Dorothy Kilgallen
Journalist, television personality
Dorothy Kilgallen
Dorothy Mae Kilgallen was an American journalist and television game show panelist. She started her career early as a reporter for the Hearst Corporation's New York Evening Journal after spending only two semesters at The College of New Rochelle in New Rochelle, New York. In 1936, she began her newspaper column, The Voice of Broadway, which was eventually syndicated to over 146 papers.
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Dorothy Kilgallen's personal information overview.
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'What's My Line?' When the famous were really famous - Orlando Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Panelists included New York's urbane and witty: publisher Bennett Cerf (who comes across as both arrogant and clueless), smart-funny actor Arlene Francis and prissy columnist Dorothy Kilgallen. (I remember my grandmother saying she didn't like
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Google News article
Marilyn and MJ12 - Fortean Times
Google News - over 5 years
[4] This purports to be notes made from a transcript of a phone-tap of a conversation between journalist Dorothy Kilgallen and her friend Howard Rothberg. It includes this paragraph: “Rothberg indicated in so many words, that she [Marilyn Monroe] had
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Today In Theatre History: JUNE 3 - Playbill.com
Google News - over 5 years
Today's Birthdays: George Broadhurst 1866. Maurice Evans 1901. Paulette Goddard 1911. William Douglas Home 1912. Dorothy Kilgallen 1913. Leo Gorcey 1917. Lili St. Cyr 1918. Colleen Dewhurst 1924. Barbara Walsh 1955. Jeff Blumenkrantz 1965
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How would you like to earn a degree in writing romance novels? - allvoices
Google News - over 5 years
These journalists included Shana Alexander, Vicki Baum, Erma Bombeck, Willa Cather, Carrie Chapman Catt, Dorothy Day, Dorothy Dix, Rheta Childe Dorr, Martha Gellhorn, Ann Landers, Dorothy Kilgallen, Clare Boothe Luce, Frances Marion, Agnes Meyer,
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Reconsidering “Sweet Smell of Success” - The Faster Times
Google News - almost 6 years
... as a Broadway press agent,” Lehman writes here in a piece on the origins of Sweet Smell, ”dependent on and more than a little fearful of the powerful gossip columnists of the era–Walter Winchell, Dorothy Kilgallen, Louis Sobol, Danton Walker
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ABOUT NEW YORK; From Realm Of the Stars To Half a Room
NYTimes - about 6 years
Pull back the curtain that runs down the middle of the room and look at the clutter by the window: two computer printers that double as fax machines, papers strewn on the bed. But there is also what you can't see: the occupant's memories of the night he opened a restaurant and George Harrison came in; the time Keith Richards showed up for dinner,
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ELAINE KAUFMAN, 1929-2010; A New York Fixture Who Fed And Fussed Over the Famous
NYTimes - about 6 years
Elaine Kaufman, who became something of a symbol of New York as the salty den mother of Elaine's, one of the city's best-known restaurants and a second home for almost half a century to writers, actors, athletes and other celebrities, died Friday in Manhattan. She was 81. Her death, at Lenox Hill Hospital, was caused by complications of emphysema,
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Forging On
NYTimes - over 8 years
CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME? Memoirs of a Literary Forger. By Lee Israel. 127 pp. Simon & Schuster. $19.95. In the annals of literary forgery, William Henry Ireland had Shakespeare (''Vortigern and Rowena'' -- who knew?), Thomas Chatterton the nonexistent medieval poet Rowley, and Lee Israel, well, the silent-film star Louise Brooks. Pretty far down
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Sidney Sheldon, Author of Steamy Novels, Dies at 89
NYTimes - about 10 years
Sidney Sheldon, an Oscar- and Tony-winning writer of squeaky-clean fare for stage and screen who became world famous for his later career as a writer of steamy, best-selling novels, died on Tuesday in Rancho Mirage, Calif. He was 89 and had homes in Malibu and Palm Springs, Calif. The cause was complications of pneumonia, his publicist, Warren
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Nonfiction Chronicle
NYTimes - about 11 years
THE FILM SNOB'S DICTIONARY: An Essential Lexicon of Filmological Knowledge. By David Kamp with Lawrence Levi. (Broadway, paper, $11.95.) Wire services may have trained one generation of journalists -- the foreign correspondent Ryszard Kapuscinski among them -- to write tersely. But a younger generation of journalists learned the art of brevity by
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THE NEW SEASON MUSIC; This Year, New York Is Country Country
NYTimes - over 11 years
WHEN the Grand Ole Opry first came to New York, to play two nights at Carnegie Hall in September 1947, the legendary cast -- Ernest Tubb, Minnie Pearl, Rosalie Allen -- was nervous. There had been little advertising or advance press, and the performers wondered how the big-city crowd would respond. But the first night nearly sold out, and Tubb won
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Bobby Short, Who Presided Over Sophisticated New York Night Life, Dies at 80
NYTimes - almost 12 years
Bobby Short, the cherubic singer and pianist whose high-spirited but probing renditions of popular standards evoked the glamour and sophistication of Manhattan nightlife, died yesterday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He was 80, and had homes in Manhattan and southern France. The cause was leukemia, said his press agent, Virginia Wicks. Mr.
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TELEVISION: CHANNELING; Game Show Panelists: A History
NYTimes - about 12 years
Lately, the Game Show Network, handily known as GSN, seems to be taking an unfortunate turn toward modernity. Since it was created a decade ago, the channel's major selling point has been its array of old-time game shows: guessing-game shows like ''What's My Line?'' and ''The Name's the Same'' from the 1950's, and two Ford-era favorites, the Mad
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COVER STORY; In Search Of Youth: Game Show Makeovers
NYTimes - over 12 years
ASKED which of four American artists painted ''Nighthawks,'' an ''ode to big-city loneliness,'' a contestant on ''Russian Roulette'' guesses Andrew Wyeth. (As anybody who has ever walked through the front door of the Whitney knows, it was Edward Hopper.) On ''Dog Eat Dog,'' a man asked to name the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea answers,
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Charlie McCarthy Hearings
NYTimes - almost 13 years
Following is the text of a letter sent yesterday to Thomas H. Kean and Lee H. Hamilton of the Sept. 11 commission from Alberto R. Gonzales, counsel to President Bush. While we continue to hold to the principles underlying the Constitutional separation of powers, that the appropriate and patriotic action for the Commission is to shut down and stop
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No Joke! 37 Years After Death Lenny Bruce Receives Pardon
NYTimes - about 13 years
Lenny Bruce, the potty-mouthed wit who turned stand-up comedy into social commentary, was posthumously pardoned yesterday by Gov. George E. Pataki, 39 years after being convicted of obscenity for using bad words in a Greenwich Village nightclub act. The governor said the posthumous pardon -- the first in the state's history -- was ''a declaration
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PUBLIC LIVES; That Winchell-Era Publicist? Still in the Game, Baby
NYTimes - almost 15 years
SY PRESTEN'S hands are shaking, but here's how good he is: You ask him about it, he'll tell you they are not. It's kind of like a country music song, though with Mr. Presten being a New York press agent of such an extended run that he used to pitch Walter Winchell, think of it as a country music song out of Gotham, sung by Sammy Davis Jr., circa
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Only Gossip
NYTimes - almost 15 years
I remember the first time I saw Burt Lancaster, as the gossip columnist J.J. Hunsecker, watch a drunk get tossed out of a strip club and say, with satanic gusto, ''I love this dirty town.'' It was funny and horrible, riveting. For certain people, the 1957 movie ''Sweet Smell of Success'' has an almost ''Rocky Horror Picture Show'' cult appeal: we
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dorothy Kilgallen
    FIFTIES
  • 1965
    Age 51
    On November 8, 1965, Kilgallen was found dead on the third floor of her five-story townhouse.
    More Details Hide Details She had succumbed to a fatal combination of alcohol and barbiturates, possibly concurrent with a heart attack, according to medical examiner James Luke. At the time of her death, Kilgallen and Richard Kollmar had been married for 25 years, and she left behind three children. On November 11, Dorothy Kilgallen's funeral mass was held at her parish church, St. Vincent Ferrer on Lexington Avenue. Approximately 2,000 people attended it. She was interred in a modest grave at Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Hawthorne, New York. On the following Sunday night's What's My Line?, telecast live on November 14, To Tell the Truth regular panelist Kitty Carlisle, who had been a guest panelist on three previous episodes of What's My Line?, filled in for Kilgallen temporarily. She said on camera that although she was occupying Kilgallen's seat, she could never take her place.
  • 1964
    Age 50
    Kilgallen was publicly skeptical of the conclusions of the Warren Commission's report into the assassination of President Kennedy and wrote a number of articles on the subject. She obtained a copy of Jack Ruby's testimony to the Warren Commission, which she published in August 1964 on the front pages of the Journal American, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Seattle Post Intelligencer, and other newspapers.
    More Details Hide Details Most of that testimony did not become officially available to the public until the commission released its 26 volumes of hearings and exhibits in November 1964, around the time of the first anniversary of the assassination.
    In July 1964, four months after the Overseas Press Club event where Kilgallen broke her silence about the deceased Judge Blythin, Judge Weinman of the federal court granted Bailey's habeas corpus petition, Dr. Sam Sheppard was released from prison amid much newspaper publicity, and Dr. Sheppard met Kilgallen at a "late-night champagne party" (as described by Bailey in The Defense Never Rests) in Cleveland.
    More Details Hide Details After Kilgallen's death, Dr. Sheppard was retried and acquitted.
  • FORTIES
  • 1954
    Age 40
    Similar to Kilgallen's statement, Murray's statement indicated that the original Sheppard judge, Edward J. Blythin, had declared Dr. Sheppard guilty even before the grand jury's August 17, 1954 indictment of Dr. Sheppard.
    More Details Hide Details
    Her articles and columns in 1954 did not reveal all she had witnessed in the Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas.
    More Details Hide Details Nine years and some months after the verdict and the judge's immediate pronouncement of the life sentence, she revealed publicly, at an event that was held at the Overseas Press Club in New York, that the judge had told her before the start of jury selection that Dr. Sheppard was "guilty as hell." Attorney F. Lee Bailey, who was working on a habeas corpus petition for his client Dr. Sheppard, attended the Overseas Press Club event, heard what Kilgallen told the crowd and then asked her privately if she would help him. "Some days later," as Bailey wrote in his memoir The Defense Never Rests, "we obtained a deposition from Dorothy that was inserted into the petition submitted to" Carl Andrew Weinman, judge for the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. Bailey also included in the habeas corpus petition a statement from Edward Murray, who had worked in 1954 as a court clerk at the Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas.
    At the time of the Cleveland jury's guilty verdict in December 1954, Kilgallen's sharp criticism of it was controversial and a Cleveland newspaper dropped her column in response.
    More Details Hide Details
    Kilgallen covered the 1954 murder trial of Dr. Sam Sheppard.
    More Details Hide Details The New York Journal American carried the banner front-page headline that she was "astounded" by the guilty verdict because of what she argued were serious flaws in the prosecution's case. The doctor, whose specialty was osteopathic neurosurgery, was convicted of bludgeoning his wife to death at their home in the Cleveland suburb of Bay Village.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1948
    Age 34
    Though Kilgallen and Frank Sinatra were fairly good friends for several years and were photographed rehearsing in a radio studio for a 1948 broadcast, they had a falling out after she wrote a multi-part 1956 front-page feature story titled "The Frank Sinatra Story".
    More Details Hide Details In addition to the New York Journal-American, Hearst-owned newspapers across the United States ran the story. Thereafter Sinatra made derogatory comments about Kilgallen's physical appearance to his audiences at nightclubs in New York and Las Vegas, though he stopped short of mentioning her name on television or during interviews for magazines and newspapers.
  • 1945
    Age 31
    Beginning in April 1945, Kilgallen and Kollmar co-hosted a WOR-AM radio talk show, Breakfast With Dorothy and Dick, from their 16-room apartment at 640 Park Avenue.
    More Details Hide Details The show followed them when they bought a Neo-Georgian townhouse at 45 East 68th Street in 1952. The radio program, like Kilgallen's newspaper column, mixed entertainment with serious issues. Kilgallen and Kollmar continued doing the show from their home until 1963, long after the terminations of other radio shows on which each had worked without the other. Kilgallen was among the notables on the guest list of those who attended the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953. Kilgallen's articles about the coronation won her a Pulitzer Prize nomination. In 1950, Kilgallen became a panelist on the American television game show What's My Line?, which was telecast from New York City on the CBS television network from 1950 to 1967. She remained on the show for 15 years, until her death. Fellow panelist Bennett Cerf claimed that, unlike the rest of the panel members, whose priority was getting a laugh and entertaining the audience, Kilgallen was interested mainly in guessing the correct answers. Cerf claimed she would extend her time on camera by asking more questions than necessary, the answers to which she knew would be affirmative.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1940
    Age 26
    On April 6, 1940, Kilgallen married Richard Kollmar, a musical comedy actor and singer who had starred in the Broadway show Knickerbocker Holiday and was performing, at the time of their wedding, in the Broadway cast of Too Many Girls.
    More Details Hide Details Early in their marriage, both Kilgallen and Kollmar launched careers in network radio, Kilgallen with her radio program Voice of Broadway, which was broadcast on CBS during World War II, and Kollmar with a long stint in the nationally syndicated crime drama in which he played Boston Blackie.
  • 1938
    Age 24
    Back in New York in 1938, Kilgallen began writing a daily column, the Voice of Broadway, for Hearst's New York Journal American, which the corporation created by merging the Evening Journal with the American.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1936
    Age 22
    During a stint living in Hollywood in 1936 and 1937, Kilgallen wrote a daily column primarily read in New York, which provoked a libel suit from Constance Bennett, "who in the early thirties had been the highest paid performer in motion pictures", according to a Kilgallen biography, "but who was 1937 experiencing a temporary decline in popular appeal."
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1936, Kilgallen competed with two other New York newspaper reporters in a race around the world using only means of transportation available to the general public.
    More Details Hide Details She was the only woman to compete in the contest and she came in second. She described the event in her book Girl Around The World, which is credited as the story idea for the 1937 movie Fly-Away Baby starring Glenda Farrell as a character partly inspired by Kilgallen.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1920
    Age 6
    The family moved to various regions of the United States until 1920, when the International News Service hired James Kilgallen as a roving correspondent based in New York City.
    More Details Hide Details The family settled in Brooklyn, New York. After completing two semesters at The College of New Rochelle, Dorothy Kilgallen dropped out to take a job as a reporter for the New York Evening Journal. This newspaper was owned and operated by the Hearst Corporation, which also owned International News Service, her father's employer.
  • 1913
    Born
    Born on July 3, 1913.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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