Dexter Gordon
American jazz saxophonist
Dexter Gordon
Dexter Gordon was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. He was among the earliest tenor players to adapt the bebop musical language of people like Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Bud Powell to the instrument. His studio and live performance career spanned over more than 40 years. Gordon's height was 6 feet 6 inches (198 cm), so he was also known as "Long Tall Dexter" and "Sophisticated Giant".
Biography
Dexter Gordon's personal information overview.
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News
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Barry Harris, Pizza Express Jazz Club - review - Evening Standard
Google News - over 5 years
A contemporary of Bud Powell and Miles Davis, Barry Harris is a brilliant pianist and theoretician who has worked with Sonny Stitt, Dexter Gordon, and Cannonball Adderley and taught a whole generation of later stars including Lee Morgan, Joe Henderson
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Tobias Wolff: 'I still feel as though I'm faking it' - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
He started out copying, you know, Dexter Gordon or Coleman Hawkins. After a bit of that you hopefully begin to find your own voice." In Old School, Wolff even went so far as to ventriloquise his idols. The book arranges entertaining cameos for the
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The Revolution Will Be Jazz: Giacomo Gates Celebrates The Music Of Gil Scott-Heron - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
He has been influenced, by his own admission, by horn players like Dexter Gordon, Lou Donaldson and Lester Young, When he uses his voice as an instrument it is clear he has a horn player's mindset. Lombardozzi's guitar accompaniment is especially
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Jerry Leiber tribute - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
The two young men used to go to r-and-b and jazz clubs on LA's Central Avenue, and hung out at house parties with jazz musicians such as Ray Brown, Dexter Gordon and Lester Young. In 1954 they hooked up with Johnny Otis, an R&B pioneer and music
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Primary results galore and Fey back on the campaign trail - Weekly Volcano
Google News - over 5 years
With only a handful of ballots left to count Washington holds a 56-vote lead over Golding In the race for Tacoma School Board Position 3, University of Puget Sound Professor Dexter Gordon leads local businessman Scott Heinze by 825 votes,
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LA area concert presales - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
... Nederlander's upcomping events in the LA Area. Enjoy, and remember to PLAY IT LOUD. By Kristen Lowman Kristen Lowman is Your Girl In Music, in the same way that Dexter Gordon was "Our Man in Paris," only she's a girl who goes to 11 reporting under
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Incumbent behind in early Tacoma schools counting - TheNewsTribune.com
Google News - over 5 years
University of Puget Sound professor Dexter Gordon and Scott Heinze, a businessman active in the volunteer group Communities in Schools, will advance to the November general election, early returns indicate
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Tacoma schools need better leadership to address lackluster performance - TheNewsTribune.com
Google News - over 5 years
The New Tribune's editorial board recently told voters that Dexter Gordon and Karen Vialle are extraordinary candidates for the Tacoma School Board (editorial, 7-25). Subsequent discussion in these pages focused on the achievement gap, the disparate
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Frank Foster, Jazz Saxophonist, Composer and Arranger, Dies at 82
NYTimes - over 5 years
Frank Foster, a saxophonist, composer and arranger who helped shape the sound of the Count Basie Orchestra during its popular heyday in the 1950s and '60s and later led expressive large and small groups of his own, died on Tuesday at his home in Chesapeake, Va. He was 82. The cause was complications of kidney failure, said his wife of 45 years,
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The Princess Of Montpensier - Little White Lies
Google News - over 5 years
Bertrand Tavernier is a great cineaste, best known for such films as Policier L.627, World War I drama Life and Nothing But and jazz movie 'Round Midnight with Dexter Gordon. The Princess of Montpensier is a period romance-cum-tragedy which follows the
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Ernie Krivda - Blues for Pekar - Capri Records - Audiophile Audition
Google News - over 5 years
“More Than You Know” lets Ernie pour out passionate ballad changes that have the power of a Dexter Gordon or an early Sonny Rollins. Krivda clearly shows that he can play with the heavyweights. “Valse Hot” and “Darn That Dream” continue the winning
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A Drummer Goes Beyond a Legacy - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Even as he was on retainer with Davis, Mr. Foster said, he found time to play the Village Vanguard with standouts like Milt Jackson, Tommy Flanagan, Dexter Gordon and Red Garland. His originals — like “Brandyn” and “Bonnie Rose,” written for his son
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Ohr-O'Keefe Museum of Art plans a 'jazzy' summer - Press-Register - al.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Other jazz greats shown here are the brilliant but haunted trumpeter/vocalist Chet Baker and the great tenor sax-man (and Oscar-nominated actor) Dexter Gordon, whose image — used for one of Gordon's most popular albums —can be seen in the background
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Exclusive: Entire History of Black ... - Eurweb.com
Google News - over 5 years
The film comes from director Don McGlynn, a 55-year-old white American expatriate living in Denmark who had made a number of music films – including documentaries about Howlin' Wolf, Charles Mingus and Dexter Gordon. He was approached to direct
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Music: David Bixler - kypost.com
Google News - over 5 years
A Wisconsin native, Bixler studied Classical piano as a child but was inspired by the legendary Dexter Gordon to take up the saxophone, which led him to the music program at Indiana University. After graduation, he relocated to New York City,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dexter Gordon
    TWENTIES
  • 1990
    In addition, he had a non-speaking role in the 1990 film Awakenings, which was posthumously released.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1987
    He was a sideman on Tony Bennett's 1987 album, Berlin.
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  • 1986
    Gordon's most memorable works from the decade were not in music but in film. He starred in the 1986 movie Round Midnight as "Dale Turner", an expatriate jazz musician in Paris during the late 1950s based loosely on Lester Young and Bud Powell.
    More Details Hide Details That portrayal earned him a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Actor.
    In 1986, he was named a member and officer of the French Order of Arts and Letters by the Ministry of Culture in France.
    More Details Hide Details During the 1980s, Gordon was weakened by emphysema. He remained a popular attraction at concerts and festivals, although his live appearances and recording dates would soon become infrequent.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1978
    In 1978 and 1980, Gordon was the Down Beat Musician of the Year and in 1980 he was inducted into the Jazz Hall of Fame.
    More Details Hide Details The US Government honored him with a Congressional Commendation, a Dexter Gordon Day in Washington DC, and a National Endowment for the Arts award for Lifetime Achievement.
    In addition to the Homecoming album, a series of live albums was released by Blue Note from his stands at Keystone Corner in San Francisco during 1978 and 1979.
    More Details Hide Details They featured Gordon, George Cables, Rufus Reid, and Eddie Gladden. The sensation of Gordon's return, renewed promotion of the classic jazz catalogs of the Savoy and Blue Note record labels, and the continued efforts of Art Blakey through 1970s and early 1980s, have been credited with reviving interest in swinging, melodic, acoustically-based classic jazz sounds after the Fusion jazz era that saw an emphasis on electronic sounds and contemporary pop influences.
  • 1976
    Gordon finally returned to the United States for good in 1976.
    More Details Hide Details He appeared with Woody Shaw, Ronnie Mathews, Stafford James, and Louis Hayes, for a gig at the Village Vanguard in New York that was dubbed his "homecoming." It was recorded and released by Columbia Records under that title. He noted: "There was so much love and elation; sometimes it was a little eerie at the Vanguard. After the last set they'd turn on the lights and nobody would move."
  • OTHER
  • 1961
    Gordon signed to Blue Note Records in 1961.
    More Details Hide Details He initially commuted from Los Angeles to New York to record, but took up residence when he regained the cabaret card that allowed him to perform where alcohol was served. The Jazz Gallery hosted his first New York performance in twelve years. The Blue Note association was to produce a steady flow of albums for several years, some of which gained iconic status. His New York renaissance was marked by Doin' Allright, Dexter Calling, Go, and A Swingin' Affair. The first two were recorded over three days in May 1961 with Freddie Hubbard, Horace Parlan, Kenny Drew, Paul Chambers, George Tucker, Al Harewood, and Philly Joe Jones. The last two were recorded in August 1962, with a rhythm section that featured Blue Note regulars Sonny Clark, Butch Warren and Billy Higgins. Of the two Go! was an expressed favorite. The albums showed his assimilation of the hard bop and modal styles that had developed during his years on the west coast, and the influence of John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins, whom he had influenced before. The stay in New York turned out to be short lived, as Gordon got offers for engagements in England, then Europe, that resulted in a fourteen-year stay. Soon after recording A Swingin' Affair, he was gone.
  • 1960
    Gordon was a saxophonist performing Freddie Redd's music for the Los Angeles production of Jack Gelber's play The Connection in 1960, replacing Jackie McLean.
    More Details Hide Details He contributed two compositions, Ernie's Tune and I Want More to the score and later recorded them for his album Dexter Calling.
    He recorded The Resurgence of Dexter Gordon in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details His recordings document a meander into a smooth West Coast style that lacked the impact of his bebop era recordings or his subsequent Blue Note recordings. The decade saw Gordon's first entry into the world of drama. He appeared as a member (uncredited) of Art Hazzard's band in the 1950 film Young Man with a Horn. He appeared in an uncredited and overdubbed role as a member of a prison band in the movie Unchained, filmed inside Chino.
  • 1959
    He was one of the initial sax players for the Onzy Matthews big band in 1959, along with Curtis Amy.
    More Details Hide Details Gordon continued to champion Matthews' band after he left Los Angeles for New York, but left for Europe before getting a chance to record with that band.
    The latter part of the decade saw him in and out of prison until his final release from Folsom Prison in 1959.
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  • 1953
    After an incarceration at Chino Prison during 1953-55, he recorded the albums Daddy Plays the Horn and Dexter Blows Hot and Cool in 1955 and played as a sideman on the Stan Levey album, This Time the Drum's on Me.
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  • 1952
    The Chase And The Steeplechase, from February 1952, was the last recording of Gordon with Wardell Gray.
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  • 1949
    By 1949, Gordon was again based in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details His recorded output and live appearances declined as heroin addiction and legal troubles took their toll.
  • 1947
    In December 1947, Gordon returned to New York and the Savoy label (Settin' the Pace, So Easy, Dexter's Riff, Dextrose, Dexter's Mood, Index, Dextivity, Wee Dot, Lion Roars).
    More Details Hide Details Through the mid-to-late 1940s he continued to work as a sideman on sessions led by Benny Carter, Ben Webster, Ralph Burns, Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Gerry Mulligan, Wynonie Harris, Leo Parker, and Tadd Dameron.
    During his stint in Los Angeles, he became known for his saxophone duels with fellow tenorman Wardell Gray, which were a popular concert attraction documented in recordings made between 1947 and 1952 (The Hunt, Move, The Chase, The Steeplechase).
    More Details Hide Details The Hunt gained literary fame from its mention in Jack Kerouac's On The Road, which also contains descriptions of wild tenormen jamming in Los Angeles. Cherokee, Byas a Drink, and Disorder at the Border are other live recordings of the Gray/Gordon duo from the same concert as The Hunt.
    By mid-1947, he was in Los Angeles, recording for Ross Russell's Dial label (Mischievous Lady, Lullaby in Rhythm, The Chase, Iridescence, It's the Talk of the Town, Bikini, A Ghost of a Chance, Sweet and Lovely).
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  • 1945
    His recordings during 1945-46 included Blow Mr. Dexter, Dexter's Deck, Dexter's Minor Mad, Long Tall Dexter, Dexter Rides Again, I Can't Escape From You, and Dexter Digs In.
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    By late 1945 he was recording under his own name for the Savoy label.
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  • 1944
    By late 1944, Gordon was resident in New York and a featured soloist in the Billy Eckstine big band (If That's The Way You Feel, I Want To Talk About You, Blowin' the Blues Away, Opus X, I'll Wait And Pray, The Real Thing Happened To Me, Lonesome Lover Blues, I Love the Rhythm in a Riff), and later was featured on recordings by Dizzy Gillespie (Blue 'n' Boogie, Groovin' High) and Sir Charles Thompson (Takin' Off, If I Had You, 20th Century Blues, The Street Beat).
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  • 1943
    In 1943 he was featured, alongside Harry "Sweets" Edison, in recordings under Nat Cole for a small label not affected by the strike.
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  • 1940
    Between December 1940 and 1943, Gordon was a member of Lionel Hampton's band, playing in a saxophone section alongside Illinois Jacquet and Marshal Royal.
    More Details Hide Details During 1944 he was featured in the Fletcher Henderson band, followed by the Louis Armstrong band, before joining Billy Eckstine. The 1942–44 musicians' strike curtailed the recording of the Hampton, Henderson, and Armstrong bands; however, they were recorded on V-Discs produced by the Army for broadcast and distribution among overseas troops.
  • 1923
    Dexter Keith Gordon was born on February 27, 1923 in Los Angeles, California.
    More Details Hide Details His father, Dr. Frank Gordon, was one of the first African American doctors in Los Angeles who arrived in 1918 after graduating from Howard Medical School in Washington, D.C. Among his patients were Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton. Dexter’s mother, Gwendolyn Baker, was the daughter of Captain Edward Baker, one of the five African American Medal of Honor recipients in the Spanish–American War. Gordon played clarinet from the age of 13, before switching to saxophone (initially alto, then tenor) at 15. While still at school, he played in bands with such contemporaries as Chico Hamilton and Buddy Collette.
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