Dolores Costello
Actress
Dolores Costello
Dolores Costello was an American film actress who achieved her greatest success during the era of silent movies. She was nicknamed "The Goddess of the Silent Screen". She was stepmother of John Barrymore's daughter Diana, by his second wife Blanche Oelrichs, the mother of John Drew Barrymore and Dolores (Dee Dee) Barrymore, and the grandmother of John Barrymore III, Blyth Dolores Barrymore, Brahma Blyth (Jessica) Barrymore, and Drew Barrymore.
Biography
Dolores Costello's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Dolores Costello
News
News abour Dolores Costello from around the web
TNR Film Classic: 'The Magnificent Ambersons' (1942) - New Republic
Google News - over 5 years
Front and center of the Ambersons is the Oedipean situation between Dolores Costello and son Tim Holt, which, according to the movie, started when Dolores married the wrong man. All her frustrated love went toward smothering her son, and sure enough he
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Google News article
Costello loses battle with lung cancer - TheChronicleHerald.ca
Google News - over 5 years
The cause was lung cancer, said his mother, Dolores Costello. Costello, a strong puncher, captured his World Boxing Council championship with a 10th-round technical knockout of Bruce Curry in January 1984, and he successfully defended his title in the
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Google News article
Billy Costello, 55, Who Won Light Welterweight Crown
NYTimes - over 5 years
Billy Costello, who overcame a troubled youth to become an undefeated light welterweight champion in the mid-1980s despite not putting on boxing gloves until he was 19, died Wednesday in Kingston, N.Y. He was 55. The cause was lung cancer, said his mother, Dolores Costello. Costello, a strong puncher, captured his World Boxing Council championship
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NYTimes article
Drew Barrymore: vesoljček ji je spremenil življenje - SiOL.net
Google News - over 5 years
Z igralskim poklicem sta se ukvarjala tudi dedek John Barrymore in babica Dolores Costello, za njima še oče John Drew Barrymore mlajši in mama Ildiko Jaid Barrymore. Še preden je dopolnila eno leto, je nastopila v TV-oglasu za pasjo hrano,
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Google News article
John Drew Barrymore, 72, of Acting Clan
NYTimes - about 12 years
John Drew Barrymore, the sometimes troubled heir to an acting dynasty and the father of the movie star Drew Barrymore, died on Monday in Los Angeles. He was 72. His family announced the death in a statement issued by the office of Chris Miller, publicist for Drew Barrymore and her production company, Flower Films. Mr. Barrymore was part of a family
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NYTimes article
Elaine Barrie, 87, Dies; Married Barrymore
NYTimes - almost 14 years
Elaine Barrie, the fourth wife of the Shakespearean actor John Barrymore, with whom she shared a tumultuous on-again, off-again engagement and marriage that enthralled the nation in the darkest days of the Depression, died on Saturday in Manhattan. She was 87. Her story unwinds like an old-fashioned movie. As a Hunter College student of 19, she
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NYTimes article
TELEVISION REVIEW; When a Dignified Family Is Shouting and Screaming
NYTimes - about 15 years
''The Magnificent Ambersons,'' Booth Tarkington's Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, must be a victim of a curse. First, in 1942, Orson Welles made it into a masterpiece of a film, went off to Brazil to work on another project and returned to find that RKO had chopped out more than 40 minutes of what had been a two-hour-plus work, cleverly deleting
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NYTimes article
Magnificent Wellesian Flop to Be Remade as Mini-Series
NYTimes - over 16 years
When Orson Welles completed ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' in 1942, he considered the film superior to his previous movie and masterpiece, ''Citizen Kane.'' But a disastrous preview screening before a teenage audience led RKO Studios to take ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' out of Welles's hands and delete more than 40 minutes of the saga of a wealthy
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NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 18 years
In Rene Clair's FLAME OF NEW ORLEANS (1941), Marlene Dietrich has a rowdy, sophisticated time choosing between two swains: Bruce Cabot and Roland Young. The funniest scenes are a sly pantomime, with Marlene warbling ''Sweet is the Blush of May,'' and a hilarious, pre-nuptial encounter with Laura Hope Crews -- Monday at 8 A.M. on American Movie
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NYTimes article
Home Video
NYTimes - almost 23 years
More From PBS The scant supply of PBS videos in stores is scheduled for an infusion in the fall. This week, PBS announced an agreement with Turner Home Entertainment to distribute some PBS programs on cassette. The first will be "Baseball," a new 19-hour historical biography of the game by the producer and director Ken Burns. PBS plans to broadcast
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NYTimes article
DREW BARRYMORE; One More Page In the Album
NYTimes - almost 24 years
To the Editor: In a lengthy interview [ "The Name Is Barrymore, but the Style Is All Drew," March 7 ] , Drew Barrymore mentions all her acting relatives but one: her grandmother Dolores Costello (John Barrymore's third wife). Costello was a fine actress and one of the great beauties of movie history. Anyone doubting that should catch her last
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NYTimes article
Home Video
NYTimes - about 24 years
Releases on Wednesdays This month the studios will do the same with videocassettes as they do with movies. Tapes of many feature films will be released only one day a week. In theaters, films usually open on Friday; in video stores the day will be Wednesday. "A majority of studios have agreed to test the concept," said Jim Ulsamer, a vice president
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NYTimes article
CRITICS' CHOICES; Cable TV
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: Three fine films on cable this week are interesting examples of novels lifted from the page to celluloid. In its television debut, E. M. Forster's ''Room With a View'' (1986) arrives on Sunday at 8 P.M. on Showtime, repeating on Thursday at 11:30 P.M. The rarely shown thriller made from John Le Carre's ''Spy Who Came in From the Cold'' (1966)
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NYTimes article
A RETROSPECTIVE OF WELLES FILMS AT THE REGENCY
NYTimes - almost 31 years
''Citizen Kane'' and ''The Magnificent Ambersons,'' two masterpieces of American film, form a double bill that opens an important Orson Welles retrospective Sunday at the Regency Theater. The series, believed to be the most complete showing of Welles's work since his death at the age of 70 last October, includes 24 films and will run through June
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dolores Costello
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1979
    Age 75
    She died from emphysema in Fallbrook, California, in 1979, and was interred in Calvary Cemetery, East Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details Dolores Costello has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contributions to Motion Pictures, at 1645 Vine Street. Dolores Costello appeared as a child actress in many films made between 1909 and 1915. Among them are: She restarted her motion picture career in 1923 after spending several years modeling in New York.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1939
    Age 35
    In 1939, she married Dr. John Vruwink, an obstetrician who was her physician during her pregnancies, but they divorced in 1950.
    More Details Hide Details Costello spent the remaining years of her life in semi-seclusion, managing an avocado farm. Her film career was largely ruined by the destructive effects of early film makeup, which ravaged her complexion too severely to camouflage. Her final film was This Is the Army (1943). In the 1970s her house was inundated in a flash flood which destroyed a lot of her property and memorabilia from her movie career and life with John Barrymore. Shortly before her death, she was interviewed for the documentary series Hollywood (1980) discussing her film career.
  • 1935
    Age 31
    She would have another child (John Drew Barrymore), but the marriage proved too difficult due to her husband's increasing alcoholism, and they divorced in 1935.
    More Details Hide Details She resumed her career a year later and achieved some successes, most notably in Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936), and The Magnificent Ambersons (1942). She retired permanently from acting following her appearance in This is the Army (1943), again under the direction of Michael Curtiz. Making a rare radio appearance, Costello appeared as the Danish Countess Elsa on the radio program Suspense with an air date of August 28, 1943. The title of the episode is The King's Birthday written by Corporal Leonard Pellitier US Army.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1931
    Age 27
    Her acting career became less a priority for her following the birth of her first child, Dolores Ethel Mae "DeeDee" Barrymore (born April 8, 1930) and she retired from the screen in 1931 to devote time to her family.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1928
    Age 24
    In 1928, she co-starred with George O'Brien in Noah's Ark, a part-talkie epic directed by Michael Curtiz.
    More Details Hide Details Costello spoke with a lisp (something that her granddaughter, Drew Barrymore, seemingly inherited), and found it difficult to make the transition to talking pictures, but after two years of voice coaching she was comfortable speaking before a microphone. One of her early sound film appearances was with her sister Helene in Warner Bros. 's all-star extravaganza, The Show of Shows (1929).
    Meanwhile, she and Barrymore became romantically involved and married in 1928.
    More Details Hide Details Within a few years of achieving stardom, the delicately beautiful blonde-haired actress had become a successful and highly regarded film personality in her own right, and as a young adult her career developed to the degree that in 1926, she was named a WAMPAS Baby Star, and had acquired the nickname "The Goddess of the Silver Screen".
  • 1927
    Age 23
    Warners alternated Costello between films with contemporary settings and elaborate costume dramas. In 1927, she was re-teamed with John Barrymore in When a Man Loves, an adaptation of Manon Lescaut.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1926
    Age 22
    The two sisters appeared on Broadway together as chorines and their success resulted in contracts with Warner Brothers Studios. In 1926, following small parts in feature films, she was selected by John Barrymore to star opposite him in The Sea Beast, a loose adaptation of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick.
    More Details Hide Details Warner Bros. soon began starring her in her own vehicles.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1909
    Age 5
    Dolores Costello's earliest listed credit on the IMDb is in the role of a fairy in a 1909 adaptation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.
    More Details Hide Details
    Dolores Costello was born in Pittsburgh, the daughter of actors Maurice Costello and Mae Costello (née Mae Altschuk). She was of Irish and German descent. She and her younger sister, Helene, made their first film appearances in the years 1909–1915 as child actresses for the Vitagraph Film Company.
    More Details Hide Details They played supporting roles in several films starring their father, who was a popular matinee idol at the time.
  • 1903
    Born
    Born on September 17, 1903.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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