Dorothy Tutin
British actor
Dorothy Tutin
Dame Dorothy Tutin DBE was an English actress of stage, film and television. An obituary in the Daily Telegraph described her as "one of the most enchanting, accomplished and intelligent leading ladies on the post-war British stage.
Biography
Dorothy Tutin's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Dorothy Tutin from around the web
Cyril Ornadel - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
In 1963 the two men worked with Croft on a musical adaptation of HG Wells's novel Ann Veronica, at the Cambridge Theatre, with Dorothy Tutin; but the reviewers found it insipid and flabby, and the production had only a short run. Then came Pickwick
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Google News article
John Wood: an actor who made us see things anew - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Something clearly had happened and Dorothy Tutin sat fearfully waiting for him to speak. Pausing only to pour a much needed drink he announced finally and quietly 'I've killed him'. He has just returned from a duel and yet the restrained panic in his
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Google News article
Theatre Broadcast Review: The Importance of Being Earnest in HD by Oscar Wilde - Blogcritics.org (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The watermark for any production is the great classic movie of the play with Edith Evans, Michael Redgrave, Joan Greenwood, Dorothy Tutin, and Margaret Rutherford. This remains one of my favorite movies of all time. It is an exquisite gem
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Google News article
Sean Connery, The First Actor Ever To Kiss A Male Co-Star On TV - allvoices
Google News - over 5 years
The story behind the kissing scene was that Sean finds out about the fact that his brother is secretly sleeping with his wife, played by Dorothy Tutin, another very fine actress. In an attempt to explain it to his brother that he is not doing right by
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Google News article
BFI has footage of first male-to-male television kiss - featuring Sean Connery - PinkNews.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Connery's character suspects his brother is sleeping with his wife, played by Dorothy Tutin. In an attempt to understand what his brother has that he lacks, he kisses him. The footage, which was found at the US Library of Congress and given to the BFI,
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Google News article
Life of inspirational Anne Lewis-Smith remembered - Western Telegraph
Google News - almost 6 years
Her work was held in high regard and was recognised when by the Dorothy Tutin Award in 1975. She was editor to six different publications, publisher of Envoi Poets Publications, which included poets from all over the world, and had also worked as a
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Google News article
Hurting the one you love - Denton Record Chronicle
Google News - almost 6 years
The student is Henri Gaudier (Scott Antony, going full speed), later to add Brzeska to his last name when he meets the much older Sophie Brzeska (Dorothy Tutin). The two live together and share an unconsummated romance. But they also live a full,
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Google News article
Cinema royalty: King George VI, Tracy & Hepburn - knox.VillageSoup.com (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
They are Annette Crosbie as Catherine of Aragon, Dorothy Tutin as Anne Boleyn, Anne Stallybrass as Jane Seymour, Elvi Hale as Anne of Cleves, Angela Pleasence as Catherine Howard and Rosalie Crutchley as Catherine Parr. Equal time is spent on Henry's
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Google News article
SUMMER MOVIES; The Importance of Being Wildean but Also Cinematic
NYTimes - almost 15 years
THE play is utterly familiar, a perfect marriage of form and content, with some of the most famous lines in English comedy. (''To lose one parent, Mr. Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.'') The question in adapting Oscar Wilde's ''Importance of Being Earnest'' for the screen, then, is how to turn this
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NYTimes article
The Master's Voice
NYTimes - over 15 years
GIELGUD A Theatrical Life. By Jonathan Croall. Illustrated. 580 pp. New York: Continuum. $35. THE work of a stage actor, however great, is writ on water. Not all stars of the theater are available on film, and those that are lose something when not seen in the flesh. John Gielgud came to excel in both media, but still, it was for his theatrical
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NYTimes article
Dame Dorothy Tutin, 71, Acclaimed British Actress
NYTimes - over 15 years
Dame Dorothy Tutin, one of the most versatile and admired of British actresses, died on Monday in London, where she lived. She was 71. She had been suffering from leukemia, said her agent, Michael Whitehall. During her long and rich career, Ms. Tutin played almost all of Shakespeare's leading female roles, from Ophelia and Juliet to Portia and Lady
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NYTimes article
FESTIVAL REVIEW; Pinter the Actor Meets Pinter the Writer
NYTimes - over 15 years
The alarm sirens should be screaming at Lincoln Center. Evil has arrived there in a sleek, fleshy package with a baritone purr. That famous ambiguous sense of menace that has always haunted Harold Pinter's plays has at last been given a human face, and its name is -- take a breath -- Harold Pinter. So it would seem from Mr. Pinter's performance in
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NYTimes article
Michael Denison, Actor of Stage and Screen, Dies at 82
NYTimes - over 18 years
Michael Denison, who epitomized the English gentleman in scores of roles on stage, screen, television and radio and who, with Dulcie Gray, formed one of acting's most durable husband-and-wife teams, died on Wednesday at his home in Amersham, a Buckinghamshire town about 30 miles southwest of London. Mr. Denison was 82. The cause was cancer, said
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NYTimes article
Full of Life And Love As Time Runs Out
NYTimes - over 19 years
Screen acting that transports you into the skin of a character is so unusual that when encountered, it can actually be unsettling. And in ''Alive and Kicking,'' a British drama set in a dance world decimated by AIDS, Jason Flemyng gives a performance of such fiery visceral intensity that there are moments when you feel you are inhabiting his
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NYTimes article
THEATER;This Pair Shares A Fine Romance, Onstage and Off
NYTimes - over 20 years
AFTER 57 YEARS OF MARRIAGE and 28 plays together, the actors Dulcie Gray and Michael Denison don't just share a dressing room; they like to make it as homey as possible. They have done that again for their dual Broadway debut in Oscar Wilde's "Ideal Husband" at the Ethel Barrymore Theater. All that's missing is the kind of sketches and caricatures
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NYTimes article
Always Busy, Seemingly by Accident
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Onstage, Brian Murray communicates a certain verity and an authenticity, whether he is playing Falstaff or a shady character in a Joe Orton black comedy. This is, of course, both a key to his virtuosity and also a reason he is not more celebrated. It is not easy to define a Brian Murray role, which is why he can seem so infinite. In less than one
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Harry C. Blaney, 86, A Theater Producer
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: Harry Clay Blaney, a theater producer who was active in New York for more than three decades, died on Wednesday at St. Vincent's Hospital. He was 86 years old and lived in Manhattan. He died of leukemia, said his son, Harry Clay Blaney 3d. Mr. Blaney, who came from a theatrical family that dated to the 1880's, ended his career as a Broadway
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NYTimes article
2,000 Attend a Westminster Memorial for Olivier
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: Friends and fellow actors gathered at Westminster Abbey today to celebrate the life and achievements of Laurence Olivier. Friends and fellow actors gathered at Westminster Abbey today to celebrate the life and achievements of Laurence Olivier. At a memorial service full of pageantry and attended by 2,000 celebrities, politicians and members
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NYTimes article
Education; From Shakespeare to Hansberry to Cafeteria Post
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: The waxed floor of Room 108L glistens from the morning light. Vacant student desks are marshaled like a platoon set for a parade. Chris Ask is already at his desk going through trial runs with the tape recorder and phonograph that will be vital to the day's lessons. The waxed floor of Room 108L glistens from the morning light. Vacant student
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NYTimes article
HOME VIDEO/NEW RELEASES
NYTimes - about 29 years
LEAD: The Big Easy Starring Dennis Quaid, Ellen Barkin, Ned Beatty, Ebbe Roe Smith, Marc Lawrence, John Goodman, Lisa Jane Persky, Charles Ludlam. Directed by Jim McBride. 1987. HBO Video. 100 minutes. $89.95. Rated R. The Big Easy Starring Dennis Quaid, Ellen Barkin, Ned Beatty, Ebbe Roe Smith, Marc Lawrence, John Goodman, Lisa Jane Persky,
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Dorothy Tutin
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2001
    Age 70
    She married the actor Derek Waring, and they had two children, Nicholas and Amanda, both of whom also became actors. Dorothy Tutin and Derek Waring remained married until her death in 2001 at the age of 71 from leukaemia.
    More Details Hide Details Waring died in 2007. Tutin was created a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1967, and raised to Dame Commander (DBE) in 2000.
  • FORTIES
  • 1972
    Age 41
    She also played Margot Asquith, the wife of Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, in the dramatic series Number 10. (The Asquiths' son Anthony directed Dorothy Tutin in her film debut.) She appeared in the Ken Russell film Savage Messiah in 1972.
    More Details Hide Details She also performed as the teacher Sarah Burton in the TV series South Riding (1974), based on the novel South Riding by Winifred Holtby. She starred as Mrs. Alving in Yorkshire Television production of Ibsen's Ghosts (1977) with Richard Pasco, Ronald Fraser, Brian Deacon, and Julia Foster. In the early 1980s Tutin also appeared in the made-for-television film Murder with Mirrors (based on an Agatha Christie novel) along with Helen Hayes and Bette Davis. Another of her notable roles was as Goneril in an Emmy-winning television production of Shakespeare's King Lear, opposite Laurence Olivier as King Lear and Robert Lang as the Duke of Albany. She guest starred in an episode of the 1980s TV-series Robin of Sherwood, as Lady Margaret of Gisbourne.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1969
    Age 38
    She continued to divide her appearances between stage, TV and film, appearing in the title role of a television production of Jean Anouilh's Antigone in 1969 and in the 1970 film Cromwell as Queen Henrietta Maria, before playing another Queen in 1970 – Anne Boleyn in the BBC's series The Six Wives of Henry VIII, which starred Keith Michell in the title role.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1963
    Age 32
    Having made her Broadway debut in the 1963 production of The Hollow Crown, she received a Tony Award nomination for her role in the 1968 original Broadway production of Portrait of a Queen.
    More Details Hide Details In the 1970s, she won a second Best Actress Evening Standard Award and twice won the Olivier Award (then the Society of London awards) for Best Actress in a Revival, for A Month in the Country and The Double Dealer. Her films included The Importance of Being Earnest (1952), The Beggar's Opera (1953), A Tale of Two Cities (1958), Savage Messiah (1972) and The Shooting Party (1985). An obituary in The Daily Telegraph described her as "one of the most enchanting, accomplished and intelligent leading ladies on the post-war British stage. With her husky voice, deep brown eyes, wistful smile and sense of humour, she brought an enduring charm to all kinds of stage drama, ancient and modern, as well as to films and television plays in a career that spanned more than 40 years".
  • TWENTIES
  • 1958
    Age 27
    Her next major film role was as Lucie in the 1958 film A Tale of Two Cities, opposite Dirk Bogarde.
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  • 1952
    Age 21
    Dorothy Tutin's unusual looks, as well as her acting ability, led to early success. She won the role of Cecily in Anthony Asquith's 1952 film version of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (BAFTA nomination for Most Promising Newcomer).
    More Details Hide Details In the same year she played Polly Peachum to Laurence Olivier's Macheath in Peter Brook's film version of The Beggar's Opera (1953).
  • 1951
    Age 20
    At the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith in September 1951 she played Martina in Christopher Fry's Thor With Angels, followed in January 1952 by Hero in John Gielgud's triumphant production of Much Ado About Nothing at the Phoenix Theatre.
    More Details Hide Details Subsequent roles included: Work with the RSC Tutin first joined the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre Company for the 1960 season in Stratford-upon-Avon, appearing as Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, Viola in Twelfth Night and Cressida in Troilus and Cressida. Then with the same company (but renamed the Royal Shakespeare Company from January 1961) she appeared as: Other work included:
  • TEENAGE
  • 1950
    Age 19
    She joined the Old Vic company in London for the 1950–51 season, playing among other parts, Win-the-Fight Littlewit in Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Fair, Ann Page in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Princess Katharine in Henry V.
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    She joined the Bristol Old Vic Company in January 1950, appearing as Phebe in As You Like It, Anni in Denis Cannan's Captain Carvallo and Belinda in John Vanbrugh's The Provok'd Wife.
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  • 1949
    Age 18
    Dorothy Tutin made her first stage appearance at the Boltons on 6 September 1949, playing Princess Margaret of England in William Douglas-Home's play The Thistle and the Rose.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1931
    Age 0
    Her year of birth was sometimes given as 1931, said to disguise the circumstances of her birth, but certainly not by herself.
    More Details Hide Details She was educated at St Catherine's School, Bramley, Surrey and studied for the stage at PARADA and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Tutin was also a talented pianist, but chose acting rather than music as her vocation.
  • 1930
    Born
    Dorothy Tutin was born in London on 8 April 1930, the daughter of John Tutin and his wife Adie Evelyn (Fryers), a couple who married the following year.
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