Dorothy Lamour
Actress, singer
Dorothy Lamour
Dorothy Lamour was an American film actress. She is best remembered for appearing in the Road to... movies, a series of successful comedies starring Bing Crosby and Bob Hope.
Biography
Dorothy Lamour's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of Dorothy Lamour
News
News abour Dorothy Lamour from around the web
Hurricane movies to watch this weekend - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
Directed by John Ford and produced by Samuel Goldwyn, the film is set in the South Seas and centers on an American woman (Dorothy Lamour) who falls in love with a native on US-occupied territory (Jon Hall). He is unjustly imprisoned after a saloon
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Virgil Stanfield: Theaters had grace, style in the old days - Mansfield News Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Joan Bennett, Donald Cook, John Raitt, Tom Ewell, Hans Conreid, Dorothy Lamour and Tandy Cronyn were among the stars who came here in Broadway productions. James D. Merrill, who retired last week after being affiliated with the Ohio for more than 20
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Imeldific at 82 - Inquirer.net
Google News - over 5 years
[My hair is] still long because my papa, I don't why, wanted me to look like Dorothy Lamour or Lady Godiva. President Marcos also liked my hair long. How long does it take you to fix it? Now it takes faster, maybe 20 minutes
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Nuneaton couple brought together by Coventry Blitz celebrate diamond wedding - Coventry Telegraph
Google News - over 5 years
“I was 14 and we did not go on our first proper date until about a year later, when we went to the pictures one afternoon to see Dorothy Lamour in Beyond the Blue Horizon and sat on the front row.” On the night of the Coventry Blitz, Edith's mother was
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Pareo vs kaftano - Vogue.it
Google News - over 5 years
Cominciò a divenir noto al grande pubblico grazie al film Uragano di John Ford (1937) con la bella Dorothy Lamour nei panni di un'indigena. Ma il grande successo arrivò negli anni Cinquanta con le pellicole di Esther Williams ed Elvis Presley,
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Little Old Woman: Ah-ha! Moments and Chicken Little - Morning Star
Google News - over 5 years
I was wearing my new two-piece Dorothy LaMour bathing suit, and when I came up the top piece remained on the bottom of the gravel pit! So much for adventure. Caution was my middle name until I married Al at age 60. We would happily climb aboard a
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The World's A Stage And Tourists Are The Players - PsychCentral.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Dorothy Lamour on a Mexican beach? I don't want to be conspicuously miscast for my role, or to feel like I'm wearing a costume. As well as considering the climate and activities (which might require props, such as hiking boots for the mountains or a
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What's on Today
NYTimes - over 5 years
9 P.M. (CMT) SWEET HOME ALABAMA In a country spin on ''The Bachelorette,'' 20 men from across the nation converge on Fairhope, Ala., with one goal: to woo Devin Grissom (above, with her suitors), a student at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa who hopes to pursue a career in public relations for a professional sports team and find a true love
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Ask the Incredible Inman | Flick was 'The Greatest' - Louisville Courier-Journal
Google News - over 5 years
It was directed by Cecil B. DeMille, and the all-star cast included Charlton Heston, Betty Hutton, Dorothy Lamour, James Stewart and Cornel Wilde. It's on DVD, if you'd like to see it again. Freelance writer David Inman's column appears daily
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TV Q&A with David Inman - Boston Herald
Google News - over 5 years
A. That's “The Greatest Show on Earth,” which won Oscars for Best Picture and Best Screenplay in 1952. It was directed by Cecil B. DeMille and the all-star cast included Charlton Heston, Betty Hutton, Dorothy Lamour, James Stewart and Cornel Wilde
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'Movies by Moonlight' series travels back in time - Corvallis Gazette Times
Google News - over 5 years
Starring Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour. Directed by Hal Walker. Ol' Ski Nose and the Groaner are back, this time as vaudeville performers doubling as pearl divers in Australia. Of course, that's no place for men of their caliber (plus,
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David Bedella & Michael Jibson in Road Show - WhatsOnStage.com
Google News - over 5 years
So long, in fact, it bears no relation at all to his original idea, which was for a sort of “Road” movie of the Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour variety. John Doyle's busy but curiously soulless production – performed in a traverse arrangement
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July: Turner Classic Movies looks at Arabs in film - Arizona Republic
Google News - over 5 years
In July, it also is presenting the late films of Clark Gable, the cinematography of Russell Harlan and six thrillers about nuclear disaster - to say nothing of mini retrospectives of the films of Shirley Jones, Tab Hunter, Dorothy Lamour, Lew Ayres and
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It was bound to happen, but it still stings a little - The Desert Sun
Google News - over 5 years
I made a reference the other day to the Road pictures, and the guy sitting next to me had no idea I was talking about a famous series of movies Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour made mostly in the 1940s. But the first Road picture,
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TV film fare - week of July 10 - Catholic Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Wacky comic romp in which castaways Bing Crosby and Bob Hope land in a desert kingdom, vie to wed its princess (Dorothy Lamour) and wind up captives of a rebel Arab chieftain (Anthony Quinn). Directed by David Butler, the third Road comedy continues
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Sanders: Bad movies produced good songs - Opelika Auburn News
Google News - over 5 years
A similar case is "The Fleet's In," starring William Holden and Dorothy Lamour. His fellow sailors bet Holden he can't get a date with the icy Lamour. He does and they fall in love. But then she hears about the bet and ends the affair, at least for a
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dorothy Lamour
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1996
    Age 81
    Lamour died at her home in North Hollywood on September 22, 1996, at the age of 81.
    More Details Hide Details She was interred in the Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills Cemetery in Los Angeles. For her contribution to the radio and motion picture industry, Lamour has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Her star for her radio contributions is located at 6240 Hollywood Boulevard and her star for her motion picture contributions is located at 6332 Hollywood Boulevard. Lamour's autobiography, My Side of the Road (1980), was published by Prentice-Hall. Lamour is the heroine of Matilda Bailey's young adult novel, Dorothy Lamour and the Haunted Lighthouse (1947), whose "heroine has the same name and appearance as the famous actress but has no connection... it is as though the famous actress has stepped into an alternate reality in which she is an ordinary person." The story was written for a young teenage audience and is reminiscent of the adventures of Nancy Drew. It is part of a series known as "Whitman Authorized Editions", 16 books published between 1941-1947 that each featured a film actress as heroine.
  • 1987
    Age 72
    In 1987, she made one last big-screen appearance in the movie Creepshow 2, appearing with George Kennedy as an aging couple who are killed during a robbery.
    More Details Hide Details The wooden, Native American statue in front of their general store comes to life to avenge their death. The 72-year-old Lamour quipped: "Well, at my age you can't lean against a palm tree and sing 'Moon of Manakoora'," she said. "People would look at that and say, 'What is she trying to do? During the 1990s, she made only a handful of professional appearances but remained a popular interview subject for publications and TV talk and news programs. In 1995, the musical Swinging on a Star, a revue of songs written by Johnny Burke (who wrote many of the most famous Road to movie songs as well as the score to Lamour's film And the Angels Sing (1944)) opened on Broadway and ran for three months; Lamour was credited as a "special advisor". It was nominated for the Best Musical Tony Award; the actress playing her in the road movie segment, Kathy Fitzgerald, was also nominated.
  • 1980
    Age 65
    In 1980, Lamour published her autobiography, My Side of the Road, and revived her nightclub act.
    More Details Hide Details During the remainder of the decade, she performed in plays and television shows such as Hart to Hart, Crazy Like a Fox, Remington Steele, and Murder, She Wrote.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1965
    Age 50
    In 1965, Lamour was awarded a belated citation from the United States Department of the Treasury for her war bond sales.
    More Details Hide Details Some of Lamour's other notable films include Johnny Apollo (1940; with Tyrone Power), Aloma of the South Seas (1941), Beyond the Blue Horizon (1942), Dixie (1943; with Bing Crosby), A Medal for Benny (1945), My Favorite Brunette (1947; with Bob Hope), On Our Merry Way (1948), Slightly French (1949) and a supporting role in the best picture Oscar-winner The Greatest Show on Earth (1952; with Charlton Heston). Her other leading men included William Holden, Ray Milland, James Stewart, Jack Benny, and Fred MacMurray. Lamour emceed Front and Center, a 1947 variety comedy show, as a summer replacement for The Fred Allen Show, with the Army Air Force recruiting as sponsors. The show changed to The Sealtest Variety Theater in September 1948. Lamour starred in a number of movie musicals and sang in many of her comedies and dramatic films as well. She introduced a number of standards, including "The Moon of Manakoora", "I Remember You", "It Could Happen to You", "Personality", and "But Beautiful".
  • FORTIES
  • 1962
    Age 47
    The series essentially ended with the release of Road to Hong Kong, in 1962, in which Lamour only made a cameo appearance.
    More Details Hide Details Actress Joan Collins was the female lead in that picture. During World War II, Lamour was among the most popular pinup girls among American servicemen, along with Betty Grable, Rita Hayworth, Lana Turner, and Veronica Lake. Lamour was also known for her volunteer working selling war bonds during tours in which movie stars would travel the country selling U.S. government bonds to the public. Lamour reportedly sold $300 million worth of bonds earning her the nickname "The Bombshell of Bombs". She also volunteered at the Hollywood Canteen where she would dance and talk to soldiers.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1943
    Age 28
    On April 7, 1943, Lamour married former Air Force Captain and advertising executive William Ross Howard III in Beverly Hills.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had two sons: John Ridgely (born January 1946) and Richard Thomson Howard (born October 1949). In the 1960s and 1970s, Lamour and Howard lived in the Baltimore suburb of Sudbrook Park. She also owned a home in Palm Springs, California. Howard died in 1978.
    Lamour married her second husband, William Ross Howard III, in 1943. They had two sons and remained married until Howard's death in 1978.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1940
    Age 25
    In 1940, Lamour co-starred in the first of several Road to films with Bing Crosby and Bob Hope.
    More Details Hide Details The movies were enormously popular during the 1940s, and they regularly placed among the top moneymaking films each year. While the films centered more on Hope and Crosby, Lamour held her own as their "straight man", and sang some of her most popular songs.
  • 1937
    Age 22
    From 1937 to 1939, Lamour appeared in John Ford's The Hurricane (1937), Spawn of the North (1938; with George Raft, Henry Fonda, and John Barrymore), and Disputed Passage (1939).
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1936
    Age 21
    In 1936, Lamour moved to Hollywood.
    More Details Hide Details That same year, she did a screen test for Paramount Pictures and signed a contract with them. Lamour began appearing regularly in films for Paramount Pictures. She made her first film for Paramount, College Holiday, in which she has a bit part as an uncredited dancer. Her second film for Paramount, The Jungle Princess (1936), solidified her fame. In the film, Lamour plays the role of "Ulah", a jungle native who wore an Edith Head-designed sarong throughout the film. The Jungle Princess was a big hit for the studio and Lamour would be associated with sarongs for the rest of her career.
  • 1935
    Age 20
    Lamour's first marriage was to orchestra leader Herbie Kay, whose orchestra Lamour sang with. The two married in 1935 and divorced in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details Early in her career, Lamour met J. Edgar Hoover, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. According to Hoover's biographer Richard Hack, Hoover pursued a romantic relationship with Lamour, and the two spent a night together at a Washington, D.C. hotel. When Lamour was later asked if she and Hoover had a sexual relationship, she replied: "I cannot deny it." In her autobiography, My Side of the Road (1980), Lamour does not discuss Hoover in detail; she only refers to him as "a lifelong friend".
    In 1935, she had her own fifteen-minute weekly musical program on NBC Radio.
    More Details Hide Details Lamour also sang on the popular Rudy Vallee radio show and The Chase and Sanborn Hour. On January 30, 1944, Lamour starred in "For This We Live," an episode of Silver Theater on CBS radio.
    Kay hired her as a singer for his orchestra and, in 1935, Lamour went on tour with Kay.
    More Details Hide Details Her work with Kay eventually led Lamour to vaudeville and work in radio.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1931
    Age 16
    She began entering beauty pageants and was crowned "Miss New Orleans" in 1931.
    More Details Hide Details Lamour used the prize money to support herself while she worked in a stock theatre company. She and her mother later moved to Chicago where Lamour found a job working at Marshall Field's department store. She was discovered by orchestra leader Herbie Kay when he spotted her in performance at a Chicago talent show held at the Hotel Morrison.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1914
    Born
    Born on December 10, 1914.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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