Diahann Carroll
American actor and singer
Diahann Carroll
Diahann Carroll is an American actress and singer. Having appeared in some of the earliest major studio films to feature black casts such as Carmen Jones and Porgy and Bess, she starred in 1968's Julia, one of the first series on American television to star a black woman in a non-stereotypical role. Later she created the role of Dominique Deveraux on the popular prime time soap opera, Dynasty.
Biography
Diahann Carroll's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
News
News abour Diahann Carroll from around the web
How Phylicia Rashad's Mother Protected Her From The Malice Of Legal Segregation
Huffington Post - about 1 month
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); When actress Phylicia Rashad was a child, segregation was legal in the United States. Growing up as a young African-American girl in 1950s Texas was a hostile experience ― “It wasn’t like people loved the color of your skin,” Rashad tells “Oprah: Where Are They Now?” ― but Rashad’s mother made a conscious choice to protect her two daughters as much as possible from the harsh reality. “My mother was determined that her children would not be scarred by this ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Encino Man
Huffington Post - 4 months
By no grand design, the last two books I've read--Philip Roth's American Pastoral and Bruce Springsteen's Born to Run--while disparate in tone and content, both use the story of richly detailed, postwar New Jersey upbringings to tell the story of mid-century America. Both books by my heroes left me in awe and with a classic case of writer's schadenfreude. (For the record, that's different from Shonda-freude, which is writer's envy about not having a show on ABC's Thursday night lineup). In my case, my envy wasn't just about their prodigious storytelling talents or anger that they were able to get past page three of writing a book (though that's obviously part of it. Have we met?). But for me, the real envy came from their richly detailed sense of place. Whether it's the kosher butcher shops or glove factories of Jewish Newark or the emotional bipolarity of the mixed Italian-Irish homes of Freehold or the girls in their summer clothes walking the boardwalk in mid 60's Asbury, th ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Forced to Provide Service With a Smile
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Not everyone has a desk job. Some people wait tables, clean bathrooms, work as nannies, or push drink carts through an airplane's passenger cabin. Others may be adjunct professors, nurses, bus drivers, or garbagemen. Each and every service job is accompanied by occupational hazards that the general public blithely ignores. And yet, the working class provides plenty of material for playwrights and screenwriters. From bus drivers like Ralph Kramden (The Honeymooners) to teachers like Jean Brodie (The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie); candy stripers, blue collar (and no collar) workers find a place in our culture. Bay area audiences recently attended the American premiere of Penelope Skinner's dramedy, Fred's Diner, at the Magic Theatre and Marisa Wegrzyn's poignant look at exhausted flight attendants in the Aurora Theatre Company's production of Mud Blue Sky. Several years ago, TheatreWorks Silicon Valley staged Joan Holden's adaptation of Barbara Ehrenreich's nonfiction ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Paley Center honors Quincy Jones, Diahann Carroll at black television tribute
LATimes - over 1 year
In what seems to be a historic year for diversity on television, increasing the number of people of color in Hollywood continues to be at the center of conversation. Monday night was no different as the Paley Center for Media hosted a Hollywood Tribute to African American Achievements in Television...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Not Quite the Big One: 'Sanford and Son' 38 Years Later
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Thirty-eight years ago this week, Sanford and Son ended its historic television run after 136 groundbreaking episodes. The show was anchored by the incomparable Redd Foxx and then-rising-star Demond Wilson. While Sanford and Son does not hold the distinction of being the first primetime African-American television show, it's arrival signaled a turn toward a new wave of a self-authenticated black American experience presented to television audiences. Sanford and Son introduced a level of self-assuredness in tone and subject that is all over the current flood of ethnically led and focused programming. Well before Fresh Off the Boat Tuesdays, Empire/Black-ish Wednesdays or Shondaland Thursdays, Fred G. S-A-N-F-O-R-D, period and Lamont showed us their finest antiques and trinkets on Fridays. Reaching the place where culturally aware shows were accepted and embraced right alongside their mainstream counterparts was a slow and at times a painful process. June 28, 1951: The Columba Bro ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
'Empire' Is Showing Us A New Way To Think About Black TV Characters
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
The Fox drama "Empire" reigned supreme Wednesday evening, capping off its breakout first season with a two-hour finale whose latter half drew 17.6 million viewers, according to Associated Press reports. That's about an 18 percent jump from the show’s March 11 episode, which 14.9 million people watched. It's also the greatest number of people to watch the first-season finale of a TV drama since "Grey's Anatomy" in 2005. Since its Jan. 7 debut, “Empire” has stirred up numerous conversations about show creators Lee Daniels and Danny Strong, and the ways in which they've addressed various topics -- some of them drawn from Daniels’ own traumatic early life -- that often go unmentioned on black television. “’Empire’ is resisting the impulse to present the typical one-dimensional, stereotypical characters we have seen in the past around representations of African Americans,” said Robin R. Means Coleman, an author and communications professor at the University of Michigan, told The Huffi ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
For LaTanya Richardson Jackson, a 'dream' role
San Francisco Chronicle - about 3 years
Richardson Jackson, who was last on Broadway in the Tony-winning 2009 revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," was asked on Saturday to take over for Diahann Carroll in next month's Broadway revival of "A Raisin in the Sun." Director Kenny Leon, who asked her to step in, didn't even know she was in New York when he dialed her cell phone. Set in the late 1950s in a rundown South Side Chicago apartment, "A Raisin in the Sun" deals with the hopes and disappointments of a black family trying to find a better life in a white neighborhood. The original Broadway production in 1959 featured Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, Claudia McNeil and Diana Sands, all who reunited for a 1961 film adaptation. The last Broadway revival occurred in 2004, starring Diddy (Sean Combs), Phylicia Rashad, Sanaa Lathan and Audra McDonald.
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Why Did Diahann Carroll Break Out On Denzel?
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Maybe it was just too good to be true. Diahann Carroll’s much anticipated return to The Great White Way — after 30+ years — isn’t going to happen after all. The acclaimed actress, set to play opposite Denzel Washington in a new revival of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, has quit the show.
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
These Throwback Pics Of Black Hollywood Are Making Us Excited For Awards Season (PHOTOS)
Huffington Post - about 3 years
The Golden Globes are just days away, marking the official start to Hollywood awards season. And everyone knows that the anticipation of seeing what the stars are wearing is just as -- if not more -- exciting as seeing who walks away with a statue. To that end, we've dug up a few awesome throwback photos, via the Vintage Black Glamour Tumblr, of stylish black stars hitting the awards circuit. The old-school razzle dazzle has us pumped for all the award shows on the horizon. What about you? Check 'em out below! Diana Ross at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in 1978 attending the Motion Picture Pioneer of the Year Awards dinner honoring Dr. Jules Stein. Dr. Stein was the founder of an entertainment empire that began with MCA, the talent agency turned music and film behemoth. Photo: Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage. Cicely Tyson answers a reporter’s questions on the red carpet as she arrives at the #Oscars on March 27, 1973. Ms. Tyson was nominated in the Best Actress category for her role i ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Issa Rae Backs New Webseries That Aims To Show Black Women As More Than Stereotypes
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Our favorite 'Awkward Black Girl' Issa Rae is on a roll dishing out project after project. Not only is she working on an HBO series, and starring in a few webseries, she's also producing and curating content on her YouTube channel. The latest project she's behind is entitled "Black Actress," and falls right in line with an issue that hits close to home for African-American actresses and creatives trying to make it in Hollywood. The webseries, created, written by and starring actress Andrea Lewis, features cameos and commentary from the likes of Tatyana Ali, Naturi Naughton, Essence Atkins, and Jenifer Lewis. "My channel started off with 'Awkward Black Girl' but I always wanted to be a curator of great content, so when I saw "Black Actress" it was just like 'wow this story is hilarious.' I know so many women that have gone through this as an actress," said Rae. The mockumentary style series centers around “Kori Bailey,” played by Lewis, as she "struggles with the pursuit of getting ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Diahann Carroll honored for staying power
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
Beverly Johnson, Angela Bassett, Regina King and Anika Noni Rose were in attendance to applaud Carroll and fellow honoree Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the first African American president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The affair was meant to "celebrate female empowerment and to help open doors for future accomplishments," Edmonds said. A Tony Award winner, four-time Emmy nominee and Oscar nominee and the first black actress to star in her own prime-time series, "Julia," Carroll says there is still one role she has yet to conquer: "I would love to be a part of a studio that tells our stories and has a means of growing."
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Diahann Carroll, Actress And Quick-Witted Honoree Says 'I Certainly Don't Feel Like An Icon'
Huffington Post - over 3 years
LOS ANGELES -- LOS ANGELES (AP) — At 78-years-old Diahann Carroll keeps a sense of humor. "I don't think I realize what the passage of time really means until people talk about things that I did in the '50s and I wonder 'Who the hell are they talking about?,'" the actress, singer and Golden Globe-winner said while being honored at a House of Flowers dinner Saturday evening. Beverly Johnson, Angela Bassett, Regina King and Anika Noni Rose were in attendance to applaud Carroll and fellow honoree Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the first African American president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The dinner, hosted by television producer Tracey Edmonds and film and television producer Debra Martin Chase, was held at Edmonds' home. Fellow honoree Isaacs said the evening made her feel "on top of the world" and described her new post as AMPAS president as "going from zero to 60 in four seconds." Conceptualized by Chase and deemed House of Flowers after Truman Capote's Broadway ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Emmys live up to unpredictable reputation
Blue Ridge Now - over 3 years
The Emmys lived up to its reputation as the least predictable entertainment awards show. Television's annual night of honors, where the AMC drama "Breaking Bad" and ABC comedy "Modern Family" were judged the industry's finest on Sunday night, mixed in surprises with expected winners, and ended some winning streaks while extending others. Newcomer Netflix made its presence felt, but not in the splashy way it had hoped for. "Nobody in America is winning their office pool," host Neil Patrick Harris said late in the CBS telecast from the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. The best drama win for "Breaking Bad" was its first ever, and Anna Gunn won a best supporting actress award for playing the wife of Bryan Cranston's Walter White character, the chemistry teacher turned drug lord whom the series revolves around. Cranston was denied a bid for his fourth drama acting award for the show. It was splendid publicity for "Breaking Bad," which airs its series finale next Sunday. "What a way to ...
Article Link:
Blue Ridge Now article
FROM DIAHANN CARROLL TO KERRY WASHINGTON
Yahoo News - over 3 years
Diahann Carroll happily passed the torch to Kerry Washington as black actresses starring in their own TV series and nominated for Emmys.
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
Emmys 2013: Performers & Presenters Complete List!
Just Jared - over 3 years
It is set to be a great night celebrating television at the 2013 Emmy Awards airing live on Sunday (September 22) from the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live in Los Angeles. The evening will featuring several musical performances including one from Carrie Underwood honoring the music of the 1960s (she has hinted she’ll sing a Beatles song) and another from Elton John as a tribute to Behind the Candelabra‘s subject Liberace. Tributes to the late Cory Monteith, James Gandolfini, Jean Stapleton (All in the Family), Jonathan Winters (Mork and Mindy), and producer Gary David Goldberg (Family Ties) are all set in place as well. Make sure to watch the 2013 Emmy Awards, hosted by Neil Patrick Harris, airing TONIGHT at 8/7c on CBS! Click inside to check out the complete list of presenters… 2013 Emmy Awards Presenters List Malin Akerman Stephen Amell Will Arnett Alec Baldwin Andre Braugher Connie Britton Dan Bucatinsky Diahann Carroll Don Cheadle Emilia Calrke Bryan Cranston ...
Article Link:
Just Jared article
Tina Fey-Amy Poehler among Emmys' female presenter pairings
Yahoo News - over 3 years
By Jethro Nededog LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) - Producers are hoping to create some memorable moments by uniting four pairs of women during the 65th Emmy Awards airing Sunday, September 22 at 8/7c. Scheduled to present together are Kerry Washington and Diahann Carroll; Tina Fey and Amy Poehler; Zooey Deschanel and Emily Deschanel; and Allison Janney with Anna Faris. Each pair is notable in its own way: Washington and Carroll represent Emmy-nominated black actresses from two generations. "Saturday Night Live" alums Fey and Poehler reunite after co-hosting the 70th Golden Globes. ...
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Diahann Carroll
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2014
    Age 78
    Carroll was scheduled to return to the Broadway stage in the 2014 revival of A Raisin in the Sun as Mama, but withdrew prior to opening citing the demands of the rehearsal and performance schedule.
    More Details Hide Details Carroll was born Carol Diahann Johnson in the Bronx, New York, to John Johnson, of Aiken, South Carolina, and Mabel (Faulk), of Bladenboro, North Carolina. When Carroll was an infant, the family moved to Harlem, where she grew up. She attended Music and Art High School, and was a classmate of Billy Dee Williams. In many interviews about her childhood, Diahann Carroll recalls her parents' support of her and that they enrolled her in dance, singing, and modeling classes. By the time Diahann Carroll was 15, she was modeling for Ebony. She was tall, with a lean model's build. After graduating from high school, Diahann Carroll attended New York University, majoring in sociology. At the age of 18, Carroll got her big break when she appeared as a contestant on the Dumont Television Network program, Chance of a Lifetime, hosted by Dennis James.
  • 2013
    Age 77
    Diahann Carroll was present on stage for the 2013 Emmy Awards, to briefly speak about her retrospective of being the first African American nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2010
    Age 74
    In 2010, Carroll was featured in UniGlobe Entertainment's breast cancer docudrama entitled, 1 a Minute, and appeared as Nana in two Lifetime movies: At Risk and The Front, movie adaptations of two Patricia Cornwell novels.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2008
    Age 72
    In December 2008, Carroll was cast in USA Network’s series White Collar as June, the savvy widow who rents out her guest room to Neal Caffrey.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2006
    Age 70
    In 2006, she appeared in the television medical drama Grey's Anatomy as Jane Burke, the demanding mother of Dr. Preston Burke.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2001
    Age 65
    In 2001, Carroll made her animation début in The Legend of Tarzan, in which she voiced Queen La, an evil sorceress and ruler of the ancient city of Opar.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1996
    Age 60
    In 1996, Carroll starred as the crazed silent movie star Norma Desmond in the Canadian production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical version of the classic film Sunset Boulevard.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1995
    Age 59
    In a reunion with Billy Dee Williams in the TV series Lonesome Dove in 1995, she played Mrs. Greyson, the wife of Williams' character.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1991
    Age 55
    The union, which Carroll admitted was turbulent, had a legal separation in 1991, reconciliation, and divorce in 1996.
    More Details Hide Details Carroll for a time also dated and was engaged to British television host and producer David Frost. Awards Nominations
  • 1989
    Age 53
    She received her third Emmy nomination in 1989 for the recurring role of Marion Gilbert in A Different World.
    More Details Hide Details In 1991, Carrol played the role of Eleanor Potter, the wife of Jimmy Potter, portrayed by Chuck Patterson, in The Five Heartbeats, a musical drama film in which Jimmy manages a vocal group. In this role, Carroll was a doting, concerned, and protective wife alongside actor and musician Robert Townsend, Leon Michael Wright, and others.
  • 1987
    Age 51
    Carroll's fourth marriage was to singer Vic Damone in 1987.
    More Details Hide Details
    Carroll remained on the show until 1987, simultaneously making several appearances on its short-lived spin-off, The Colbys.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1984
    Age 48
    In 1984, Carroll joined the nighttime soap opera Dynasty as the jetsetter Dominique Deveraux, half-sister of Blake Carrington.
    More Details Hide Details Her high-profile role on Dynasty also reunited her with schoolmate Billy Dee Williams, who briefly played her onscreen husband Brady Lloyd.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1975
    Age 39
    In 1975, she married Robert DeLeon, a managing editor of Jet.
    More Details Hide Details She was widowed two years later when DeLeon was killed in a car crash.
  • 1968
    Age 32
    That role won her the Golden Globe Award for "Best Actress In A Television Series" in 1968, and a nomination for an Emmy Award in 1969, which TV Guide incorrectly claimed made her the first African American to earn an Emmy nomination.
    More Details Hide Details Some of her earlier work included appearances on shows hosted by Jack Paar, Merv Griffin, Johnny Carson, Judy Garland, and Ed Sullivan, and on The Hollywood Palace variety show.
    Carroll is known for her title role in the 1968 television series Julia, which made her the first African American actress to star in her own television series where she did not play a domestic worker.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1962
    Age 26
    In 1962, she won the Tony Award for best actress (a first for a black woman) for the role of Barbara Woodruff in the Samuel A. Taylor and Richard Rodgers musical No Strings.
    More Details Hide Details In 1974, she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for Claudine.
  • 1961
    Age 25
    She starred with Sidney Poitier, Paul Newman, and Joanne Woodward in the 1961 film Paris Blues.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1960
    Age 24
    She made a guest appearance in the series Peter Gunn, in the 1960 episode "Sing a Song of Murder".
    More Details Hide Details
    Carroll has been married four times and became the mother of a daughter in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details She is a breast cancer survivor and activist.
  • 1959
    Age 23
    In 1959, she played Clara in the film version of George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess, but her character's singing parts were dubbed by opera singer Loulie Jean Norman.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1954
    Age 18
    On the show which aired January 8, 1954, Carroll took the $1,000 top prize for her rendition of the Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein song, "Why Was I Born?
    More Details Hide Details " She went on to win the following four weeks. Engagements at Manhattan's Café Society and Latin Quarter nightclubs soon followed. Carroll's film debut was a supporting role in Carmen Jones (1954) as a rival to the sultry lead character, Dorothy Dandridge. That same year, she starred in the Broadway musical, House of Flowers.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1935
    Born
    Born on July 17, 1935.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)