Dick Modzelewski
American football player and coach
Dick Modzelewski
Richard Blair Modzelewski is a former American football defensive tackle in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, Pittsburgh Steelers, New York Giants, and the Cleveland Browns. He also served as interim head coach of the Browns in the final game of the 1977 season. Modzelewski was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993.
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Dick Modzelewski's personal information overview.
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Southwest Pennsylvania: Breeding Ground for the NCAA and NFL - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
... Pro Bowler and two-time AFC defensive player of the year, Taylor was also named to the NFL 2000's All-Decade team and has recorded over 100 sacks in his career; Dick Modzelewski, an All-American at Maryland and the Outland Trophy winner in 1952
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Lazy Days and Tuesday - GiantInsider.net (subscription)
Google News - over 5 years
1), the old Giants defensive tackle Dick Modzelewski recounted how refreshing it was to be traded to the Giants in 1956 after dealing with a summer madman like Steelers coach Walt Kiesling. "I was happy because the situation at the Steelers was
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Robustelli Brought Defense to the Fore - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
With Robustelli and Jim Katcavage at defensive end, Sam Huff at middle linebacker, and Rosey Grier and Dick Modzelewski at defensive tackle, the Giants' defensive unit developed a rabid following. Indeed, with most of this unit intact,
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Robustelli's Giants gave birth to a cheer - Forsyth County News Online
Google News - over 5 years
The great defensive line of Robustelli, Roosevelt Grier, Dick Modzelewski and Jim Katcavage — now, there's a set of great football names — played together from 1956 through 1962. They opened up gaps for middle linebacker Sam Huff to become the first
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SPORTS OF THE TIMES; Robustelli's Family Came First, And Giants Reaped the Benefits
NYTimes - over 5 years
If the Giants were to create a Mount Rushmore of their most important players, Andy Robustelli's chiseled face would be at its right end, befitting his position on the defensive unit that popularized pro football in the New York metropolitan area half a century ago. But for all of his Hall of Fame tackles on teams that won the 1956 N.F.L.
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NYTimes article
Robustelli's Family Came First, and Giants Reaped the Benefits - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
But those gaps were created by Robustelli in concert mostly with left end Jim Katcavage, left tackle Dick Modzelewski and right tackle Roosevelt Grier, along with other linebackers and defensive backs, notably the Hall of Fame safety Emlen Tunnell
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UPI NewsTrack Sports - UPI.com
Google News - over 5 years
Robustelli joined Roosevelt Grier, Dick Modzelewski and Jim Katcavage on a fearsome defensive line that played together from 1956 to 1962. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971 and returned to the Giants as their general manager from
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Andy Robustelli, Giants' Hall of Fame Defensive End, Dies at 85 - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
But it was the defensive alignment, featuring Robustelli, Roosevelt Grier, Dick Modzelewski and Jim Katcavage on the line, Sam Huff at middle linebacker, and a secondary led by Emlen Tunnell, that captured the fans' imagination
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Dick Lynch, 72, Giants Star Who Became a Broadcaster
NYTimes - over 8 years
Dick Lynch, who twice led the National Football League in interceptions as a defensive back for the New York Giants and who later spent 40 years as a radio broadcaster for the team, died Wednesday at his home in the Douglaston section of Queens. He was 72. The cause was leukemia, his son, John Liam Lynch, said. Lynch was a Giant for eight seasons,
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NYTimes article
Ernie Stautner, 80, Starred As Undersized N.F.L. Tackle
NYTimes - about 11 years
Ernie Stautner, an undersized defensive tackle who became the best player on the Pittsburgh Steelers' woeful teams in the 1950's and was later enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, died yesterday in a nursing home in Carbondale, Colo. He was 80 and lived in Vail, Colo. The cause was Alzheimer's disease, his wife, Jill, said. For 14 National
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Wellington Mara, Patriarch of N.F.L., Dies at 89
NYTimes - over 11 years
Wellington Mara, the patriarch of the National Football League, who served as a ball boy for the leather-helmeted 1925 Giants and later turned the team -- founded by his father -- into one of the marquee names in professional sports, died yesterday at his home in Rye, N.Y. He was 89. The cause was cancer of the lymph nodes, the Giants said. Mr.
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NYTimes article
PRO FOOTBALL; Longevity Has Its Rewards
NYTimes - about 16 years
When Tim Mara, a legal bookmaker, a son of a New York City policeman and a colorful character of Manhattan's halcyon, pre-Depression years, paid $500 to buy the Giants in 1925, he told his 9-year-old son, Wellington: ''In New York, an empty store with two chairs in it is worth that much.'' Sixty-six years later, when the businessman Robert Tisch
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Tom Landry, 75, Dies; Innovative Coach of Cowboys
NYTimes - about 17 years
Tom Landry, the taciturn Texan who coached the Dallas Cowboys for their first 29 seasons and led them to five Super Bowls, died Saturday night in Dallas. He was 75. Landry died at Baylor University Medical Center, where since May he had periodically undergone treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia, a hospital spokeswoman said. Landry was head
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NYTimes article
Tom Landry Is Dead at 75; Innovative Coach of Cowboys
NYTimes - about 17 years
Tom Landry, the taciturn Texan who coached the Dallas Cowboys for their first 29 seasons and led them to five Super Bowls, died last night in Dallas. He was 75. Landry died at Baylor University Medical Center, where since May he had periodically undergone treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia, a hospital spokeswoman said. Landry was head coach
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NYTimes article
Jim Katcavage, 60, Giants Star Of '56 Championship Team, Dies
NYTimes - almost 22 years
Jim Katcavage, the gritty defensive end for the New York Giants who began his career on the famous 1956 championship team and never let up for 13 grueling seasons, died yesterday at his home in Maple Glen, Pa., outside Philadelphia. He was 60. The cause was a heart attack, his family said. He was only a fourth-round draft choice, out of the
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NYTimes article
PRO FOOTBALL; Little Mo Can Remember When Giants Were Giants
NYTimes - about 23 years
On the practice fields of St. Michael's College, then in Winooski, Vt., where the Giants once performed their preseason labors, there was a distant shed used as a marker. Jim Lee Howell, the coach, would order the players to run laps, twice around the shed, at the end of practice. "What Jim Lee didn't know," said Dick Modzelewski, "was that at
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NYTimes article
SPORTS PEOPLE: COLLEGE FOOTBALL; The Newest Hall of Famers
NYTimes - about 24 years
BO SCHEMBECHLER, ALAN PAGE and 11 others are the newest members of the College Football Hall of Fame, in Kings Island, Ohio. The elections, held by the National Football Foundation, were announced yesterday. Schembechler compiled a 234-65-8 record in 27 years of coaching at Miami of Ohio from 1963 to 1968 and at Michigan from 1969 to 1989. Page
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NYTimes article
SPORTS PEOPLE: PRO FOOTBALL; Lions Hire Leachman
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: Lamar Leachman, the Giants' defensive line coach for the past 10 seasons, was hired yesterday as an assistant coach for the Detroit Lions. Leachman, 55 years old, replaces Dick Modzelewski, who has retired, as defensive line coach. Lamar Leachman, the Giants' defensive line coach for the past 10 seasons, was hired yesterday as an assistant
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dick Modzelewski
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1993
    Age 62
    Modzelewski was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993.
    More Details Hide Details Growing up in West Natrona, Pennsylvania as one of six children, Modzelewski was a three-sport athlete at Har-Brack High School (now Highlands High School). Modzelewski joined his brother, Ed, and played college football at the University of Maryland. Just as he was set to begin his sophomore season, Modzelewski moved into the starting lineup after an injury to the Terrapins' Ray Krouse. He would keep that status for the next three years, winning All-American honors as both a junior and senior, while also capturing the 1952 Outland Trophy.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1988
    Age 57
    Modzelewski eventually served as the team's defensive coordinator, but after four frustrating years, Gregg resigned and Modzelewski landed with the Lions in 1988 as the defensive line tutor.
    More Details Hide Details He spent two years in that role until announcing his retirement.
  • 1983
    Age 52
    After a disappointing 1983 season, Gregg left to take over his dream job: head coach of the Green Bay Packers, then brought Modzelewski with him to again serve as defensive line coach.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1979
    Age 48
    After first being dismissed with the entire staff one day after the end of the 1979 season, Modzelewski was rehired by Gregg, who had been selected as the Bengals' new head coach.
    More Details Hide Details The team struggled to a 6-10 season in 1980, but then put together a memorable year in 1981, ending with the franchise's first-ever trip to the Super Bowl. Despite a 26-21 defeat to the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XVI, the Bengals returned to the post-season the following year, but lost in the first round of the expanded playoff system.
    That position would last only one season after another wholesale coaching change, but he would resurface as defensive line coach with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1979 under head coach Homer Rice.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1978
    Age 47
    As 1978 began, new Browns head coach Sam Rutigliano quickly announced he was eliminating the defensive coordinator position, and offered Modzelewski the job of defensive line coach.
    More Details Hide Details Seeing the offer as a demotion, Modzelewski resigned and returned to the New York Giants as their defensive coordinator.
  • 1976
    Age 45
    On February 13, 1976, Modzelewski was promoted to defensive coordinator and the team responded with a six-game improvement.
    More Details Hide Details Midway through the 1977 season, the Browns had a 5-2 record and seemed destined for their first playoff berth in five years. However, a season-ending injury to starting quarterback Brian Sipe led to a tailspin that culminated with Gregg's dismissal on December 13. Modzelewski was named interim head coach for the team's final game, a 20-19 loss to the second-year Seattle Seahawks.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1967
    Age 36
    Modzelewski served as a scout for the Browns in 1967, then joined the team's on-field staff the following year as defensive line coach. After two solid years in which the team again reached the NFL Championship game, the Browns' fortunes declined over the next five years, with a then-team-worst 3-11 record in 1975 forcing head coach Forrest Gregg to make changes.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1965
    Age 34
    In his final two years as a player, the Browns again reached the title game in 1965, but fell short the following year.
    More Details Hide Details During his final campaign, Modzelewski was joined by another brother, Gene, who played one season before fulfilling a military commitment.
  • 1964
    Age 33
    It is noteworthy to add that in their first seasons with the Browns both Dick in 1964 and his brother Ed in 1955 helped Cleveland win the NFL Championship.
    More Details Hide Details
    On March 4, 1964, Modzelewski was traded to the Browns, in exchange for wide receiver Bobby Crespino.
    More Details Hide Details Originally expected to be a supplement to starting defensive tackles Jim Kanicki and Frank Parker, Modzelewski was rushed into the lineup following an injury to Parker in the season opener on September 13. Over the course of the season, Modzelewski's veteran leadership helped lead the Browns to their first Eastern Conference title in seven years. In the NFL Championship game on December 27, he joined an aggressive defense in completely shutting down the Baltimore Colts offense, giving the Browns a 27-0 shutout victory.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1956
    Age 25
    Over the next eight seasons, the Giants would play for the NFL championship six times, but their only victory would come during Modzelewski's first season in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details Among a colorful group of defenders, Modzelewski's low-key approach often saw him remain in the shadow of these players, but his presence helped the team remain a perennial title contender.
    On April 24, 1956, he was traded to the Detroit Lions, then was dealt three days later to the New York Giants.
    More Details Hide Details In an ironic twist, the player the Lions receive was Krouse, whose 1950 injury at Maryland had led to Modzelewski's development.
  • 1955
    Age 24
    With Modzelewski unhappy, the Redskins traded him to the Pittsburgh Steelers on March 1, 1955, once again reuniting him with brother Ed, a fullback on the team.
    More Details Hide Details The brothers would not play together though, as Ed was traded to the Cleveland Browns, as a replacement for retiring Hall of Famer Marion Motley, with whom he won the NFL Championship. Dick was once again traded, this time twice in a four-day span.
  • 1954
    Age 23
    In his two years with the team, Modzelewski showed promise as a rookie, then began having conflicts with Redskins' coach Joe Kuharich in 1954.
    More Details Hide Details As a result, Modzelewski signed with the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League, ready to play for former Maryland assistant coach Jack Hennemier. However, after the Redskins filed an injunction to stop the deal, the Stampeders signed an agreement to tear up the contract.
  • 1953
    Age 22
    The Washington Redskins took notice of Modzelewski's accomplishments and drafted him in the second round of the 1953 NFL Draft, signing him on April 10.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1951
    Age 20
    In a 1951 game against the University of North Carolina, Modzelewski paced a defense with 12 solo tackles, while the team held the Tar Heels to just 40 yards of offense.
    More Details Hide Details At the end of that season, Maryland was ranked third in the country and knocked off the top-ranked University of Tennessee Volunteers in the Sugar Bowl.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1931
    Age 0
    Born on February 16, 1931.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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