Don Hoak
American baseball player and coach
Don Hoak
Donald Albert Hoak was a Major League Baseball player. Nicknamed "Tiger," Hoak was a third baseman who played ten seasons in the Majors with the Brooklyn Dodgers (1954–55), Chicago Cubs (1956), Cincinnati Reds (1957–58), Pittsburgh Pirates (1959–62) and Philadelphia Phillies (1963–64). He played 1263 games and compiled a .265 batting average with 89 home runs and 498 runs batted in.
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Don Hoak's personal information overview.
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News
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2011 MLB All-Star Game: 5 Reasons Voting Needs to Be Take Away from Fans - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
The worst case of ballot stuffing occurred in 1957, when seven members of the Cincinnati Reds were voted starters in the All-Star Game: Johnny Temple (2B), Roy McMillan (SS), Don Hoak (3B), Ed Bailey (C), Frank Robinson (LF), Gus Bell (CF),
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Google News article
CSNBaltimore.com/PressBoxOnline.com - CSNBaltimore.com
Google News - over 5 years
The seven other starters were Frank Robinson, Wally Post, Ed Bailey, Roy McMillan, Gus Bell, Don Hoak and Johnny Temple. Commissioner Ford Frick was so irate at this ballot-stuffing effort, which was pushed by a local Cincinnati newspaper,
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Google News article
All-Star ballots filled with Reds - Windsor Star
Google News - over 5 years
Half the ballots came from Cincinnati, and except for the Cardinals' Stan Musial, every single starter was a Red: Ed Bailey, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Frank Robinson, Gus Bell and Wally Post. Commissioner Ford Frick replaced Bell and Post
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Google News article
Advice to the Bruins: Watch out for Maz! - Comcast SportsNet New England
Google News - over 5 years
The Pirates had some guys you may never have heard of: Gino Cimoli, Smokey Burgess, Don Hoak, and Vinegar Bend Mizell, just to name a colorful few. As the Bruins and Canucks enter tonight's Game 7 in Vancouver, the Bruins have won Games 3, 4, and 6,
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Milwaukee Braves' memory lives on in exhibit at Miller Park - OnMilwaukee.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Don Hoak's fielding error allowed Felix Mantilla to reach. Hank Aaron was intentionally walked, leaving two on for Adcock who belted what appeared to be a game-winning, three-run homer. Aaron, however, thought the game ended when Mantilla crossed home
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Ten reasons Willie Mays is greatest ever - ESPN (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
1960: Finished third behind Dick Groat and Don Hoak of the first-place Pirates. They were close to Mays in value. I mean, when added together. 1962: Maury Wills edged Mays in the voting, a stunning result in retrospect. Wills scored 130 runs (the same
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A-L's Lemire back in goal for Jr Sabres - Olean Times Herald
Google News - almost 6 years
THAT FORMER major leaguer from Roulette was Don Hoak, the hard-drinking, tough-as-nails former Marine who played third base for the Dodgers, Cubs, Reds, Pirates and Phillies over 11 seasons (1954-64). The story came from old friend Dick Kallenborn,
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The Non-Shutout No-Hitter - FanGraphs (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
Clay Dalrymple sacrificed Demeter to third, and a sac fly from Don Hoak brought him in. Johnson's game is the noteworthiest of the bunch, because his Colt .45s actually lost the game! Johnson allowed an unearned run on two walks, striking out nine en
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Joe L. Brown, 91; Built Championship Teams for Pirates
NYTimes - over 6 years
Joe L. Brown, the Pittsburgh Pirates general manager who built two World Series championship teams and five National League division winners in the 1960s and '70s, died Sunday in Albuquerque. He was 91. His death was announced by the Pirates. When Mr. Brown became the Pirates' general manager after the 1955 season, he succeeded Branch Rickey, who
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NYTimes article
A Ticker-Tape Episode
NYTimes - over 7 years
The ticker tape in the bell jar began to click. It was May 26, 1959, my first night at The New York Times. I was a $38-a-week copy boy. I knew that Western Union ticker was important -- it was the sports department's lifeline to baseball games that were increasingly being played at night. Why, they were even playing on the West Coast now. The
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NYTimes article
BACKTALK; The First, the Only, The Stuffed Ballot Boxes
NYTimes - over 16 years
The 71st Major League Baseball All-Star Game will be played Tuesday night at Turner Field in Atlanta. Through the years, the All-Star Game has been the vehicle for some of baseball's legendary accomplishments. Here is a highly eclectic lineup card of stellar highlights. All-Star Fever The first All-Star Game was staged in 1933, at Comiskey Park, in
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NYTimes article
Out of the Ball Park; For Black Americans, Baseball Loses Its Luster
NYTimes - over 17 years
Standing across the Harlem River from Yankee Stadium, atop some of baseball's most hallowed ground, Michael Franklin, 13, leaned against a black metal fence, largely unmoved by what others were calling the magic of October baseball. He lives in Polo Grounds Towers, a housing project built on the remains of the legendary home of the New York Giants,
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NYTimes article
Gabe Paul, Ex-Yankee Official, Dies at 88
NYTimes - almost 19 years
Gabe Paul, the baseball executive who arranged for George Steinbrenner to buy the Yankees, then built their championship teams of the late 1970's, died on Sunday at Memorial Hospital of Tampa (Fla.). Mr. Paul, who lived in Tampa, was 88. He started out as a minor league batboy in 1920, he was still going strong as president of the Cleveland Indians
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NYTimes article
BACKTALK;It Was 40 Years Ago When Next Year Arrived in Brooklyn
NYTimes - over 21 years
All afternoon Johnny Podres had not shaken off Roy Campanella's sign. But now, with a 2-0 lead, nobody on and two out in the ninth inning at Yankee Stadium, the 23-year-old left-hander saw his catcher's right forefinger again pointing at the dirt behind home plate. "I'd thrown Elston Howard all fastballs because I'd wanted to finish him off with a
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NYTimes article
Harvey Haddix, 68; Known for Pitching 12 Perfect Innings
NYTimes - about 23 years
Harvey Haddix, remembered for pitching 12 innings of perfect baseball in a game he eventually lost, died Saturday at Community Hospital. He was 68. The cause of death was emphysema, the hospital said. Haddix, who had a career record of 136-113 while pitching for the Cardinals, Phillies, Reds, Pirates and Orioles from 1952-65, retired the first 36
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NYTimes article
Harvey Haddix, 68; Known for Pitching 12 Perfect Innings
NYTimes - about 23 years
Harvey Haddix, remembered for pitching 12 innings of perfect baseball in a game he eventually lost, died today at Community Hospital. He was 68. The cause of death was emphysema, the hospital said. Haddix, who had a career record of 136-113 while pitching for the Cardinals, Phillies, Reds, Pirates and Orioles from 1952-65, retired the first 36
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NYTimes article
SIDELINES: YES, THAT RINGS A BELL; 12 Perfect Innings and 32 Years to Remember
NYTimes - over 25 years
Every May 26, the phone rings in HARVEY HADDIX's home in Springfield, Ohio. The former big-leaguer good-naturedly relives what was at once the most extended bit of perfect hurling, and a most imperfect loss. Go back to May 26, 1959, and Haddix, the left-hander for the Pirates, has pitched 12 perfect innings against the Braves in Milwaukee. Then in
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No Headline
NYTimes - almost 33 years
IF the bronze plaques honoring those Dodgers in the Baseball Hall of Fame could talk, several would be saying, ''The captain is finally here.'' Better late than never. Pee Wee Reese was the captain as well as the shortstop of the Dodgers in Brooklyn on those ''Boys of Summer'' teams. During his 16 seasons, he played with 7 Dodgers previously
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NYTimes article
A 1950'S SALUTE IN A 19TH-CENTURY SETTING
NYTimes - over 33 years
TARRYTOWN'S venerable Music Hall, an officially declared 19thcentury landmark where chamber-music concerts and classical plays usually take place, will shake, rattle and roll from Thursday evening through Sunday afternoon. That's when the newly formed Theater League of Westchester will present four performances of ''How Sweet It Was - A Salute to
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NYTimes article
Sports of The Times; Gabe Paul, Baseball's Old Trader
NYTimes - almost 35 years
WHEN he acquired the father in a trade, the son was an infant in a blanket. And a generation later he traded the son. He's now making deals with somebody whose birth once interrupted his bridge game. In the era of the free agent, 72-year-old Gabe Paul of the Cleveland Indians is a throwback to a time when baseball executives had to make trades to
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Don Hoak
    FORTIES
  • 1969
    Age 41
    Hoak then moved up to the Pirates' Triple A club, the Columbus Jets of the International League, whom he managed to a 74-66 record in 1969.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1968
    Age 40
    In 1968, he managed the Salem Redbirds of the Carolina League to an 85-55 record.
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  • 1965
    Age 37
    After retiring from playing, Hoak worked as a Pirates' broadcaster in 1965 and 1966, a coach for the Phillies in 1967, and a manager in the Pirates' farm system from 1968 until 1969.
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  • 1963
    Age 35
    He batted .231 during the 1963 season, then was released in May 1964 after making only six plate appearances—all in pinch-hitting roles.
    More Details Hide Details He retired forthwith, but returned to the Phillies as a scout for the final month of the season—during which the Phillies lost the pennant to the St. Louis Cardinals by one game after leading the National League by 6 1/2 games with two weeks remaining. Don Hoak also played in the Dominican Republic during the 1956 season with the Escogido team. His game always rapid and daring and full of risks. In those days the radio announcer called him "el loquito Hoak" (crazy Hoak) for his risky plays which contributed to his team winning several games and the season. In a final series a game was won when he stole home after making the pitcher nervous several times moving between third and home.
  • 1961
    Age 33
    Hoak batted a career-high .298 during the 1961 season, but slumped to .241 in 1962.
    More Details Hide Details After the 1962 season, the Pirates traded him to the Philadelphia Phillies for Pancho Herrera and Ted Savage.
  • 1960
    Age 32
    Hoak was married to singer/actress Jill Corey, whom he first met at Forbes Field during the Pirates' 1960 season. Hoak pursued Corey for a year afterward, even convincing her to break up with her boyfriend, a Brazilian diplomat. The two wed on December 27, 1961; the marriage bore a daughter, Clare.
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    Instead, the team announced on October 9 that Danny Murtaugh, who managed the Pirates' 1960 World Championship team, was to return for what would be his third of four stints with the club. (Murtaugh had resigned after the 1967 season for medical reasons, and accepted a position in the Pirates' front office.
    More Details Hide Details He asked to reclaim the managerial position after the 1969 season, and was re-hired after receiving medical clearance.) Hoak never received word of this hiring from the Pirates officials; his wife delivered the news to him. Shortly thereafter, Hoak witnessed his brother-in-law's car being stolen from the driveway of the Hoak house. Hoak got into his own car and gave chase. He suffered a heart attack during the pursuit, but managed to stop his vehicle just before collapsing. A doctor who had been driving behind Hoak at the time got out of his own car and performed cardiac massage before an ambulance transported Hoak to the hospital. However, despite efforts to save his life, Hoak died 10 minutes after arrival. His widow would claim for decades that Hoak died of a broken heart because the Pirates had passed him over.
    In 1960, Hoak batted .282 on a Pirates team that won the World Series; like the 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers, Pittsburgh defeated the Yankees in seven games, and the Pirates won the 1960 Series on Bill Mazeroski's ninth-inning home run in Game Seven.
    More Details Hide Details During the Pirates’ championship season, Hoak finished second in National League MVP honors to teammate Dick Groat.
  • 1959
    Age 31
    It was Hoak's throwing error that cost Haddix his perfect game against the Braves after retiring 36 batters in a row on May 26, 1959.
    More Details Hide Details The Braves went on to win that game, 1-0.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1958
    Age 30
    Hoak batted .261 for the Reds during the 1958 season before being traded, along with Harvey Haddix and Smoky Burgess, to the Pittsburgh Pirates for four players (one of whom was Frank Thomas) in January 1959.
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  • 1957
    Age 29
    1957 also marked Hoak's only All-Star appearance, but it also would be mired in controversy—though not of Hoak's doing.
    More Details Hide Details At the time (as they do now) fans had the right to vote for the starters (minus the starting pitchers). As a result, a ballot stuffing campaign by Reds fans resulted in Hoak, Post, Temple, Bell, Ed Bailey, Roy McMillan, and Frank Robinson being voted into the starting lineup. First baseman George Crowe, then 36 and the eventual team home run leader with 31, was the only Red not selected; the fans instead voted for Stan Musial. (Crowe would be selected to the All-Star team in 1958—the only Red so honored.) Commissioner Ford Frick removed Bell and Post from the starting lineup and replaced them with Willie Mays and Hank Aaron; Bell remained on the team as a reserve, but Post was taken off altogether. Frick also stripped the fans of the right to vote for the starters, which they’d held since 1947 and wouldn't hold again until 1970 (ironically, the Reds’ newly opened Riverfront Stadium would host the All-Star Game that year). In the third inning of that game, Hoak grounded out to shortstop Harvey Kuenn in his only plate appearance. He was subsequently replaced by Eddie Mathews.
    In 1957 Hoak improved his batting average to .293, after leading the league well into May at over .400, and set career highs in home runs (19) and RBIs (89), as well as leading the National League in doubles with 39.
    More Details Hide Details In a game against the Milwaukee Braves on April 21, Hoak was involved in a controversial play that would lead to a change in the rules. He was on second base and teammate Gus Bell was on first, when Wally Post hit a ground ball to short. Hoak broke up a potential double play by fielding the ball himself and flipping it to Milwaukee shortstop Johnny Logan. Hoak was called out for interference, but Post was given a single on the play. The day before, Johnny Temple let Bell's ground ball hit him with the same result, Temple being called out for interference and Bell being awarded a single. The two incidents prompted league presidents Warren Giles and Will Harridge to jointly announce a rule change that declared both the runner and batter out if the runner intentionally interferes with a batted ball, with no runners allowed to advance. (Without the new rule, it was sometimes advantageous for a runner to touch a batted ball, because doing so avoided a double play. In the plays already mentioned, Temple and Hoak were out according to a still-existing rule: a runner is out if a batted ball touches him in fair territory before it touches a fielder, with the batter getting a single and no runner advancing unless forced.)
  • 1956
    Age 28
    After the 1956 season the Cubs traded Hoak to the Cincinnati Redlegs in a five-player deal.
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    After the season, Hoak was traded to the Chicago Cubs. In 1956, Hoak batted .215 with 5 home runs and 37 RBIs.
    More Details Hide Details He also set a National League record by striking out six times in one game, a 17-inning marathon on May 2, won by the visiting New York Giants.
  • 1955
    Age 27
    During his two seasons with the Dodgers, Hoak shared third base duties with Jackie Robinson and Billy Cox. In 1955, the Dodgers defeated the New York Yankees in the World Series to win their only championship in Brooklyn.
    More Details Hide Details Hoak played third base in place of Robinson in the seventh and deciding game of that Series—the only World Series game Robinson did not play in during his career when his team was in the World Series.
  • 1954
    Age 26
    As a youngster Hoak was a professional boxer, but pursued a baseball career after losing seven straight knockouts. He broke into the Major Leagues in 1954 after a stint in the United States Marines, as well as having played one season in Cuba.
    More Details Hide Details Legend has it that during his one season in Cuba, Hoak actually batted against Fidel Castro, who was a law student at the time. According to The Second Fireside Book of Baseball, Castro and some friends commandeered the park where Hoak's team was playing. Castro took some warmup pitches, then turned to face Hoak and called out the Spanish equivalent of "Batter up!" and pitched. He was wild, and threw several pitches near Hoak's head. After a few "dusters", Hoak turned to the umpire and said, "Get that idiot out of the game!" The umpire obliged, and spoke to some park policemen, who marched Castro off the field.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1928
    Age 0
    Born on February 5, 1928.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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