Dizzy Gillespie
Jazz trumpeter
Dizzy Gillespie
John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie was an American jazz trumpet player, bandleader, composer and, occasionally, singer. Allmusic's Scott Yanow wrote, "Dizzy Gillespie's contributions to jazz were huge. One of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time, Gillespie was such a complex player that his contemporaries ended up copying Miles Davis and Fats Navarro instead, and it was not until Jon Faddis's emergence in the 1970s that Dizzy's style was successfully recreated . . .
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Dizzy Gillespie's personal information overview.
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Jazzing Up Your Image - Small Business Trends
Google News - over 5 years
Years later I hear about a company “jazzing up its image” and immediately imagined employees as Dizzy Gillespie circa the 1940s. Odd? Sure. Obscure? OK. But immensely fun for me personally. Mark Anderson's cartoons appear in publications including
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Charlotte celebrates its favorite son - South Charlotte Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
“Later in life when he would produce a jazz-themed collage that would include Dizzy Gillespie or Thelonius Monk, they were real to him as they often sat at the Bearden family dinner table.” Music also played an integral part of the artist's life
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Jazz notes: Junior Mance, Bucky Pizzarelli, Jon Faddis - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
He anchored the groups of Lester Young and Dizzy Gillespie in the 1950s, and was singer Sarah Vaughan's accompanist of choice for many years. At 83, Mance remains spry and soulful at the keyboard, and plays in a bluesy style reminiscent of one of his
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Terence Blanchard and Poncho Sanchez's Chano y Dizzy! CD Set for September 27 ... - TheaterMania.com
Google News - over 5 years
Trumpeter and composer Terence Blanchard and conguero Poncho Sanchez's new CD Chano y Dizzy! will pay tribute to two legends of Latin jazz - conga drummer and composer Chano Pozo and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. The album will be released by Concord Jazz
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New U.S. poet laureate a blue-collar Detroiter - Windsor Star
Google News - over 5 years
... and he never forgot what it was like slugging away at the River Rouge Ford plant, or stopping in at the dance halls along Woodward in the 1940s and slipping into the Paradise to hear the great jazzmen, like Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker
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Today in Music History - July 12 - mysask.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Carter performed with or wrote music for nearly all of jazz's early greats, including Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Duke Ellington and Dizzy Gillespie. He received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987. In 2008, "Bon Jovi" performed a free
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Songs for Swinging Babies - Brooklyn Rail
Google News - over 5 years
She may or may not like the Dizzy Gillespie Big Band, but I could sing “Oo Bop Sh'Bam” to her all day. Same thing with “Hey Pete, Let's Eat More Meat.” The meat is tasty, but it's the bebop scat singing that gives her the giggly-grins
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Expect explosive performance when dance band takes the stage at High Falls Cafe - Poughkeepsie Journal
Google News - over 5 years
The spirit of Thelonious Monk, who, according to www.concordmusicgroup.com, jammed with Dizzy Gillespie and played a critical role in the evolution of bebop, will hang heavy in the air during a performance by the band Phelonious Phunk
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Big hair and good music at the North Sea Jazz Festival in Rotterdam - msnbc.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Legends of jazz like Sarah Vaughan, Count Basie and Dizzy Gillespie performed that first year. The festival moved to its current, bigger location in Rotterdam in 2006. More than 1000 musicians are expected to play on 13 different stages this year,
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Bobby Sanabria and Ascension bring Latin jazz to SoundSession 2011 July 9 in ... - Providence Journal
Google News - over 5 years
He's played with such legends as Dizzy Gillespie, Mongo Santamaria, Paquio D'Rivera, Arturo Sandoval and more in a career that's lasted nearly 40 years, and if his own career is a testament to the depth of the music, the makeup of his group, Ascension,
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Insight Cuba Announces HAVANA JAZZ EXPERIENCE - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
Among the passengers were Earl Hines, David Amram, Stan Getz and Dizzy Gillespie. "When we got off the ship, we could see a large crowd waiting at the dock and people were chanting 'Dizzy, Dizzy, Dizzy...'", recalls Sabin. "It was wild
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World Music Pioneer Plays San Francisco - KTVU San Francisco
Google News - over 5 years
Emigrating to the US to escape from the oppressive grip apartheid had on his homeland, the horn player became a powerful force on the American jazz scene, counting Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and other giants of the music among his close friends
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Jazz Great Monty Alexander For West Coast Performance - CaribPR.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
I also look forward to reflecting musically on adventures I had through the years with, among others, Frank Sinatra, Dizzy Gillespie, Milt Jackson, Quincy Jones, Ray Brown and other legends of Jazz.” From California, Alexander, whose album has been
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Chano Pozo meets Dizzy Gillespie - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
It was in Chano Pozo's Harlem apartment in September 1947 that Dizzy Gillespie met Cuba's greatest percussionist, newly arrived from Havana. By the end of the month, Pozo was adding his conga drum to Gillespie's incendiary big band at a Carnegie Hall
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dizzy Gillespie
    TWENTIES
  • 1993
    A longtime resident of Englewood, New Jersey he died of pancreatic cancer January 6, 1993, aged 75, and was buried in the Flushing Cemetery, Queens, New York City.
    More Details Hide Details Mike Longo delivered a eulogy at his funeral. He was also with Gillespie on the night he died, along with Jon Faddis and a select few others. At the time of his death, Gillespie was survived by his widow, Lorraine Willis Gillespie (d. 2004); a daughter, jazz singer Jeanie Bryson; and a grandson, Radji Birks Bryson-Barrett. Gillespie had two funerals. One was a Bahá'í funeral at his request, at which his closest friends and colleagues attended. The second was at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York City open to the public. As a tribute to him, DJ Qualls' character in the 2002 American teen comedy film The New Guy was named Dizzy Gillespie Harrison. The Marvel Comics current Hawkeye comic written by Matt Fraction features Gillespie's music in a section of the editorials called the "Hawkguy Playlist".
    In 1993 he received the Polar Music Prize in Sweden.
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  • 1992
    November 26, 1992 at Carnegie Hall in New York City, following the Second Bahá'í World Congress was Gillespie's 75th birthday concert and his offering to the celebration of the centenary of the passing of Bahá'u'lláh.
    More Details Hide Details Gillespie was to appear at Carnegie Hall for the 33rd time. The line-up included: Jon Faddis, Marvin "Doc" Holladay, James Moody, Paquito D'Rivera, and the Mike Longo Trio with Ben Brown on bass and Mickey Roker on drums. But Gillespie didn't make it because he was in bed suffering from cancer of the pancreas. "But the musicians played their real hearts out for him, no doubt suspecting that he would not play again. Each musician gave tribute to their friend, this great soul and innovator in the world of jazz." In 2002, Gillespie was posthumously inducted into the International Latin Music Hall of Fame for his contributions to Afro-Cuban music. Gillespie also starred in a film called The Winter in Lisbon released in 2004. He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7057 Hollywood Boulevard in the Hollywood section of the City of Los Angeles. He is honored by the December 31, 2006 – A Jazz New Year's Eve: Freddy Cole & the Dizzy Gillespie All-Star Big Band at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1989
    In 1989 Gillespie gave 300 performances in 27 countries, appeared in 100 U.S. cities in 31 states and the District of Columbia, headlined three television specials, performed with two symphonies, and recorded four albums.
    More Details Hide Details He was also crowned a traditional chief in Nigeria, received the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres; France's most prestigious cultural award. He was named Regent Professor by the University of California, and received his fourteenth honorary doctoral degree, this one from the Berklee College of Music. In addition, he was awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award the same year. The next year, at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts ceremonies celebrating the centennial of American jazz, Gillespie received the Kennedy Center Honors Award and the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers Duke Ellington Award for 50 years of achievement as a composer, performer, and bandleader.
  • 1988
    In 1988, Gillespie had worked with Canadian flautist and saxophonist Moe Koffman on their prestigious album Oo Pop a Da.
    More Details Hide Details He did fast scat vocals on the title track and a couple of the other tracks were played only on trumpet.
  • 1982
    In 1982, Gillespie had a cameo appearance on Stevie Wonder's hit "Do I Do".
    More Details Hide Details Gillespie's tone gradually faded in the last years in life, and his performances often focused more on his proteges such as Arturo Sandoval and Jon Faddis; his good-humoured comedic routines became more and more a part of his live act.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1979
    Gillespie published his autobiography, To Be or Not to Bop, in 1979.
    More Details Hide Details Gillespie was a vocal fixture in many of John Hubley and Faith Hubley's animated films, such as The Hole, The Hat, and Voyage to Next. In the 1980s, Gillespie led the United Nation Orchestra. For three years Flora Purim toured with the Orchestra and she credits Gillespie with evolving her understanding of jazz after being in the field for over two decades. David Sánchez also toured with the group and was also greatly influenced by Gillespie. Both artists later were nominated for Grammy awards. Gillespie also had a guest appearance on The Cosby Show as well as Sesame Street and The Muppet Show.
  • OTHER
  • 1960
    In 1960, he was inducted into the Down Beat magazine's Jazz Hall of Fame. During the 1964 United States presidential campaign the artist, with tongue in cheek, put himself forward as an independent write-in candidate.
    More Details Hide Details He promised that if he were elected, the White House would be renamed the Blues House, and he would have a cabinet composed of Duke Ellington (Secretary of State), Miles Davis (Director of the CIA), Max Roach (Secretary of Defense), Charles Mingus (Secretary of Peace), Ray Charles (Librarian of Congress), Louis Armstrong (Secretary of Agriculture), Mary Lou Williams (Ambassador to the Vatican), Thelonious Monk (Travelling Ambassador) and Malcolm X (Attorney General). He said his running mate would be Phyllis Diller. Campaign buttons had been manufactured years before by Gillespie's booking agency "for publicity, as a gag", but now proceeds from them went to benefit the Congress of Racial Equality, Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King, Jr.; in later years they became a collector's item. In 1971 Gillespie announced he would run again but withdrew before the election for reasons connected to the Bahá'í Faith.
  • 1956
    In 1956 Gillespie organized a band to go on a State Department tour of the Middle East which was extremely well received internationally and earned him the nickname "the Ambassador of Jazz".
    More Details Hide Details During this time, he also continued to lead a big band that performed throughout the United States and featured musicians including Pee Wee Moore and others. This band recorded a live album at the 1957 Newport jazz festival that featured Mary Lou Williams as a guest artist on piano. In the late 1940s, Gillespie was also involved in the movement called Afro-Cuban music, bringing Afro-Latin American music and elements to greater prominence in jazz and even pop music, particularly salsa. Afro-Cuban jazz is based on traditional Afro-Cuban rhythms. Gillespie was introduced to Chano Pozo in 1947 by Mario Bauza, a Latin jazz trumpet player. Chano Pozo became Gillespie's conga drummer for his band. Gillespie also worked with Mario Bauza in New York jazz clubs on 52nd Street and several famous dance clubs such as Palladium and the Apollo Theater in Harlem. They played together in the Chick Webb band and Cab Calloway's band, where Gillespie and Bauza became lifelong friends. Gillespie helped develop and mature the Afro-Cuban jazz style.
  • 1953
    On January 6, 1953 Gillespie threw a party for his wife Lorraine at Snookie's in Manhattan, where his trumpet's bell got bent upward in an accident, but he liked the sound so much he had a special trumpet made with a 45 degree raised bell, becoming his trademark.
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  • 1948
    In 1948 Gillespie was involved in a traffic accident when the bicycle he was riding was bumped by an automobile.
    More Details Hide Details He was slightly injured, and found that he could no longer hit the B-flat above high C. He won the case, but the jury awarded him only $1000, in view of his high earnings up to that point.
  • 1946
    He also headlined the 1946 independently produced musical revue film Jivin' in Be-Bop.
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  • 1945
    Unlike Parker, who was content to play in small groups and be an occasional featured soloist in big bands, Gillespie aimed to lead a big band himself; his first, unsuccessful, attempt to do this was in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details After his work with Parker, Gillespie led other small combos (including ones with Milt Jackson, John Coltrane, Lalo Schifrin, Ray Brown, Kenny Clarke, James Moody, J.J. Johnson, and Yusef Lateef) and finally put together his first successful big band. Gillespie and his band tried to popularize bop and make Gillespie a symbol of the new music. He also appeared frequently as a soloist with Norman Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic.
    Then, Gillespie joined the big band of Hines' long-time collaborator Billy Eckstine, and it was as a member of Eckstine's band that he was reunited with Charlie Parker, a fellow member. In 1945, Gillespie left Eckstine's band because he wanted to play with a small combo.
    More Details Hide Details A "small combo" typically comprised no more than five musicians, playing the trumpet, saxophone, piano, bass and drums. Bebop was known as the first modern jazz style. However, it was unpopular in the beginning and was not viewed as positively as swing music was. Bebop was seen as an outgrowth of swing, not a revolution. Swing introduced a diversity of new musicians in the bebop era like Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell, Kenny Clarke, Oscar Pettiford, and Gillespie. Through these musicians, a new vocabulary of musical phrases was created. With Parker, Gillespie jammed at famous jazz clubs like Minton's Playhouse and Monroe's Uptown House. Parker's system also held methods of adding chords to existing chord progressions and implying additional chords within the improvised lines. Gillespie compositions like "Groovin' High", "Woody 'n' You" and "Salt Peanuts" sounded radically different, harmonically and rhythmically, from the swing music popular at the time. "A Night in Tunisia", written in 1942, while Gillespie was playing with Earl Hines' band, is noted for having a feature that is common in today's music, a non-walking bass line. The song also displays Afro-Cuban rhythms. One of their first small-group performances together was only issued in 2005: a concert in New York's Town Hall on June 22, 1945. Gillespie taught many of the young musicians on 52nd Street, including Miles Davis and Max Roach, about the new style of jazz.
  • 1943
    In 1943, Gillespie joined the Earl Hines band.
    More Details Hide Details Composer Gunther Schuller said:... In 1943 I heard the great Earl Hines band which had Bird in it and all those other great musicians. They were playing all the flatted fifth chords and all the modern harmonies and substitutions and Gillespie runs in the trumpet section work. Two years later I read that that was 'bop' and the beginning of modern jazz... but the band never made recordings. Gillespie said of the Hines band, "People talk about the Hines band being 'the incubator of bop' and the leading exponents of that music ended up in the Hines band. But people also have the erroneous impression that the music was new. It was not. The music evolved from what went before. It was the same basic music. The difference was in how you got from here to here to here... naturally each age has got its own shit".
  • 1942
    During his time in Calloway's band, Gillespie started writing big band music for bandleaders like Woody Herman and Jimmy Dorsey. He then freelanced with a few bands – most notably Ella Fitzgerald's orchestra, composed of members of the late Chick Webb's band, in 1942.
    More Details Hide Details Gillespie avoided serving in World War II. In his Selective Service interview, he told the local board, "in this stage of my life here in the United States whose foot has been in my ass?" He was thereafter classed as 4-F.
  • 1941
    After a notorious altercation between the two men, Calloway fired Gillespie in late 1941.
    More Details Hide Details The incident is recounted by Gillespie, along with fellow Calloway band members Milt Hinton and Jonah Jones, in Jean Bach's 1997 film, The Spitball Story. Calloway did not approve of Gillespie's mischievous humor, nor of his adventuresome approach to soloing; according to Jones, Calloway referred to it as "Chinese music". Finally, their grudge for each other erupted over a thrown spitball. Calloway never thought highly of Dizzy, because he didn't view Dizzy as a good musician. Once during a rehearsal, a member of the band threw a spitball. Already in a foul mood, Calloway decided to blame this on Dizzy. In order to clear his name, Dizzy didn’t take the blame and the problem quickly escalated into a fist fight, then a knife fight. Calloway had minor cuts on the thigh and wrist. After the two men were separated, Calloway fired Dizzy. A few days later, Dizzy tried to apologize to Calloway, but he was dismissed.
  • 1939
    Gillespie stayed with Teddy Hill's band for a year, then left and free-lanced with numerous other bands. In 1939, Gillespie joined Cab Calloway's orchestra, with which he recorded one of his earliest compositions, the instrumental "Pickin' the Cabbage", in 1940. (Originally released on Paradiddle, a 78rpm backed with a co-composition with Cozy Cole, Calloway's drummer at the time, on the Vocalion label, No. 5467).
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  • 1937
    In August 1937 while gigging with Hayes in Washington D.C., Gillespie met a young dancer named Lorraine Willis who worked a Baltimore–Philadelphia–New York City circuit which included the Apollo Theater. Willis was not immediately friendly but Gillespie was attracted anyway. The two finally married on May 9, 1940.
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  • 1935
    Gillespie's first professional job was with the Frank Fairfax Orchestra in 1935, after which he joined the respective orchestras of Edgar Hayes and Teddy Hill, essentially replacing Roy Eldridge as first trumpet in 1937.
    More Details Hide Details Teddy Hill's band was where Gillespie made his first recording, "King Porter Stomp".
  • 1917
    Born on October 21, 1917.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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