since You Went Away, which he also wrote.
    More Details Hide Details He followed that with the Hitchcock films Spellbound (1945) and The Paradine Case (1947), as well as Portrait of Jennie (1948), a vehicle for Jennifer Jones. He also developed film projects and sold the packages to other producers. Among the movies that he developed but then sold was Hitchcock's Notorious (1946). In 1949 he co-produced the Carol Reed picture The Third Man with Alexander Korda. Gone with the Wind overshadowed the rest of Selznick's career. Later, he was convinced that he had wasted his life trying to out do it. The closest he came to matching the film was with Duel in the Sun (1946) featuring future wife Jennifer Jones in the role of the primary character Pearl. With a huge budget, the film is known for causing moral upheaval because of the then risqué script written by Selznick. And though it was a troublesome shoot with a number of directors, the film would be a major success. The film was the second highest grossing film of 1947 and was the first movie that Martin Scorsese saw, inspiring Scorsese's own directorial career.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1940
    Age 37
    In 1940 he produced his second Best Picture Oscar winner in a row, Rebecca, the first Hollywood production for British director Alfred Hitchcock.
    More Details Hide Details Selznick had brought Hitchcock over from England, launching the director's American career. Rebecca was Hitchcock's only film to win Best Picture. After Rebecca, Selznick closed Selznick International Pictures and took some time off. His business activities included the loan of his contracted artists to other studios, including Alfred Hitchcock, Ingrid Bergman, Vivien Leigh and Joan Fontaine.
  • 1935
    Age 32
    Despite his output of successful movies at MGM, Paramount Pictures, and RKO Pictures, Selznick longed to be an independent producer with his own studio. In 1935 he realized that goal by leasing RKO Culver City Studios & back lot, formed Selznick International Pictures, and distributed his films through United Artists.
    More Details Hide Details His successes continued with classics such as The Garden of Allah (1936), The Prisoner of Zenda (1937), A Star Is Born (1937), Nothing Sacred (1937), The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938), The Young in Heart (1938), Made for Each Other (1939), Intermezzo (1939) and Gone with the Wind (1939), which remains the highest grossing film of all time (adjusted for inflation). Gone with the Wind won eight Oscars and two special awards. Selznick also won the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award that same year.
  • 1933
    Age 30
    In 1933 he returned to MGM where his father-in-law, Louis B. Mayer, was studio CEO.
    More Details Hide Details Mayer established a second prestige production unit for David, parallel to that of powerful Irving Thalberg, who was in poor health. Selznick's unit output included the all star cast movie Dinner at Eight (1933), David Copperfield (1935), Anna Karenina (1935), and A Tale of Two Cities (1935).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1930
    Age 27
    In 1930 Selznick married Mayer and after living in a series of rented houses they moved into an estate purchased for them by Mayer’s father and designed by architect Roland Coate in Beverly Hills, California in 1933–1934. They separated in 1945 and divorced in 1948.
    More Details Hide Details They had two sons, Jeffrey Selznick (1932–1997) and Daniel Selznick (1936 -).
  • 1928
    Age 25
    In 1928 Selznick began an on-again off-again affair with Jean Arthur, one of the successful actresses under him at Paramount that had already been in pictures for five years, while simultaneously dating Irene Gladys Mayer, daughter of MGM mogul Louis B. Mayer.
    More Details Hide Details
    He left MGM for Paramount Pictures in 1928, where he worked until 1931, when he joined RKO as Head of Production.
    More Details Hide Details David Selznick's years at RKO were fruitful, and he worked on many films, including A Bill of Divorcement (1932), What Price Hollywood? (1932), Rockabye (1932), Our Betters (1933), and King Kong (1933). While at RKO, he also gave George Cukor his directing break.
  • 1926
    Age 23
    In 1926, Selznick moved to Hollywood, and with the help of his father's connections, got a job as an assistant story editor at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1902
    Born
    Born on May 10, 1902.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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